bug out horse?

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gman89

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well me and the misses moved back towards the country due to having a baby on the way and work taking a dump on me. so were now saving money and prepping (stock piling diapers) seeing how were in the country im looking at getting horses again. does anyone plan on using horses for bugging out? i already got my tack and just need to build the fence. an for those of you using your horses what are some tips and tricks you have for me lol
 

Chicknladee

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Gman, talk to anorak! She can steer you in the right direction about horses! Me, I'm saving my iron horses for that purpose should the need arise! However, mine aren't that quiet so I'll need to go like my ### is on fire (loud pipes save lives, except possibly in a BO situation)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk 2 <------- How the heck did this get here????? :eek:
 

Ma'am

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Haha this is something I actually feel very knowledgeable about :)
I have 'backpacking' items to strap onto my horse in the case of needed to go anywhere....I do plan on buggin in, so I dont feel the need to have everything packed to go on a long journey with my horse. I plan on mainly using my horses to carry what I wouldn't be able to for long distances...ie large amnts of water, firewood, tools, ect.
My current set up allows me to strap my BOB, hubbys' BOB, some extra camp gear, and extra water onto my 1200lb AQHA gelding....total weight for him to carry is just over 100 lbs not including water jugs, he us used to carrying crap for me, but I should practice even more with him. My big mare would be for my hubby and I to take turns riding, she weights a whopping 1600lbs and could easily carry both of us if needed. In case we need to abandon the house for a few days...we would be ready and could hide out in the woods rather easily.

...but I dont think in a large bugout situation that a horse would be the best option. Long term caring for a horse while on the move would be difficult. People are going to be desperate, a horse might look like an easy steal for either food or transportation. If someone steals your horse and all or your supplies are strapped on...youre SOL! (I do have a mini BOB for my hubby and I to carry--usually kept in the cars but we would carry in a Bug out situation, just in case :) )

One thing to note that a horse should only carry 20% of their body weight...safely you do not want to ruin your horses back in the middle of a trip!!! It can happen!!!! The average size horse I would guess to weigh between 1100-1300 lbs (medium sized quarter horse type) which means that they should only be carrying 220-260lbs MAX! If you are going longer distances it is not smart to push these weight limits. If I you are serious about using a horse PRACTICE is very important!! Do not expect your horse to do extraordinary things in extraordinary places. Carrying heavy people/supplies in a strange situation can be a recipe for disaster!

If you are going to be getting a horse for each person of the family-plus a horse to carry supplies...be sure to practice! I cannot stress that enough!
Training your horse is super important!

If you have a baby on the way...and are seriously considering using horses for your bug out vehicle-consider getting one that is cart/buggy trained. Having everything you would need for a baby will probably mean you have more supplies to carry along than someone who doesnt. It would also be a smoother trip (not as bumpy) for a small child. Once your little one gets older it would be easier for them to sit on a horse- rather than be carried. I guess if I were you and serious about using horses as a bug out vehicle I would start with a trustworthy cart horse....with a covered buggy (much like the Amish use...lots of storage room) but be aware you would have to stay on the rds/even terrain...carts + bumpy rds are not a pleasant experience.

Lots of other variables to consider...this is just what I have done so far :)
 

Clyde

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well me and the misses moved back towards the country due to having a baby on the way and work taking a dump on me. so were now saving money and prepping (stock piling diapers) seeing how were in the country im looking at getting horses again. does anyone plan on using horses for bugging out? i already got my tack and just need to build the fence. an for those of you using your horses what are some tips and tricks you have for me lol
Talk to old_anorak. She knows quite a bit about horses.
 

old_anorak

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Hello there. We have incorporated horses in our lives now and plan for them as an integral part of survival in the future. Horses do our plowing, harvesting, pulling trees and stumps, pulling sledges of wood up. We do not have a tractor and have absolutely no intention of ever getting one, I can't abide the noise.

We do plan on bugging in. If we have to bug out and can do so with truck and trailer, we will, if not, horses will be hitched to wagons and we're gone.

As to tack, it depends on if you plan to ride and lead a pack animal or if you are driving a hitch; we're doing both. One thing for certain, with a baby, you'd best be damned sure about your riding ability and the temperament of the horse if you plan on riding.

If you plan to use pack animals, consider larger donkeys, they can pack a good deal more than a horse, but you'd have to pony another mount as well.

If you plan to drive them, make sure you have them broke well. My husband does all of our training as well as training for other people and I can tell you that I have seen some horror stories unfold at 'training' some horses get.

How much do you know about horses? How much do you know about vetting? Shoing? Can you trim their feet. How much riding experience do you and your wife have in hard country? In traffic? On snow and ice?

A buggy or wagon would work better with a baby, but again, do you know how to drive a single horse or a team safely?

I'm not trying to come off as an ### to you, I just want to get a feel of what you know and are bringing to the table. Riding at your Uncle's place when you were a kid isn't going to work, but hours in the saddle working cattle, trail riding, walking behind a team, or driving a sledge will. Not everyone has the opportunity to do these things and unfortunately more and more cattle farms are letting the horse go by the wayside in favor for the four wheeler's and helicopters.

I was lucky, I grew up on a working cattle farm, I've been in the saddle almost since I could walk. Grew up riding working cattle horses who knew their jobs and didn't have the patience for a snot nosed kid. You learn quick after you get lawn darted a couple of times.

So seriously, let us know what you know and can do and I'll be more than happy to help you go from there. Everyone should share their breath with a horse, it's good for what ails a body.
 

Gazrok

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If that is your main reason for getting horses, I think you'll soon get out of it. They are expensive to keep. We have two stables on the ranch, 3 of our own horses, and board 3 others. On average, it's about $150 a month to feed and care for one horse (not including if you board them somewhere), and that's getting hay cheaper from farmers, etc. While we are learning farrier work, we currently have a pro do it. The above posters make some good points. Also, having horses will really anchor you to home. You'll have to have someone feed, turn out, and muck the stalls if you go on vacation, etc. so be sure to factor this in.
 

Hockie

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horses are a huge target. If shtf, people will be eating horses. A decent rifleman, with a scope, can hit a horse easily from 600 yds away. Any sort of wound will render the horse unable to do anything, for many weeks, and normally, such a hit will prove fatal in days or hours, if not minutes. A 1500 lbs horse is 800 lbs of meat, 600 lbs of jerky, enough to get a family thru a year of shtf, given a bit of gillnetting, trotlining, snaring, boxtrapping, and knowledge of wild edible plants. So don't kid yourself about horses for shtf, either keeping them or riding them. They are noisy, won't remain still. they get sick or hurt, want to breed, etc. A mountain bicycle (or 3-4) are much more like what is needed. You can hide a bike under a bush, and it will STAY THERE, :) Nobody will shoot it or want to eat it. With a 1/2 can of "slime" in each tire, it won't get flats, and there's solid rubber bike tires. You can walk along side of it, with 30 lbs on your back and 120 lbs on the bike, thru some really bad terrain, and if you get a downhill slope, you can coast. If you get a road-like surface, you can pedal.
 

Hockie

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It will be fine, until shtf. I lived in CO for 4 years. Horses are expensive and a hassle, but many people love them. A company in Pagosa Springs, down by Durango, had a telemarketing "boilerroom" full of people who were constantly on the phone to horselovers all over the world, selling kits of gear, training time at the local range, etc. Parelli's, is the name. People love their horses.
 

old_anorak

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I have no use for Parelli or any of that bunny hugging crap. Horses are livestock just like goats and cattle; all can be used in different ways and all taste pretty good.
 

Hockie

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me, too. My dad's dad, when pop was a kid, used to buy horses that were destined for the glue factory, paying $2 apiece, back during the Depression. Dad said that they worked them or they shot them. If one had to be broken, dad would get on it after leading it to the creek, and getting it forelock deep in wed sand, with an old style coke bottle full of warm water in each pocket of his coveralls. If they broke bad on him, he'd bust a bottle over their head. The wetness and the crunch sound had a real mellowing effect,and the wet sand/mud soon tired them out (and made for a soft landing if he got thrown). :)

My Dad had the most vicious temper I have ever seen, when it came down to some animal hurting him. He never got out of hand with us kids, but I saw him cut off a cow's horns with a hacksaw, after she tried to gore him. They have lots of nerves in those horns! Sheesh. Another time, a cow he was trying to hand milk tried to smash him between her hip and the wooden stall. he snatched up the wooden "t" stool and beat her til she hung by her neck in the stanchion. After that, somebody else had to milk her, cause she'd go crazy at just the sight of him.
 

Shenandoah

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While you do have valid points, I will stay with my horses. It's just me and my preference. Not for everyone. Besides, I can't ride a bike.
Agreed. We farm about 80% with our Clydesdales and ride and work the ranch with the others. I will stick with my horses as well. Although, I do keep a bike locked in the back of my truck as part of my Get-Home Plan! I figure it will be quicker and quieter than stealing a horse....
Old Anorak--How is that foot coming along? So glad it wasn't the Saddlebred that biffed it with ya, I'm guessing that Haflinger cross is a good ride.

Blessings,
Shenandoah
 

old_anorak

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It's healing, doctor's say that the infection around the wires and screws is gone, now I'm just healing from the inside out. Yeah, Jonah is a hell of a horse, he tried to keep it upright and managed to for about halfway down before things just went tits up. I'm just glad he has a good head on him and didn't do any thrashing around when he landed on me. Just waited a few minutes and rolled to the side before getting to his feet. He's a good boy, earned himself a watermelon and a bottle of rootbeer.
 

Gazrok

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My horse's favorite is sweet tea. She'll drink that all day long if I let her, hehe.

I'd love to see someone try and ride a mountain bike around here....especially after a good rain (you'd sink in the ground). I can ride a bike just fine, and have one, but post SHTF, when the diesel runs out, we're on horseback all the way.
 

Shenandoah

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It's healing, doctor's say that the infection around the wires and screws is gone, now I'm just healing from the inside out. Yeah, Jonah is a hell of a horse, he tried to keep it upright and managed to for about halfway down before things just went tits up. I'm just glad he has a good head on him and didn't do any thrashing around when he landed on me. Just waited a few minutes and rolled to the side before getting to his feet. He's a good boy, earned himself a watermelon and a bottle of rootbeer.
Wow! What a ride!
Just glad it is healing now. Truly, my preference for a trail ride is a mule. They get a bad wrap for being stubborn but its just cause they are smarter than horses and generally smarter than their rider! They just won't put themselves in a spot to get hurt....love that about em, that and those magnificent ears! All our clydes are broke to ride as well and certainly the drafts are a much smoother ride than a dang quarter horse with those short cannon bones beating me up and down. Plus, riding a clydesdale makes my butt look smaller!
We have a clyde names Jonah...got his name cause he was big as a whale at birth! The only foal we have ever had to pull!
Glad to hear you are up and at it again!!

Blessings,
Shenandoah
 

Gazrok

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Wendy-Fancy.jpg
Wendy-Laredo.jpg

The wife with our "bug out horses"
On the left, she's on my horse, "Fancy", on the right, her horse, "Laredo"
We have another, a paint (not the one in the first pic), named "Kay-tee" but I don't have a good uploaded pic of her.
 

Gazrok

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Thanks! Notice all the pink zebra stuff on her (male) horse? He must be mortified....hehe...even the saddle seat has that motif.
 

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