Bullet Proof Vests (cheaper than you thought)

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Gazrok

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Wow, I was just checking ebay for these, and you can pretty much get them for under $100 easy. I was thinking they were MUCH more expensive. At that price, no reason each person in the family can't have one. That is awesome!
 

bigadam

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Can you share the link for the one you saw? I was looking and could only find the bulletproof style none that were actually bulletproof
 

Clyde

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Wow, I was just checking ebay for these, and you can pretty much get them for under $100 easy. I was thinking they were MUCH more expensive. At that price, no reason each person in the family can't have one. That is awesome!
Hopefully the price does not equal its effectiveness.
 

WilliamAshley

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Wow, I was just checking ebay for these, and you can pretty much get them for under $100 easy. I was thinking they were MUCH more expensive. At that price, no reason each person in the family can't have one. That is awesome!
Well if you are getting kevlar be sure to buy new, if you are serious about it, and you think you will get shot. Bear in mind most kevlar vests arn't designed for rifles of the .30 calibre and above type, mostly just small calibre. Check out the NIJ ratings. A vest may be better than no vest but don't expect just to have one and put it on on a rainy day and expect to be tactical in it.

If you think you are actually going to take rifle fire, get plates and a plate carrier, you can also do a vest. IMO though Police flak vests level 3A and above are heavy and imo are only good in cool climates, if you are highly mobile - as it adds to the heat rating big time to be mobile in them, its like wearing a super insulated layer. the thin conceiled vests are a much better buy imo along with a plate carrier that you can put ceramics or metal plates in.

I've heard people mention that certain tire inlays for trucks can also be used.

Just remember kevlar degrades with heat, moisture and time.

I have my vest mostly for training, and the odd chance that gunfire breaks. None the less you don't want to get shot.

Just realize that more or less what you want is a plate carrier and plates (that can be bought real cheap from china in bulk).

The vests add weight and bulk. IMO if you get good plates you are covered for life. Kevlar however needs to be replaced periodically.

tactical gear isn't very practical to wear day to day... concealed body armour is, and plates can be inserted into normal clothing if modified to hold it. bear that in mind when opting for body armour.


Just remember your torso is only one part of your body if you honestly think you are going to get shot, consider getting a helmet that can be used for many different things like climbing, biking etc.. however these are normally only level 3A.. meaning if it is an assault rifle it is a plinker.

Most people don't opt for lower body protection, or arm protection. It costs about $1000 for a set of tactical armour. Also consider a full size legion riot shield to top out the riot body armour.

$100 is cheap but what exactly are you getting and how are you using it?


better than nothing true, but speed can be useful too. Also realize that some jurisidictions have body armour as a controlled product, so it isn't legal to wear or buy everywhere..

keep this in mind if you plan on travelling with it.


its heavy bear in mind what you are going to want it 1" or larger peices of metal like steel.. that are coated to reduce spalling. that is heavy.. think plate mail... it is really a toss up between comfort and protection. You will use more energy with serious armour.. until the carbon nanocomposites hit the market.

think of this type stuff when considering a lifelong armour choice

the carbon stuff is the future..

this is what the elite will have
 

Gazrok

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$100 is cheap but what exactly are you getting and how are you using it?
Example link
http://www.ebay.com/itm/XX-Large-Re...922?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2eca5c5372

As for what I'd use it for: If a firefight was eminent, I'd want each person to have something rather than nothing. For sentries, I'd want to go more with the AR500 style if I can afford it....but this is more as a better than nothing option.
At these prices, it is more obtainable for the whole group first, and then each individual can upgrade, and we'll use the extras for anybody new we add, etc.
 

Ryan_BAO

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Example link
http://www.ebay.com/itm/XX-Large-Re...922?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2eca5c5372

As for what I'd use it for: If a firefight was eminent, I'd want each person to have something rather than nothing. For sentries, I'd want to go more with the AR500 style if I can afford it....but this is more as a better than nothing option.
At these prices, it is more obtainable for the whole group first, and then each individual can upgrade, and we'll use the extras for anybody new we add, etc.
If I was to buy a vest soft or hard plates they would have to be NIJ certified, AR500 has great reviews and nice prices, but I would want to know what I was where was held to a Standard and tested by that. AR500 state they are to NIJ ( why not get their cert?) that's the part that gets me thinking on these companies that don't get cert. So in end I would buy a named vest like Diamondback, Point Blank, Armor Express. ( tri compliant DEA FBI NIJ)
 

WilliamAshley

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Example link
http://www.ebay.com/itm/XX-Large-Re...922?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2eca5c5372

As for what I'd use it for: If a firefight was eminent, I'd want each person to have something rather than nothing. For sentries, I'd want to go more with the AR500 style if I can afford it....but this is more as a better than nothing option.
At these prices, it is more obtainable for the whole group first, and then each individual can upgrade, and we'll use the extras for anybody new we add, etc.
The level 2 will probably only stop lighter pistol rounds.. still better than nothing but most rifles except smaller calibres like .22 will probably penetrate. but yeah still better than nothing and a level 2 is usually lighter and more comfortable. I'd seriously consider "conceiled armoured clothing though" that is what I was considering getting for the casual wear, such as trench coat or armani style suit, or bomber leather jacket.

It is a good first in just to get use to wearing a vest. lots of people who are with hanguns on the street probably ain't going to bother with the wrist strain from a 357 or other large calibre pistol.. imo as long as it stops all common glock rounds you are probably fairly ok street wear protected.
 

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Soft body armor was designed to stop the bullet of the weapon of the LEO that is wearing it. Don't count on any soft body armor to stop any rifle bullets. This includes 22lr bullets. The weave in the kevlar is not tight enough for that small of a caliber.
Military style armor with plates are designed for rifle bullets. They are heavy and cumbersome to wear. In hot climates it brings on other challenges such as heat exhaustion for any type of body armor.

Personally, I strongly encourage everyone to put money into food, water and other preps long before investing into body armor. I base my opinion on the fact I wear body armor daily.
 

WilliamAshley

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Here is a chart but as trapper says consider plates for heavy ballistics, the velocity and grain can come into play on how effective it is

http://www.safeguardclothing.com/nij-levels/

If it is new it will probably work, the more used it is the more questionable it becomes. but definately better than nothing.

body armour is a once in lifetime buy... water filters and a basic supply of food and water should be easy.

having some water is good but a water filter imo is a prority item.

However it can go a long way for moral and build up some mochismo.. in normal times food and water is a given, while you need to ask yourself what type of environment.. also you can't take much food and water with you in a bugout. Having large quantities of food and water will only be useful in a bug in. I think two months supply should be more than anyone will reasonably expect to carry. In event of civil disorder where food is scarce.. you need to ask ok is food my priority or defence?

Having lots of resource and no defence will make yourself a potential target in a civil disorder context. you will likely need to hide your food real good so if you are making hidden caches you either need to make hidden rooms for yourself and in that case it is a deep bugin. Just stocking large quantities of food could work against you, although anything can happen.

body armour doesn't make you superman but it makes you feel it but training in body armour is worth the health value.

You might consider community grow ops, or urban parks or garden initiatives if you don't have a lot of land, even rooftops can be used for growing food, in the long term scenario you might seriously place growing food higher than having food stores because you may be forced to move.

Without large amounts of gasoline you may be unable or it may be more expensive to move food stores than it is to grow the food locally.

None the less body armour is good for both training and wearing day to day.. if you buy it you should wear it, don't just throw it in a closet. actually use it, you probably have a bigger chance of getting shot at random than the chance of doomsday. And when dday hits if you arn't wearing it what good is it?
 

Wiredog8

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I saw a military vest for sale. Point blank brand. Made in January 2006. Has both front and back plates made on August 2004.
Overall condition is near perfect.
Plates are rated for 7.62x51mm M-80 [email protected] and 7.62x54 [email protected] 2300 fps.
Anybody know what the life expectancy of a unit like this is?
They are asking $300.00.
Is this a good buy?
 

Clyde

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Actually, this is true. I pay out about $750-1k every 5 years to get new soft body armor. I would not trust my life to a $100 vest.
I am new to vest ownership.
I was given a vest, and am curious if it is any good..... I have my doubts. It has a manufacture date of October 2001. I was told 5 years is the max you want to keep a vest.
It is made by Point Blank and called the Intercepter OTV. It says it protects against 9mm submachine gun or lesser threats.
 

Trapper

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I am new to vest ownership.
I was given a vest, and am curious if it is any good..... I have my doubts. It has a manufacture date of October 2001. I was told 5 years is the max you want to keep a vest.
It is made by Point Blank and called the Intercepter OTV. It says it protects against 9mm submachine gun or lesser threats.
Point blank makes good body armor. Kevlar degrades mostly from use. It flexes as its worn, body sweat, heat, cold, all of which wears it out. With that said, officers have been shot with 10 year old used body armor and it still did its just and worked fine (on many occasions). If body armor companies said replace it every 10 years they would sell only half as many vests! I replace mine in 5 years as a new vest is more comfortable. The edges will roll on the bottom, especially if the vest is too long for the wearer.
As far as the vest you have WEAR IT until you can get your own. Make sure you get measured for a proper fit or it will bug you and ride up to your throat.
Check into the NIJ standards for ratings. For the most part Level II vests stop a standard pistol round, IIIa will stop magnum rounds. These are in soft body armor Level III & IV are more SWAT & Military grade vests.
My last 2 vests were American Body Armor and Second Chance. The Second chance is holding up better than the ABA. In fairness, the 2nd chance is only 2 1/2 yrs old. I had 6 years in the ABA.
 

Trapper

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I saw a military vest for sale. Point blank brand. Made in January 2006. Has both front and back plates made on August 2004. Overall condition is near perfect. Plates are rated for 7.62x51mm M-80 [email protected] and 7.62x54 [email protected] 2300 fps.
Anybody know what the life expectancy of a unit like this is? They are asking $300.00. Is this a good buy?
That is a military grade vest. It probably saw little use if the carrier is not beat up. The plates can run more than $300. If kept in a cool dry place, out of sun light I would not be afraid of that vest stopping rounds for a long time. For the price, yes its a good deal.
 

Clyde

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Point blank makes good body armor. Kevlar degrades mostly from use. It flexes as its worn, body sweat, heat, cold, all of which wears it out. With that said, officers have been shot with 10 year old used body armor and it still did its just and worked fine (on many occasions). If body armor companies said replace it every 10 years they would sell only half as many vests! I replace mine in 5 years as a new vest is more comfortable. The edges will roll on the bottom, especially if the vest is too long for the wearer.
As far as the vest you have WEAR IT until you can get your own. Make sure you get measured for a proper fit or it will bug you and ride up to your throat.
Check into the NIJ standards for ratings. For the most part Level II vests stop a standard pistol round, IIIa will stop magnum rounds. These are in soft body armor Level III & IV are more SWAT & Military grade vests.
My last 2 vests were American Body Armor and Second Chance. The Second chance is holding up better than the ABA. In fairness, the 2nd chance is only 2 1/2 yrs old. I had 6 years in the ABA.
Thanks for the info. The one I mentioned is a military issue. Came from a high speed unit that shall remain nameless.
 

rudyc

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i once saw a vest at a militry store, a few years ago. it was about a hundred bucks, and the description said, that it may stop a bullet if shot from a great distance, and at an angle from a small caliber. so basically, i have to get shot from a 9 mm bullet, from 2 miles away, and it has to be at a 45 degree angle? same went with the older ww2 and vietnam style helmets
 

Terrance

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This is why I run a AR-5.7 . It's to easy for people to get armor. The round penetrates level three body armor within 200 meters. It also doesn't hurt it holds 50 rounds per mag ;)
 

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