Helpful Info. Solo camping security ?

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ShadowWolf 13

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To the DPF community;

Next year spring - autumn I'm considering or planning a few solo camping & hiking trips some will be weekend trips to local state parks, others would be overnights near or along a local river and one has the potential to be roughly a hundred twenty mile roundtrip hike. When I go I'll have a camping kit containing the following items;

1. 8 x 10 tarp, 8' ( X 2 4' ) bungee cords and tent stakes. - ( shelter )
2. Two 16oz. stainless steel water bottles, stainless steel canteen and Sawyer mini water filter. - ( water )
3. Assorted Mountain House or non parishable meals ( instant oatmeal, coffee etc. and 5pcs. mess kit. - (food)
4. Assorted hand / pocket tools ( multi tool, knives etc. ). - ( Tools )
5. Handheld GPS w/ extra batteries, compass, Atlas, small notebook & #2 pencil. - (navigation )
6. Cell phone & solar charger. - ( emergencies )
7. 20L backpack and change of clothing ( T-shirts, cargo pants ) and comfy shoes.

my question is how to best ensure my security primarily at night when asleep had thought about simply keeping a knife within easy reach?

Your thoughts on night time personal security and my gear are greatly appreciated and thanks for your time and assistance.
 

Arcticdude

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To the DPF community;

Next year spring - autumn I'm considering or planning a few solo camping & hiking trips some will be weekend trips to local state parks, others would be overnights near or along a local river and one has the potential to be roughly a hundred twenty mile roundtrip hike. When I go I'll have a camping kit containing the following items;

1. 8 x 10 tarp, 8' ( X 2 4' ) bungee cords and tent stakes. - ( shelter )
2. Two 16oz. stainless steel water bottles, stainless steel canteen and Sawyer mini water filter. - ( water )
3. Assorted Mountain House or non parishable meals ( instant oatmeal, coffee etc. and 5pcs. mess kit. - (food)
4. Assorted hand / pocket tools ( multi tool, knives etc. ). - ( Tools )
5. Handheld GPS w/ extra batteries, compass, Atlas, small notebook & #2 pencil. - (navigation )
6. Cell phone & solar charger. - ( emergencies )
7. 20L backpack and change of clothing ( T-shirts, cargo pants ) and comfy shoes.

my question is how to best ensure my security primarily at night when asleep had thought about simply keeping a knife within easy reach?

Your thoughts on night time personal security and my gear are greatly appreciated and thanks for your time and assistance.
If your in bear country be sure to hang your food in a tree at night. I'd bring a minimum of a .357 magnum pistol, and or a back pack carbine of the same caliber. How about some hooks and line for fishing? Maybe a few rabbit snares on your longer hikes.
 

ShadowWolf 13

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If your in bear country be sure to hang your food in a tree at night. I'd bring a minimum of a .357 magnum pistol, and or a back pack carbine of the same caliber. How about some hooks and line for fishing? Maybe a few rabbit snares on your longer hikes.
Definitely will consider a small fishing kit on the longer hikes I'll be hiking in the southern tier region of upstate NY ( Broome county ) and some in N. East Pennsylvania ( Wayne county ) so minimal bear risk thanks for your response
 
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Arcticdude

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Good catch I will definitely have a sleeping bag or camping blanket in my kit although it's not on the list thanks for your reply
I like using a canvas bedroll, such as from Montana Canvas, with a couple wool blankets rather a sleeping bag. Of course you can use a sleeping bag in a canvas bedroll too for extra warmth.
They weigh a little over 7 pounds so it may be more weight than you want to carry.
 

randolphrowzee

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Hundred twenty miles isn't an extremely long hike, but for anything over a couple of days the first concern should be your foot gear. You can't enjoy yourself if your feet are hurting, so get good foot gear and make sure you break them in. For rain gear, I like a lightweight poncho. Can't enjoy yourself if you're soaking wet and cold.
I've spent lots of time on the AT, and the best bear repellent I've ever found is an M80 or other loud firecracker and a few smoke bombs. A bag of a dozen weighs next to nothing. Bears and wild hogs can't see very well, but they have good hearing and sense of smell. They'll smell or hear you long before they see you, so dropping a fire cracker or smoke bomb close to them has always worked for me. If you keep your food properly secured the bears won't have much interest in you.
Unfortunately, there are lots of accounts of meth heads and other druggies and lowlifes hanging around trails, so I always carry a small firearm to discourage them when necessary. If some seedy looking character just walks into your camp it's best to send him on his way.
 

ShadowWolf 13

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Hundred twenty miles isn't an extremely long hike, but for anything over a couple of days the first concern should be your foot gear. You can't enjoy yourself if your feet are hurting, so get good foot gear and make sure you break them in. For rain gear, I like a lightweight poncho. Can't enjoy yourself if you're soaking wet and cold.
I've spent lots of time on the AT, and the best bear repellent I've ever found is an M80 or other loud firecracker and a few smoke bombs. A bag of a dozen weighs next to nothing. Bears and wild hogs can't see very well, but they have good hearing and sense of smell. They'll smell or hear you long before they see you, so dropping a fire cracker or smoke bomb close to them has always worked for me. If you keep your food properly secured the bears won't have much interest in you.
Unfortunately, there are lots of accounts of meth heads and other druggies and lowlifes hanging around trails, so I always carry a small firearm to discourage them when necessary. If some seedy looking character just walks into your camp it's best to send him on his way.
Thanks for the reply
 

GaRp58

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When I was backpacking, I had to hoist my food up into the trees about 10 ft high to keep any animals away from smelling it/stealing it.
I ran a string around my camp area about 20ft in diameter and hung little cans on it with a few rocks I find daily at each camping place. Anything walking against the string would either shake the cans or make them drop to the ground and make noise. The cans do not need to be hung up in the air, it is good enough it they are standing on rocks, logs or on the ground and just get knocked over when the string gets moved against them. Try a few different things, improve my ideas and come up with your own...true survival is being able to take what you have or what your find and use it for something that the original user NEVER THOUGHT OF!!!! Remember, the best alarms are those which are from the materials you find where you happen to be and not those which show up with funny colors, materials or out-of-place objects...
Being in the wild, your senses are much keener and your reactions quicker- IF you decide to sleep with a knife...make sure it is either not sharp or make sure it is still in a quick sheath, you can turn over in the middle of the night and cut your self.
Most knife owners still believe the Rambo and Bear Grylls crap that big knives need to be sharp enough to shave...BS. Your pocket knife needs to cut string and leather, your sheath knife needs to shave wood or cut rope. That is enough, get a razor if you wanna shave.
If there are dried leaves in your camp,(look for the right spot to sleep) or lots of dry sticks, run a trail of sticks and leaves around your sleeping area which will make enough noise to wake you up if something/body is near.
You will have very little time to react if the area is too small.
There are also very good little alarm systems you can take with you and set up around your camping area... here are a few ideas, the mouse trap idea is one of the easiest and cheeeeeeap too! You do not need to use the snap lights tho, just the closing sound of the trap will wake you up too, Have fun, Gary
 
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backandbeyond

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my question is how to best ensure my security primarily at night when asleep had thought about simply keeping a knife within easy reach?
Well with that avatar and username I would have thought you'd have this nailed shut. Just goes to show, avatars and usernames are meaningless hey. But take a tip from yours all the same, a wolf won't sleep out in the open and you'll likely never see one, so camp accordingly, tucked off in the shrubs and forgo the luxury of the firepit this trip.
 

Dave2001

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To the DPF community;

Next year spring - autumn I'm considering or planning a few solo camping & hiking trips some will be weekend trips to local state parks, others would be overnights near or along a local river and one has the potential to be roughly a hundred twenty mile roundtrip hike. When I go I'll have a camping kit containing the following items;

1. 8 x 10 tarp, 8' ( X 2 4' ) bungee cords and tent stakes. - ( shelter )
2. Two 16oz. stainless steel water bottles, stainless steel canteen and Sawyer mini water filter. - ( water )
3. Assorted Mountain House or non parishable meals ( instant oatmeal, coffee etc. and 5pcs. mess kit. - (food)
4. Assorted hand / pocket tools ( multi tool, knives etc. ). - ( Tools )
5. Handheld GPS w/ extra batteries, compass, Atlas, small notebook & #2 pencil. - (navigation )
6. Cell phone & solar charger. - ( emergencies )
7. 20L backpack and change of clothing ( T-shirts, cargo pants ) and comfy shoes.

my question is how to best ensure my security primarily at night when asleep had thought about simply keeping a knife within easy reach?

Your thoughts on night time personal security and my gear are greatly appreciated and thanks for your time and assistance.
NEVER go camping or backpacking without a firearm anymore!!!
 

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