Quantcast

Helpful Info. On the subject of planting fruit & nut trees as a "prep".....

Doomsday Prepper Forums - The Number One Prepper Site

Help Support Doomsday Prepper Forums:

Buttoni

God Like
Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2020
Messages
258
Reaction score
1,112
Location
Central Texas
Man, little did I know the loquat trees I had at my last 3 yards were a virtual medicine cabinet.......not just very attractive fruit trees. Here I just thought them attractive specimen plants that yielded tiny fruits prolifically that made wonderful preserves. My recipe, if anyone is interested BTW: Loquat-Orange Preserves. This tree is like a medicine cabinet which this article expands on quite nicely: Loquat, native to many regions in Asia, exhibits anti-diabetes properties. And they shed fruit on the ground that germinate amazingly easily (almost to an annoyance if not pulled or mowed down). I'm going to dig up my biggest seedling and take it to my BOL this week and get that sucker planted ASAP! These trees also grow very fast, I might add. I planted one I bought at a nursery years ago down on the Gulf Coast that was just 2-3' tall at planting. It was 10' and producing hundreds of fruit in just about 7 years and around 15' tall by the time we sold the place at 14 years. That's pretty fast, around a foot of growth a year! Every year there are many more fruit than the year before. And a lot faster than nut trees to reach significant nut production. My current tree's seedlings get 1½' tall or better in just one season if I don't eliminate them from underneath the tree. For those not familiar, the fruit look like this and taste like a cross between an apricot and a plum to me. imagees of loquat trees at DuckDuckGo
 
Last edited:

Buttoni

God Like
Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2020
Messages
258
Reaction score
1,112
Location
Central Texas
Well then, I've just dug up two seedlings. A larger one 12" tall (longer tap root snapped by lifting, as it was too deep and entangled in the mother trees' roots, but hairy roots still in tact). Also dug up a smaller one with tap root in tact and a few hairy roots starting to develop. We'll see if one of then will go for me. One is none; two is one. :)
 

David SB

God Like
Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
299
Reaction score
1,374
Location
Texas
The ones I looked up had 8-10 and I always get a little leery if the claim is at the edge of it's rating. Just wondered about actual experience and not a sales pitch rating
 

DirtDiva

Demi-God
Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2020
Messages
1,084
Reaction score
4,443
Location
Cumberland Plateau, Tennessee
The ones I looked up had 8-10 and I always get a little leery if the claim is at the edge of it's rating. Just wondered about actual experience and not a sales pitch rating
While I don't live that far south anymore I lived outside New Orleans for many years in zone 8b. I did successfully grow Satsumas for many years as did my parents but with some mild winter protection. Both my parents and I planted the trees in a south facing position up against a building wall. Then when winter temps threatened made a hut with plastic to protect from frost that was fastened to the overhang of the building. When warm the poly could be rolled up. We picked huge amounts of satsumas but you have to keep the tree well pruned to fit the space.

If you are willing to commit the extra time to protecting you could make it work. For me personally I try to limit the things I have to "baby" to produce. I now live in zone 7A. My one exception is figs. I have figs planted against the south wall of a masonry shed. The wall is painted white. I wrap the fig tree every fall with a tower of fence wire and fill it with straw and dry leaves. Then I wrap the tower of insulation with plastic and cap with a tarp to keep out moisture. Some years that is enough and some really harsh years not. I really love figs though. That is the ONLY crop that I will go to those extremes for.
 

DirtDiva

Demi-God
Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2020
Messages
1,084
Reaction score
4,443
Location
Cumberland Plateau, Tennessee
And on the question of fruit and nut trees as a prep I think they are excellent preps. They can be integrated into your landscape with no one the wiser in many situations and are reasonably inexpensive. Just plant 1 or 2 a year. I am a huge fan of native species for the ease of care.
 

Buttoni

God Like
Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2020
Messages
258
Reaction score
1,112
Location
Central Texas
What zone are you in? I would love to plant citrus up at my place but it is in the upper reaches zone 8b close to zone 8a. Wondering if the chill hours are getting too high up there
I'm in 8a, about an hour north of Austin. Mine thrives here (planted by previous owners) and is about 15' high and 12' wide with a huge trunk now. The seedling I'm setting out at our BOL is in Milam county, so 8b on that one. The one I had on the Coast was in Texas City. My mother planted one as far up as Texarkana years ago and it produced fruit (they have pretty hard winters up there), so I think probably anywhere but the panhandle would work for these lovely trees, with warmer climate being their preference, of course. Just to be sure you're familiar, these are not kumquats, a citrus plant. These are LOquats, more in the apricot/peach/plum family in flavor/texture/skin.

I have absolutely no luck with kumquats (citrus fruit). The one I planted in Texas City died on me, and that was NOT from a freeze, but rather either soil issues or perhaps salt air or refinery air emissions? Don't know really. It never really got going in my soil there and died in the first year of planting.
 

David SB

God Like
Member
Joined
Feb 7, 2019
Messages
299
Reaction score
1,374
Location
Texas
You are correct... I read Loquats and thought Kumquats...old age strikes again, Just like the "Big Guy" sleepy Joe... thanks for the info

PS,,, my wife Graduated from LaMarque back in ancient times we got married in the catholic church in Texas City
 
Last edited:

jayjay

God Like
Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2012
Messages
688
Reaction score
1,119
Location
Australia
And on the question of fruit and nut trees as a prep I think they are excellent preps. They can be integrated into your landscape with no one the wiser in many situations and are reasonably inexpensive. Just plant 1 or 2 a year. I am a huge fan of native species for the ease of care.
I've been planting out fruit trees at my bol - nectarine, peach, apple.

I'm also studying, and planting out native trees/bushes for food and medicinal purposes too.
I'm also attempting to grow natives by seed - some seem to be working better than others, but it's only just starting to warm up here.
 

GaRp58

A True Doomsday Prepper
Member
Joined
Sep 6, 2019
Messages
1,583
Reaction score
5,626
Location
at my BOL
I have planted the very first 6 pecan trees in Hungary. I have never seen pecan trees anywhere in Europe in 42 years. I hope to have some pecans within the next 3 years as they are already 8 years old.
Remember to try plant some moringia trees if you have the right place. Also an amazing tree with seedlings like bamboo sprouts or real seeds for eating and cooking. Healthy food.
If you are having any diabetes problems, get 10 to 12 leaves from mistletoe, (no seeds!!). Soak the leaves is well water or filtered water with no chlorine or flourine for 3 days. A small glass daily will slowly start to help your body remember to produce its own insulin again. Gary
 

DirtDiva

Demi-God
Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2020
Messages
1,084
Reaction score
4,443
Location
Cumberland Plateau, Tennessee
If you are having any diabetes problems, get 10 to 12 leaves from mistletoe, (no seeds!!). Soak the leaves is well water or filtered water with no chlorine or flourine for 3 days. A small glass daily will slowly start to help your body remember to produce its own insulin again. Gary
Gary is right and mistletoe teas are available over the counter as tea and even injection. If you are going to pick your own be very careful with mistletoe while Gary is right and mistletoe is used medicinally it’s believed over 100 different mistletoe species grow around the world. A few of these are commonly harvested for their medicinal purposes.

However, American mistletoe (Phoradendron flavescen) is the type that grows in the United States and is used as a romantic holiday decoration, while European mistletoe (Viscum album) is the species that has been used for centuries in traditional herbal medicine. A third species of mistletoe (Loranthus ferrugineus) is less common but used by some to treat high blood pressure and gastrointestinal complaints. Other species, including Japanese mistletoe (Taxillus yadoriki Danser), are known for their many antimicrobial and antioxidant properties.

Gary your European mistletoe is much milder than our American and less poisonous. Most OTC mistletoe teas and injections are made from European mistletoe. For those picking American mistletoe for tea or tincture I suggest caution.

It’s well-known that parts of the plant, including the berries and leaves, can cause serious side effects when consumed orally.

The poisonous ingredient found in mistletoe is called phoratoxin.

Potential adverse reactions include vomiting, diarrhea, cramping and liver damage if used long-term.

All of that being said, European mistletoe when used as medicine seems to be generally safe in small amounts.

I do strongly suggest caution, do your own research and possibly contact an herbal specialist or health professional because this can interfere with normal diabetic medications. JMHO
 
Last edited:

Buttoni

God Like
Member
Joined
Sep 10, 2020
Messages
258
Reaction score
1,112
Location
Central Texas
I tried my hand at moringa trees here in the city a couple years ago. I got several going in pots, but they all died in our oppressive summer Texas heat once I planted them outdoors in the ground. I think I set them in-ground too soon. I know moringa do well in hot climate, so I was so surprised they all died. I have a few seeds left and plan on trying them again down at our cabin bug out place next week. Will let them get a lot bigger in their original pots this time.Moringa 3 wks.jpg
 

Latest posts

Top