Electric Cars

Prepper & Survivalism Forum

Help Support Doomsday Prepper Forums:

randolphrowzee

Member
Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2021
Messages
38
Reaction score
98
Location
dallas
If gasoline gets scarce, won't the same thing will happen to diesel? Aren't both products produced in the same refineries? The last power source to be shut down will be electricity because so many power plants are coal fired, and the coal is mined right here in the US. Also, since the power plants usually aren't very close to each other geographically, they don't present much of a target, since if you shut one down, a different one picks up the load, which isn't the case with gas and diesel as was demonstrated when some Russians shut down the pipeline that supplies most of the east coast. Power suppliers utilize monopolies and economies of scale, which is why electricity is so cheap in most of the country. Of course, I'm not referring to Texas, where if it snows a foot the power goes off and you get a power bill for five grand.
Makes sense to prep using gas, diesel, and electric. I've got gas trucks, diesel trucks, and I've been looking for a used electric car for several years but the dealers say that the trade ins are sold as soon as they hit the lots. One that I looked at had the battery compartment under the passenger area, so their was a trunk in the front and the rest was a hatchback, so there was a surprising amount of room. .
 

Brent S

Top Poster
Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2013
Messages
14,636
Reaction score
32,365
Location
South East US
If gasoline gets scarce, won't the same thing will happen to diesel? Aren't both products produced in the same refineries? The last power source to be shut down will be electricity because so many power plants are coal fired, and the coal is mined right here in the US. Also, since the power plants usually aren't very close to each other geographically, they don't present much of a target, since if you shut one down, a different one picks up the load, which isn't the case with gas and diesel as was demonstrated when some Russians shut down the pipeline that supplies most of the east coast. Power suppliers utilize monopolies and economies of scale, which is why electricity is so cheap in most of the country. Of course, I'm not referring to Texas, where if it snows a foot the power goes off and you get a power bill for five grand.
Makes sense to prep using gas, diesel, and electric. I've got gas trucks, diesel trucks, and I've been looking for a used electric car for several years but the dealers say that the trade ins are sold as soon as they hit the lots. One that I looked at had the battery compartment under the passenger area, so their was a trunk in the front and the rest was a hatchback, so there was a surprising amount of room. .
I’ve considered getting an antique car and retrofitting it to electric. The 30’s Ford pickups are pretty cool looking and have a bed you could line with the batteries then cover it with a new bed. But by the time you do all that you will have as much invested as a new Tesla which has the latest technologies and comforts. Something to think about anyways. As far as prepping goes for electric cars having a solar panel bank to recharge it at home is the smartest option. Prepping is all about being as self reliant as possible.
 

Mountain Dragon

God Like
Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2020
Messages
381
Reaction score
1,541
Location
Switzerland
I’ve considered getting an antique car and retrofitting it to electric. The 30’s Ford pickups are pretty cool looking and have a bed you could line with the batteries then cover it with a new bed. But by the time you do all that you will have as much invested as a new Tesla which has the latest technologies and comforts. Something to think about anyways. As far as prepping goes for electric cars having a solar panel bank to recharge it at home is the smartest option. Prepping is all about being as self reliant as possible.
You really want to destroy historical cultural assets? Sounds like you have no respect for the engineering art of our fathers and forefathers.
 

Brent S

Top Poster
Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2013
Messages
14,636
Reaction score
32,365
Location
South East US
You really want to destroy historical cultural assets? Sounds like you have no respect for the engineering art of our fathers and forefathers.
I’ve had an original antique car before. Yes I love the style and design, but it was noisy, uncomfortable and needed work all the time. I have no problem with keeping the original style but gutting it and bringing it into the 21st century. It’s the best if both worlds. Now, if you’re getting it as a museum piece its great to keep it original. But if you want a daily driver then improvements are nice. I really like air conditioning, power steering, brakes with dual master cylinders for safety, seat belts, entertainment system, smooth rides etc.
 

Arcticdude

A True Doomsday Prepper
Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2013
Messages
8,516
Reaction score
28,189
Location
Undisclosed Northwest location
I dont have a problem with electric cars. I think that whoever wants one should get one. A couple things that I've never heard talked about is, how long do they take to charge? How long does a charge last when its cold and the heater/defroster is on? How about 4 wheel drive? Not everyone lives in urban areas where they're only a few miles from shopping, work etc. Or on flat ground. How about those of us that need a real truck, that live in mountainous areas, cold winters, and everything is a long distance away. I guess we should all move to town?
I just dont see the sense in trying to force something on people when there's already a good product on the market, and there's an abundant amount of fuel available.
 

DrHenley

Top Poster
Global Moderator
Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2013
Messages
12,554
Reaction score
39,892
Location
Columbus, GA USA
I am interested in having an electric off road vehicle and here is why: If you have independent electric motors for each wheel (some do, most don't) then drive trains and differentials become obsolete. And you always have full power to every wheel.

As far as how much "pulling power" you could have, modern locomotives use electric motors. The electricity is generated on board by diesel engines.
 

Arcticdude

A True Doomsday Prepper
Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2013
Messages
8,516
Reaction score
28,189
Location
Undisclosed Northwest location
I am interested in having an electric off road vehicle and here is why: If you have independent electric motors for each wheel (some do, most don't) then drive trains and differentials become obsolete. And you always have full power to every wheel.

As far as how much "pulling power" you could have, modern locomotives use electric motors. The electricity is generated on board by diesel engines.
I worked at a nickel mine years ago and they used diesel electric haul trucks. Thats different than using battery power. I’ve still never heard anything about how long it takes to charge an EV. What kind of charge life do they have when the temp is around zero with the heater/defroster on and in real 4 wheel drive, not part time. How do they preform in the mountains on steep grades, deep snow, pulling a heavy load. I'm hauling a load of cattle to the auction on Friday. Its a 150 mile trip each way with a couple passes on the way. Would an electric truck make that trip? Or would I have to carry a generator with me?
 

EastenerWesterner

God Like
Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2021
Messages
568
Reaction score
1,757
Location
Diablo Range of the Kommunist Republik
I worked at a nickel mine years ago and they used diesel electric haul trucks. Thats different than using battery power. I’ve still never heard anything about how long it takes to charge an EV. What kind of charge life do they have when the temp is around zero with the heater/defroster on and in real 4 wheel drive, not part time. How do they preform in the mountains on steep grades, deep snow, pulling a heavy load. I'm hauling a load of cattle to the auction on Friday. Its a 150 mile trip each way with a couple passes on the way. Would an electric truck make that trip? Or would I have to carry a generator with me?
With most EVs they take a long time 8-12 hrs on 110. Half that on 220. Most of them are crap.
Thats where Tesla has the advantage with Super Chargers. An hour and you are back on the road. Enough time to get a meal and a break.
Getting between the Super Chargers is called range anxiety.

I had range anxiety on my first road trip with a diesel. Planned out my stops.

Going down mountains adds to your range because of regenerative breaking. Going up the 3 mile hill to my house takes 6 miles of range. Going down adds 6-9 miles.
In camper mode, they take very little range off the battery overnight heating or cooling the vehicle.
Torque, performance,and handling was equal to my Porsche Boxster.
It took me a half hour longer in a Tesla with charging on SF-LA run than it did in in a gas SUV. Gas cost 125, electric 20.
These are all experiences with a M3 car. I would guesstimate with a truck in those conditions, you charge at the auction point, get lunch and go back. We won’t know until the trucks come out.
 

DrHenley

Top Poster
Global Moderator
Member
Joined
Sep 7, 2013
Messages
12,554
Reaction score
39,892
Location
Columbus, GA USA
I worked at a nickel mine years ago and they used diesel electric haul trucks. Thats different than using battery power. I’ve still never heard anything about how long it takes to charge an EV. What kind of charge life do they have when the temp is around zero with the heater/defroster on and in real 4 wheel drive, not part time. How do they preform in the mountains on steep grades, deep snow, pulling a heavy load. I'm hauling a load of cattle to the auction on Friday. Its a 150 mile trip each way with a couple passes on the way. Would an electric truck make that trip? Or would I have to carry a generator with me?
Batteries? We don't need no stinking batteries!

:D Electricity doesn't have to come from batteries!
My dream is to have a fuel cell powered vehicle. They will happen, I just don't think I will live long enough to see it happen.
 

Brent S

Top Poster
Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2013
Messages
14,636
Reaction score
32,365
Location
South East US
Electric has more pulling power than diesel or gas. The 4 wheel drive is more capable than traditional cars. There are litera hundreds if less parts to wear or break down. The simplicity is one of the main pros for them. The main drawback is charging. Tesla’s charging station network is really impressive, but still dosent compare to the number of gas stations out there. But it is getting better every day.
 

Brent S

Top Poster
Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2013
Messages
14,636
Reaction score
32,365
Location
South East US
I worked at a nickel mine years ago and they used diesel electric haul trucks. Thats different than using battery power. I’ve still never heard anything about how long it takes to charge an EV. What kind of charge life do they have when the temp is around zero with the heater/defroster on and in real 4 wheel drive, not part time. How do they preform in the mountains on steep grades, deep snow, pulling a heavy load. I'm hauling a load of cattle to the auction on Friday. Its a 150 mile trip each way with a couple passes on the way. Would an electric truck make that trip? Or would I have to carry a generator with me?
The cyber truck has that range and more. I’m not sure what the Ford or Rivian have yet. But all of them are getting better every year. Of course the base models get less range. The higher end ones have truly impressive stats, along with the truly impressive price tags…..
 

Brent S

Top Poster
Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2013
Messages
14,636
Reaction score
32,365
Location
South East US
On the supercharger (Tesla’s own system) you can change for 15 mins and get 200 miles if range from it. That’s not filling the batters but is a pretty decent down time.
 

Arcticdude

A True Doomsday Prepper
Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2013
Messages
8,516
Reaction score
28,189
Location
Undisclosed Northwest location
The cyber truck has that range and more. I’m not sure what the Ford or Rivian have yet. But all of them are getting better every year. Of course the base models get less range. The higher end ones have truly impressive stats, along with the truly impressive price tags…..
Again, how well do they preform in cold weather, deep snow, pulling a heavy load over mountain passes? What do you do when theres no charging stations? I'm not opposed to electric cars or trucks, I just dont see them being viable options for many/most people in rural areas. If the Left gets their dream of eliminating oil, are we all supposed to move to flat land urban areas?
 
Last edited:

Amish Heart

A True Doomsday Prepper
Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2020
Messages
1,963
Reaction score
7,885
Location
Kansas
All I know is that those electric scooters in the grocery stores and hardware stores that my husband needs to use if he goes shopping with me don't have a charge on them if it's after noon, and he gets stranded in the back of the store. A few weeks ago we went through three of them. I'd have to go to the front of the store and get another and drive it to him. Don't believe the "full of battery" light on them, it's lying to you.
 

MOS0231

Demi-God
Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2020
Messages
1,263
Reaction score
3,870
Location
Upstate
On the supercharger (Tesla’s own system) you can change for 15 mins and get 200 miles if range from it. That’s not filling the batters but is a pretty decent down time.
15 minutes for 200 miles.

I want to travel 1,000 miles. Stopping every 200 miles for 15 minutes down time to charge adds an extra hour and 15 minutes to my travel time.
 

Ronald Tucker

New Member
Jr Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2017
Messages
6
Reaction score
19
Location
Buchanan dam texas
Lithium- ion batteries are getting better every year, I've got some cheap 18650 flashlight batteries that are 10 - 12 years old that still hold and take a charge, and some ryobi 4amphr cordless tool battery's that are 8 years old and still get used almost every day, noe I have had two or three of each go bad but after several years of use, I'm waiting for the price of full house batteries to drop to 3-4 thousand so I can use them on my house solar system.
 

Arcticdude

A True Doomsday Prepper
Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2013
Messages
8,516
Reaction score
28,189
Location
Undisclosed Northwest location
15 minutes for 200 miles.

I want to travel 1,000 miles. Stopping every 200 miles for 15 minutes down time to charge adds an extra hour and 15 minutes to my travel time.
Right now I can go 1,000 miles on my truck. It holds 100 gallons of fuel. Who in their right mind would trade that for a 200 mile range? When I'm traveling I dont like to stop. Our kids live 400 miles away. Either one of our Jeeps will make that trip without stopping, with fuel to spare.
 

Brent S

Top Poster
Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2013
Messages
14,636
Reaction score
32,365
Location
South East US
15 minutes for 200 miles.

I want to travel 1,000 miles. Stopping every 200 miles for 15 minutes down time to charge adds an extra hour and 15 minutes to my travel time.
But that’s just a quick charge. If you start at full charge and can go near 500 miles that’s a good start. There is no doubt that electric isn’t ready to replace all gas cars though. But think back to when the model t started. It wasn’t much better than a horse. More novelty than practical. Electric will continue to advance in all areas. There are tremendous advantages with it, but I won’t argue that it’s not there yet.
 

Latest posts

Top