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Navajo flatbread

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BillMasen

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Bread Shortage - Easiest Kind of Bread You Can Make
March 18, 2020Dena Kennedy





BREAD SHORTAGE?
This is the easiest kind of bread you can make. Costs pennies and can get you through these strange times, my family lived off these when the pickings were slim.
Navajo Flatbread:
Makes 6

2 cups flour
1 - 1 1/4cup of lukewarm water
1 table spoon baking powder
1 tsp kosher salt
1 table spoon oil/butter/shortening

Mix dry ingredients together and add most water, mix and add water until it has the consistency of tacky pizza dough.
Knead for a few minutes.
Let rest in greased bowl for 30- 60 minutes.
Divide into 6 pieces and roll out on floured surface thin. (Tortilla thickness)
Hear griddle to 350F.
Cook until golden brown spots and flip, cooking until done.
They can be made ahead and kept under a flour towel or frozen for later use.
Hope this helps.
 

Buttoni

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I have a couple recipes for Native American fry bread at our BOL. Plan to try both of them soon. I'm of Cherokee descent and have eaten fry bread at my grandmother's (1/2 Cherokee) when I was a little girl. We both love it! Reminds me of Indian naan bread at Indian restaurants, actually. And you're right.........it's the easiest bread in the world that doesn't require yeast and rising to make. My kind of bread!
 
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GeorgiaPeachie

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I have a couple recipes for Native Americah fry bread at our BOL. Plan to try both of them soon. I'm of Cherokee descent and have eaten fry bread at my grandmother's (1/2 Cherokee) when I was a little girl. We both love it! Reminds me of Indian naan bread at Indian restaurants, actually. And you're right.........it's the easiest bread in the world that doesn't require yeast and rising to make. My kind of bread!
I am too Buttoni. There are more of us of Cherokee descent that I thought when younger. My grandmother was full Cherokee.
 

Buttoni

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I am too Buttoni. There are more of us of Cherokee descent that I thought when younger. My grandmother was full Cherokee.
I have done considerable geneaological research on my great grandmother on numerous sites and through the Indian Rolls. There is one person with her name on one of the rolls, but no way to be sure if it was her or not. Best I can tell, her family likely migrated from Alabama, through northern Georgia (maybe we have common ancestors even, LOL) and then ended up in the Goldsboro N.C. area where she met and married my great grandfather. Her family did not migrate to Oklahoma with the great migration to Oklahoma, but remained in the Goldsboro area. Of course, back then, people didn't talk about Indian heritage, in public or private, really. There was a social stigma attached to such lineage. Mom's family didn't talk about their Indian heritage much and the descendants my age and younger are all desirous of and struggling to find any information on her. She lived in a time when the family bibles were often the only source of family tracing. NC didn't even keep state records until 1917!
 

GeorgiaPeachie

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I have done considerable geneaological research on my great grandmother on numerous sites and through the Indian Rolls. There is one person with her name on one of the rolls, but no way to be sure if it was her or not. Best I can tell, her family likely migrated from Alabama, through northern Georgia (maybe we have common ancestors even, LOL) and then ended up in the Goldsboro N.C. area where she met and married my great grandfather. Her family did not migrate to Oklahoma with the great migration to Oklahoma, but remained in the Goldsboro area. Of course, back then, people didn't talk about Indian heritage, in public or private, really. There was a social stigma attached to such lineage. Mom's family didn't talk about their Indian heritage much and the descendants my age and younger are all desirous of and struggling to find any information on her. She lived in a time when the family bibles were often the only source of family tracing. NC didn't even keep state records until 1917!
The part of my Cherokee heritage goes through NC and then West Virginia to Ohio. And you are correct, Grandma did not want to talk about that much. They did not go west with the others. While I look Irish and English, my sons look totally Cherokee as my Grandmother did. Daughter is pure German with bright blue eyes and pale skin like me.
 

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