Homeschooling Info

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ChancesR

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I noticed there isnt a section on education prepping... I dont have kids but I think a place to find ideas and know what to get to be prepared would be good. So abacus, chalk boards, chalk, text books, and such would be something to think about. What would you have on hand, know how to do, and any advice would you give?
 

Mountain*Heart

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My daughter and I had given that thought on how would we go on with an education for my 3 yr old granddaughter. While Border's books was going out of sale we made out like a bandit on several learning books. We have gotten a few slates and chalk also have several different kinds of flash cards that are dry erase. Through garage sales and thrift stores I have managed to find writing tablets for elementary and have reams of school paper. Going on the assumption that the electricity will probably go out we set out sites on good old fashioned learning materials. We have readers of different levels and learning encyclopedias of different levels.
Also, thinking of a bug out situation we have travel size flash cards that are dry erase and travel size activity pads with more leaning than play in it. Those are just a few ideas and for the most part most of the supplies are inexpensive and aren't to hard to find yet, most I have found at the cheap dollar stores or yard sales.
 

Danil54grl

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homeschooling can a be a far more frugal proposition than school! Even in public school there is a constant stream of things to pay for, not to mention the clothes and shoes the child ‘must’ apparently have. There is tons of free curriculum out there, but I used a beka curriculam
 

Gazrok

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Excellent topic!

I can't say that I'd recommend complete home-schooling though. Maybe for the first couple grade levels, but after that, I think kids need to be in public school (or private, if you got the scratch).

The reason has nothing to do with curriculum, but EVERYTHING to do with the most important skill of all....LEARNING TO DEAL WITH PEOPLE IN THE REAL WORLD. This cannot be taught at home. The world has bullies, cliques, crushes, rules, etc. and a kid who doesn't learn how to deal with all of it as they are developing is going out into the world as a sheep amongst the wolves....in my opinion. Sure, he or she will be smarter than most of the other kids, but they'll also find their underwear on a flagpole....

Post SHTF though, having the tools available to teach new generations would be pretty darn important, and likely a key missing part to most of our preps. A good set of real, honest to goodness encyclopedias is a good start. Get one at a yard sale, for example. Can find schoolbooks used online for dirt cheap.

Love the idea of the chalkboards and flash cards. Nice thinking!
 

Cerberus

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I'm no expert but I can share what I wish I had and how I would do it. I do tend to write in an instructional tone. but by no means do I claim to know what is best for your child. I merely post to share my point of view on things and to give you an insight, in what I would do, so you might gain ideas that you believe might work for your child.

I always felt envious of teens in america when I was that age. I would have loved to go to one of those military middle schools. but my country had none.
If I had a son or daughter who was into prepping or survival related things or just loved military stuff like I did, I would first start with homeschooling and then send them to one of those academy's for middle school. I wouldn't be too happy if they signed up for the military after that but I would support them if they did.

If I look at the kind of education I wanted at the time, and even wish I would have had now it would be this:
- Homeschooling till middle school, with my parents also teaching me the basic electronics, basic mechanics and survival skills.
- Military Academy & boarding-school (middle school/high school)
- College

In case you argue that skills are too much for kids under 12 years old, let me explain the reason. I hated elementary school. The reason for it was that I did not get to learn practical things. for some kids, this can be really frustrating, pure theory is not fun for everyone. for some, like me, if you cannot put it to the test and see the results, it is pure agony. this is further enforced when you read a book and kids in those books get to be an apprentice something and learn and DO all sorts of cool stuff.

So the suggestion is: If you want to teach your kids through homeschooling, teach them practical things as much as theory. As for things to teach with, having some math, physics, biology, history and english books for each "grade" would be quite useful. An atlas for geography would also be a good idea. you should however keep a keen eye out for what your child enjoys doing. If your child for example really digs a subject, you should buy some more advanced books if he gobbles it all up.

Teaching your child a second language would be also be a useful skill. Consider Russian, German, Spanish or Chinese. Each of these languages is quite useful to learn on an early age.
As for history, put focus on battles, strategies and culture of each side.

I also recommend YOU to learn the basics of Neuro-Linguistic Programming, or at least to keep an eye out for the thought process of your child, you can discover this in his/her use of words. Knowing whether your child is a visual , auditive or kinaesthetic learner, will help you when explaining things to your child and helping your child to learn and understand what you teach them.
 

Gazrok

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I bounced back and forth a lot between public schools, military base schools, and private schools as a kid. Ideally, I'm glad I had the experience from all of them.

I do wish I had learned a second language earlier though, MUCH easier from what I've seen, to do this when young. Spanish is almost a given here in the US, but conversational Chinese would also be a wise move. At least I'm getting more practice with my Spanish though (in a rural area, migrant workers, etc.)
 

ChancesR

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As some with a learn disability I would rather have been home schooled every school I went to harassed me including teachers and Administration backed them up.
 

PrairieWife

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We homeschool!

I hoard crayons, pencils, and note books during back to school sales (sometimes I get them for only a penny!). As a homeschool mother you are a "teacher" so often times if you register as a teacher at the stores the "limits" of the amount you are allowed to buy do NOT apply to you! And you can buy limitless special buys. I also buy tons and tons and tons of books. Usually between free, and 25 cents at the local library. They sell used books to raise money.

Going to school does NOT teach socialization. There is very little social time at school period today. (they have to learn to pass tests, there is no social time, in fact they get punished for socializing.) And beyond that, the class room is the ONLY situation where a person will be surrounded by only people their own age group. Every where else in life they will be surrounded by a variety of people of ages, and such. Usually not just the ones in their own neighborhood either.

My children are VERY social. They can go up and speak to any one. Often times adults are shocked at my children's willingness to go up and speak and carry a conversation with grown adults. Where most kids their age only want to talk to children their own age (because they are so well socialized. lol). My kids can speak and have fun with various age groups. Not just their own peers. Because my children get to be themselves at home, and out and about in our city (just cause we homeschool doesn't mean we don't leave the house) they get a lot of time for creativity and exercising their brains more then the average student who only gets to learn what is on the school boards agenda (Which is to make worker bees for the country). My kids actually read for fun! lol haha

But, any way we love homeschooling, and really you don't need a lot to school children if we had to with out the grid. For now we just do things with the grid, but I have enough crayons, pencils, and note books plus a chalk board and dry erase board that we could school for years with out problems. Especially with all the books we have.
 

Gazrok

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Going to school does NOT teach socialization. There is very little social time at school period today.
Not true, there are 10 minutes between each period, so at least an hour total, and then there's lunch. Not to mention, before and after the school day.

It isn't about just being able to talk to others...it's about how to deal with others...others who do NOT have the kid's best interests at heart, etc. Shielding a child from these folks means that when facing the real world later, they will be like lambs sent to the wolves (in my opinion). Don't get me wrong, I'm a big fan of home schooling, especially for early development. However, I just don't feel it should be the ONLY school a child experiences.

The other caveat is that different teachers bring their own life experiences, teaching styles, and knowledge to the table. This benefit is not present in a home-schooling environment with the variety of just one or two parents.

Of course, in a SHTF scenario, not much choice, but in the current world...I'd favor a mix of both.
 

PrairieWife

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Studies show you are very very wrong. There is many more social places that last longer then a hour for homeschool children each day.

Most homeschool children are not just taught by mom and dad either. Most parents seek many educational avenues for their children besides at home. That's the great thing about homeschooling. Today many schools no longer have field trips (leave the school) where homeschoolers are often in the community. Where they are exposed to many dynamics.

The stats show very little lambs to slaughter with homeschoolers-where it's quite the opposite with public school-because they are taught to go with the flow of all the other "lambs", and to worry about peer pressure etc. Studies show homeschooled children are usually the leaders when they grow up instead of the followers "lambs".
 

PrairieWife

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BTW I dont know what 10 minute between period place you live in. it wasn't even 10 minutes when I went to school we had 90 seconds for class changes when I was in school....which we had to haul butt to get to the next class in that 90 seconds there was no time for socializing. We also didn't have a cafeteria in my school so we did not have "lunch".

I think maybe you don't have a very wide scope of different schools different places....
 

PrairieWife

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BTW, it is ok that you don't agree with homeschooling, that is fine not every one does. However, I just simply want to state many of your reasons you state, are very contrary to the facts. I would suggest researching things, before just blinding having opinions that you are stating as facts.
 

Gazrok

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I think maybe you don't have a very wide scope of different schools different places....
I've gone to home schooling, public schooling, and private schooling from Alaska to Saudi Arabia, including undergrad and graduate college. Pretty hard to get a wider scope there...lol....

I would suggest researching things, before just blinding having opinions that you are stating as facts.
One of the first things you learn in college is that statistics are lies damn lies. Any half-talented statistician can pretty much make the data sing whatever tune the sponsor of the study wants to hear, so can't put much stock in them. Compared to knowing kids with only home-schooling who then had no idea how to deal with bullies, clique behavior, and pretty people skating by on looks vs. talent/skills, etc. School crushes, teachers they like, teachers they hate, success in front of others, failure in front of others. All of whom you have to see the next day, no choice in the matter (just like you would at a job). Not sure how any of these would pan out well for home school.

I never said it was bad. I believe some home-schooling is an excellent idea. I just disagree with it being the ONLY avenue for a child's entire education. At some point, little Billy needs to learn how to swim with the sharks. Disagree all you want, but everyone is entitled to their own opinion. And you know full well that for a study that shows one thing, you can find another showing the opposite.

I certainly agree with your points on the pros of home-schooling. I just argue that doing both helps you preserve the pros, while also downplaying the cons.

Where most kids their age only want to talk to children their own age (because they are so well socialized. lol). My kids can speak and have fun with various age groups. Not just their own peers. Because my children get to be themselves at home, and out and about in our city (just cause we homeschool doesn't mean we don't leave the house) they get a lot of time for creativity and exercising their brains more then the average student who only gets to learn what is on the school boards agenda (Which is to make worker bees for the country). My kids actually read for fun! lol haha
Totally agree on those points though!
 

PrairieWife

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But, it seems to me that you think that homeschooled children are only at home. There's plenty of swimming with sharks outside of the walls of a school.

They can have and see all the points you brought up in every day life.

We go to church ("teachers" are there, people that they can have "crushes" on, my children also do public speaking at church and then have to see those people again with in the week (we go to church at least 2 times a week often more). Etc etc.... Many homeschoolers go to outside things that exposes them to more then just mom and dad-church, clubs, sport teams, art classes, debate teams, etc etc.

I think people have some idea that children are never exposed to other people unless they are in a brick and mortar school. Which is totally untrue for most home schooled children.

However, this is just words on a board, so it's hard to read faces etc.... I am not trying to be mean, just that I don't think the things you say have any validation to real life homeschoolers.

Right now I can tell you with CC that you are going to see a lot of lambs.....in public school systems.
 

Gazrok

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No doubt. (on a lot of folks being lambs). Great points on the outside activities. Just the few I know who had homeschooling all their childhood DIDN'T have that exposure, so they ended up as some really odd ducks as adults. Heck, they were only permitted to see G movies, even into their teens. Really? Granted, they were more victim to their parents' strangeness there.

I am not trying to be mean, just that I don't think the things you say have any validation to real life homeschoolers.
Each case is different of course. Neither of our ideas can be applied to ALL home-schooled children. I'm happy to hear yours seem to be well-adjusted, sociable, and likely much more advanced than equally aged kids who know nothing other than public school.
 

PrairieWife

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I also think that people point to a few weird homeschooled children they know and say see that means homeschooling makes them socially awkward. While ignoring all the weird public school children...no one blames public school for those weird ones. lol

I personally know many homeschooled and public schooled adults, from the ones I personally know there is more public schooled children who are socially awkward then homeschooled ones. Just my own observations.

But, yes each case is individual and different. One thing I have noticed in public school is when a child is suffering from being "socially weird/awkward" rarely does that get addressed. And with homeschooling one on one a parent could work on that. I know two children right now, who are severely delayed socially. The older one is in high school, and still throws temper tantrums like a 2 year old. She has no friends at school, she can't do simple basic math-doesn't know how much money she needs at dollar tree, or how to tell time. Yet her parents don't see anything "wrong" with her, and she is a "honor roll" student. Easy way apparently for the teachers to just keep on passing her on. She was getting F's at the beginning of this year, but the mom told me she went and had a talk with the teachers and now her daughter is making A's again....um yeah.... ok. Her mom said she had always been on honor roll and didn't see why she would be making F's now....um let's see she is 15 and can't count dollars or tell time, or even spell her own last name.... hmmmm quandary there. lol Sad thing is my 4 year old is ahead of her maturity and knowledge wise both. :( Would this child be any different homeschooled with her mother? Probably not, since she doesn't think the child has a problem. Which is sad.

And yes, my oldest is very very advanced, more then likely a genius. (believe me not easy!). My younger two are normal children. lol haha Not advanced, but not slow either. All of them are very very socially adept though. And get along well with any group they are thrown into fast and easily.

I do know a "few" weird homeschooling families no doubt. But, as you stated, sometimes that has to do with the family themselves being weird. Not to do with the education they choose. Cause quite frankly the family would still be weird if they sent Johnny to public school as well.
 
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BTW, it is ok that you don't agree with homeschooling, that is fine not every one does. However, I just simply want to state many of your reasons you state, are very contrary to the facts. I would suggest researching things, before just blinding having opinions that you are stating as facts.
And one could say, " you should learn from your own words." Not to be rude, but you did just what you said you shouldn't do! Reread your last sentence:confused:
 

Gazrok

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she is 15 and can't count dollars or tell time, or even spell her own last name..
I know, right? I quiz my step-kids all the time while out. They just don't teach kids how to do math right these days. I do stuff in my head all the time, that simply astounds them, when no reason they can't either. The kids are "technically" adults, just barely, and that's when I pretty much became their dad, so I had no earlier input here.

just what you said you shouldn't do! Reread your last sentence
Semantics, not trying to have a scholarly debate here, hehe.... Out of curiosity, I did check some studies, and most are pro-home schooling, however the downside is that they are EXTREMELY non-objective, and have obvious agenda-based fact-stacking and bias. How some of them can even be considered in academia is nothing short of a mystery to me.
 

PrairieWife

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Yes it is so sad.

And Math! It's getting worse with CC! CC is going to allow a "wrong" answer to be marked as right as long as they did their work in the order that was asked. I'm sorry math is wrong or right, there is no "point of view" answer with math! That is going to be completely stupid, in a few years when these people are adults.

In my own city, they took cursive/script writing out the schools 20 years ago (thankfully I had already graduated by then! lol) and now we have a whole generation of adults in my area who can not read nor write script. My husband went to the Notary a month ago as we are in the process of buying a home. And the Notary told him, he was the first person in three months who knew how to sign his own name and not just "print" their name. And that the notary has to tell people he can not notarized a printed signature, that they have to "sign" their name, and he just gets blank looks and told they don't know any other way! That is SAD! My children are in elementary school and we start script/cursive in grade 1! I knew though when I heard 20 years ago that they were taking it out of the curriculum that was a stupid idea (it's because it can't go on gov. tests and brings no money into the school so they won't teach it), I knew that was going to be bad when that generation grew up. And now look. Idiotic! We had to "sign" about 200 pieces of paper to get this home...I don't know if this generation will be able to buy a house, since they can't sign their names! Another sad cometary is the real estate agent was going over each piece of paper with us, and we were discussing every paper before signing and reading it all before signing. And she said some where around page 50, wow I can't believe you are still reading...most my customers by around page 20 stop reading and just blindly start signing, with their eyes glazed over. Um....really these papers weren't rocket science and were easy to read, and fast to read....why some one would sign papers with out reading boggles my mind! But then again.....
 

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