Canning Meat

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DrHenley

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In the event of an extended power outage, I've got a lot of venison in the freezer that will need to be preserved somehow. I have already experimented with making jerky, but I think I will want to can some of it.

This is something I know nothing about and need some suggestions.
 

doc pops

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OK in my search for meatloaf and sausage canning recipes, I have found out sausage '' not so good '' ! But make meatloaf just like you normally would and cold pack in wide mouth jars pressure cook at (10#) ten lbs of pressure depending on your elevation for 90 min. We are going to try to down size on freezer space and can.
Just about through with velveta cheese in 1/2 pints, next butter. Thanks to old_anorak and Chicknladee. Will post pics and results
 

Kenprep1979

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u can pickle hot dogs and most pork . u could probably pickle most any meat but those are the ones that i know taste good pickled anyway
 

doc pops

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Thanks, I will look into that when I get back to the deep south, in the land of rocks and plains helping my son and family move from Cali to Ga./ Ft. Stewart.
Thanks again
Good luck, be safe, and God bless
 

Shenandoah

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In the event of an extended power outage, I've got a lot of venison in the freezer that will need to be preserved somehow. I have already experimented with making jerky, but I think I will want to can some of it.

This is something I know nothing about and need some suggestions.
Hey DrHenley!
I can all our meat! I can elk and deer every season, then I don't have to care what the grid does, worry about freezer burn, etc. and canning it takes the "game" taste completely out of it! I frequently take it to church dinners passed off as Beef Stew or a Beef Roast and no-one has ever been the wiser. Its pretty easy to do in a pressure canner. Let me know if you want a recipe or two!

Blessings,
Shenandoah
 

Shenandoah

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Hey DrHenley!
I can all our meat! I can elk and deer every season, then I don't have to care what the grid does, worry about freezer burn, etc. and canning it takes the "game" taste completely out of it! I frequently take it to church dinners passed off as Beef Stew or a Beef Roast and no-one has ever been the wiser. Its pretty easy to do in a pressure canner. Let me know if you want a recipe or two!

Blessings,
Shenandoah
It occurred to me that if I didn't get you these recipes now....may not ever get back to it!!
Deer/Elk:
I cut the meat into large 2-3" pieces. You can either raw pack the meat or hot pack the meat. The difference is time and a tad more effort!! Raw pack is just that, cut up the meat and pack it into your jars. Hot pack entails browning the meat in a skillet with a bit of oil before packing them into the jars. Hot pack is prettier in the jars...thats really the only difference I see!! For the most part, we raw pack everything. Another tip: Use wide-mouth jars for meat, when possible. You can get a bit more in each jar and its just easier to get the meat in and out of the jar if you are using wide-mouths.
In each quart jar I put a good size slice of onion and a slice of a pepper, any pepper: bell or banana. I then add 1 cube of beef boulion, a tsp of salt. Fill each with boiling water, leaving 3/4" headspace. Wipe the rim of the jar clean and apply lid. (Keep your lids simmering or sitting in hot water so they go onto the jars hot) Screw down the ring firmly. Process the quarts for 90 minutes at 10 lbs of pressure in a pressure canner. *If you are processing pints, half the above receipe and process for 75 minutes.

Fish:
(Trout, Salmon, Whatever)
Clean and skin your fish, cut into 1-2" pieces, pack them into Pint jars, leaving a bit of space at the top. Add the following to each jar: 1/2 tsp salt, 1 tblsp vinegar, 1 tblsp creamy french dressing. Clean rims of jars and apply hot lids, screw down the ring firmly. Process in Pressure Canner for 100 minutes (yes, an hour and 40 minutes!) at 12 lbs of pressure.
DO NOT ADD ANY WATER IN WITH THE FISH!

Appalachian Mtn Polish Sausage:
64oz ketsup
2 cups sugar
2 cups vinegar (white)
2 cups vegetable oil
4 packages Hot Dogs, cut into 1/2" pieces
2 gallons hot or bell peppers, sliced into strips
Stir all together, bring to a slow boil and boil until heated through. Ladle into jars, leaving 3/4" headspace. Wipe off jar rims, put on hot lids and screw down ring firmly. Now, all my kin folk process this in a Hot Water Bath and don't seem any worse for the wear However....I'm advising you to Pressure Can this! The rule is pressure can any/all meat! So pressure can the quarts at 10 lb of pressure for 30 minutes and pints for 20 minutes. (I fix this over a bed of rice or noodles.)

Enjoy!!
Shenandoah
 

Kenny Lee

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I never canned before but I am looking into it. Any difference or suggestion between electric and regular pressure canner? Sometimes I hear about them going off and exploding, but I assume that only happens if the pressure release valve is fouled and dirty right?
 

Shenandoah

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I never canned before but I am looking into it. Any difference or suggestion between electric and regular pressure canner? Sometimes I hear about them going off and exploding, but I assume that only happens if the pressure release valve is fouled and dirty right?
Honestly, the only way a pressure canner "blows" is when the person doing the canning goes off to do something else and loses track of the pressure! I'm a self taught canner and I've never had a minute's trouble using a pressure canner. I actually bought both of my pressure canners off ebay and they are both stellar!! And I must plead ignorant as to an electric canner....I've neither heard of nor used one!!

Blessings,
Shenandoah
 

doc pops

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Thanks for the meat recipes, I will try with deer and the sausage.
Thanks again
Good luck, be safe, and God bless
 

Shenandoah

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What is the shelf life of canned meat with no refrigeration?
Years!!
We just opened 4 quarts of elk that was canned in 2005. The top few pieces were a bit dry but the rest was awesome! Tasted just like fresh canned. The key is taking your time and doing it right...no short-cuts when canning.

Blessings,
Shenandoah
 

doc pops

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From what I have read , the U.S.D.A and jar mfg say a year! LOL. My wife was talking with her mom in Spokane, WA and she said they have had mincemeat, deer, and elk for years! My wife said she is sending some mincemeat that is eight(8) yrs old and she said they had some about a week ago and it was fine. My mother-in-law said she thinks she has some elk her late husband killed in 03 if my brother-in-laws did not get it before they headed for Priest Lake Idaho for the hunting season. Can't wait till I get home, my sweet mother-in-law makes some mean mincemeat.

As always, good luck, be safe and God bless
 

Danil54grl

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It occurred to me that if I didn't get you these recipes now....may not ever get back to it!!
Deer/Elk:
I cut the meat into large 2-3" pieces. You can either raw pack the meat or hot pack the meat. The difference is time and a tad more effort!! Raw pack is just that, cut up the meat and pack it into your jars. Hot pack entails browning the meat in a skillet with a bit of oil before packing them into the jars. Hot pack is prettier in the jars...thats really the only difference I see!! For the most part, we raw pack everything. Another tip: Use wide-mouth jars for meat, when possible. You can get a bit more in each jar and its just easier to get the meat in and out of the jar if you are using wide-mouths.
In each quart jar I put a good size slice of onion and a slice of a pepper, any pepper: bell or banana. I then add 1 cube of beef boulion, a tsp of salt. Fill each with boiling water, leaving 3/4" headspace. Wipe the rim of the jar clean and apply lid. (Keep your lids simmering or sitting in hot water so they go onto the jars hot) Screw down the ring firmly. Process the quarts for 90 minutes at 10 lbs of pressure in a pressure canner. *If you are processing pints, half the above receipe and process for 75 minutes.

Fish:
(Trout, Salmon, Whatever)
Clean and skin your fish, cut into 1-2" pieces, pack them into Pint jars, leaving a bit of space at the top. Add the following to each jar: 1/2 tsp salt, 1 tblsp vinegar, 1 tblsp creamy french dressing. Clean rims of jars and apply hot lids, screw down the ring firmly. Process in Pressure Canner for 100 minutes (yes, an hour and 40 minutes!) at 12 lbs of pressure.
DO NOT ADD ANY WATER IN WITH THE FISH!

Appalachian Mtn Polish Sausage:
64oz ketsup
2 cups sugar
2 cups vinegar (white)
2 cups vegetable oil
4 packages Hot Dogs, cut into 1/2" pieces
2 gallons hot or bell peppers, sliced into strips
Stir all together, bring to a slow boil and boil until heated through. Ladle into jars, leaving 3/4" headspace. Wipe off jar rims, put on hot lids and screw down ring firmly. Now, all my kin folk process this in a Hot Water Bath and don't seem any worse for the wear However....I'm advising you to Pressure Can this! The rule is pressure can any/all meat! So pressure can the quarts at 10 lb of pressure for 30 minutes and pints for 20 minutes. (I fix this over a bed of rice or noodles.)

Enjoy!!
Shenandoah
Thanks for sharing! I love to try out new recipes. . .
 

Clyde

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Years!!
We just opened 4 quarts of elk that was canned in 2005. The top few pieces were a bit dry but the rest was awesome! Tasted just like fresh canned. The key is taking your time and doing it right...no short-cuts when canning.

Blessings,
Shenandoah
I just don't know how to do it right, or wrong for that matter. Canning isn't the most popular thing in southern california. At least not since I was a kid in the 70's
 

Danil54grl

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Canning in general is not popular for the most part Clyde. I only know of a few others and they are mainly from this site or over 70. Honestly books will tell you to use your home canned foods within a year, but (and I can tell you from experience and so can Anorak and Shenandoah) it mainly depends on what you can. I like to use jellies and jams within 1 1/2 to 2 years because the flavor does change, but for veggie and meat based product, they tend to stay "fresh" for years to come. I have many jars that are from 2009 that I have opened recently that are just as good as the day I canned them. If you are new to canning, get a Blue Ball Book or any other canning guide you can find as along as it is a newer version. Some of the old can give some bad processing advise, like "open kettle". Once you feel comfortable with the process, venture out. . . there is an endless world on what you can "can" up for future use.
 

Shenandoah

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Canning in general is not popular for the most part Clyde. I only know of a few others and they are mainly from this site or over 70. Honestly books will tell you to use your home canned foods within a year, but (and I can tell you from experience and so can Anorak and Shenandoah) it mainly depends on what you can. I like to use jellies and jams within 1 1/2 to 2 years because the flavor does change, but for veggie and meat based product, they tend to stay "fresh" for years to come. I have many jars that are from 2009 that I have opened recently that are just as good as the day I canned them. If you are new to canning, get a Blue Ball Book or any other canning guide you can find as along as it is a newer version. Some of the old can give some bad processing advise, like "open kettle". Once you feel comfortable with the process, venture out. . . there is an endless world on what you can "can" up for future use.
Dude...
I can't speak for Texas but as for Colorado, the folks signing up for my canning classes are in their 20's and 30's!! It is extremely popular here. I limit classes to 12 students and always have a waiting list! My brother and his family teach sustainable living in South Carolina and he has the same experiences there...canning is extremely popular. Every time there is another tainted food recall or a GMO controversy, the interest multiplies! Seriously, the oldest person in any class we have taught is me and I'm 49!!

Blessings,
Shenandoah
 

Danil54grl

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Dude...
I can't speak for Texas but as for Colorado, the folks signing up for my canning classes are in their 20's and 30's!! It is extremely popular here. I limit classes to 12 students and always have a waiting list! My brother and his family teach sustainable living in South Carolina and he has the same experiences there...canning is extremely popular. Every time there is another tainted food recall or a GMO controversy, the interest multiplies! Seriously, the oldest person in any class we have taught is me and I'm 49!!

Blessings,
Shenandoah
That is awesome that you find so many interested. It may change in my neck of the woods, but like I said. . . in my experience they don't. But also around here, people don't generally garden either. When people find out that I can, they look at me like I am strange and the ones that seem impressed, I will offer to teach them. So far have only had 1 that took me up. I didn't have anyone in my family, any friends or friends parents that I knew growing up that canned, except 1. That was when I was about 9 years old and I watched her can up peaches. I started teaching myself when I was 18, but mainly out of necessity because I was on my own and found that was the most economical way to preserve food long term. But no. . . not a popular thing around here.
 

Shenandoah

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That is awesome that you find so many interested. It may change in my neck of the woods, but like I said. . . in my experience they don't. But also around here, people don't generally garden either. When people find out that I can, they look at me like I am strange and the ones that seem impressed, I will offer to teach them. So far have only had 1 that took me up. I didn't have anyone in my family, any friends or friends parents that I knew growing up that canned, except 1. That was when I was about 9 years old and I watched her can up peaches. I started teaching myself when I was 18, but mainly out of necessity because I was on my own and found that was the most economical way to preserve food long term. But no. . . not a popular thing around here.
Danil54grl-
I too am a self-taught canner. My folks didn't start canning their harvest until after they had both retired and by then I was living half-way across the country! I learned from the Ball Blue Book and just kept trying recipes. Like you, I realized quickly, the financial advantage to preserving what we grew. I figure every person we can teach to hunt, fish, can, smoke, or salt, their own food, the less number of them that will be beating on our door when the shtf.

Blessings,
Shenandoah
 

Danil54grl

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Think that it is a great idea that you have classes to teach canning. Around here the closest sustainable living class is about 50 miles north and that is basic gardening.
 

jimLE

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im glad i came across this thread..
im fixing up beans n ham right now.in which they'll go into 1 quart jars,this time round..but i plan on using the 4 1/2 pint jars of chicken broth i have to fix up what chicken we have in the freezer.not only to free up freezer space.but to avoid freezer burn as well.now my questions are,can this be done with chicken?is 90 minutes the idea time for canning it? and do i have to add chicken broth to it,or just leave it as is once in the jar?
 

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