Canning Butter

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Danil54grl

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Last year Anorak and Chickadee did some talking about canning butter and I was intrigued so did some research (I think this recipe came from one of the LDS sites). Since then, I have been making my own butter out of my Jersey milk and canning it, but thought I would share. This can be done with homemade butter or with butter from the store when it goes on sell.

Heat pint jars in a 250 degree oven for 20 minutes, without rings or seals. One pound of butter slightly more than fills one pint jar, so if you melt 11 pounds of butter, heat 12 pint jars. A roasting pan works well for holding the pint jars while in the oven.

While the jars are heating, melt butter slowly until it comes to a slow boil. Using a large spatula, stir the bottom of the pot often to keep the butter from scorching. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes at least: a good simmer time will lessen the amount of shaking required (see #5 below). Place the lids in a small pot and bring to a boil, leaving the lids in simmering water until needed.

Stirring the melted butter from the bottom to the top with a soup ladle or small pot with a handle, pour the melted butter carefully into heated jars through a canning jar funnel. Leave 3/4" of head space in the jar, which allows room for the shaking process.

Carefully wipe off the top of the jars, then get a hot lid from the simmering water, add the lid and ring and tighten securely. Lids will seal as they cool. Once a few lids "ping," shake while the jars are still warm, but cool enough to handle easily, because the butter will separate and become foamy on top and white on the bottom. In a few minutes, shake again, and repeat until the butter retains the same consistency throughout the jar.

At this point, while still slightly warm, put the jars into a refrigerator. While cooling and hardening, shake again, and the melted butter will then look like butter and become firm. This final shaking is very important! Check every 5 minutes and give the jars a little shake until they are hardened in the jar! Leave in the refrigerator for an hour.

Canned butter should store for 3 years or longer on a cool, dark shelf. (I have used butter canned 5 years ago and it was tasty!) Canned butter does not "melt" again when opened, so it does not need to be refrigerated upon opening, provided it is used within a reasonable length of time.
 

Brent S

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Last year Anorak and Chickadee did some talking about canning butter and I was intrigued so did some research (I think this recipe came from one of the LDS sites). Since then, I have been making my own butter out of my Jersey milk and canning it, but thought I would share. This can be done with homemade butter or with butter from the store when it goes on sell.

Heat pint jars in a 250 degree oven for 20 minutes, without rings or seals. One pound of butter slightly more than fills one pint jar, so if you melt 11 pounds of butter, heat 12 pint jars. A roasting pan works well for holding the pint jars while in the oven.

While the jars are heating, melt butter slowly until it comes to a slow boil. Using a large spatula, stir the bottom of the pot often to keep the butter from scorching. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes at least: a good simmer time will lessen the amount of shaking required (see #5 below). Place the lids in a small pot and bring to a boil, leaving the lids in simmering water until needed.

Stirring the melted butter from the bottom to the top with a soup ladle or small pot with a handle, pour the melted butter carefully into heated jars through a canning jar funnel. Leave 3/4" of head space in the jar, which allows room for the shaking process.

Carefully wipe off the top of the jars, then get a hot lid from the simmering water, add the lid and ring and tighten securely. Lids will seal as they cool. Once a few lids "ping," shake while the jars are still warm, but cool enough to handle easily, because the butter will separate and become foamy on top and white on the bottom. In a few minutes, shake again, and repeat until the butter retains the same consistency throughout the jar.

At this point, while still slightly warm, put the jars into a refrigerator. While cooling and hardening, shake again, and the melted butter will then look like butter and become firm. This final shaking is very important! Check every 5 minutes and give the jars a little shake until they are hardened in the jar! Leave in the refrigerator for an hour.

Canned butter should store for 3 years or longer on a cool, dark shelf. (I have used butter canned 5 years ago and it was tasty!) Canned butter does not "melt" again when opened, so it does not need to be refrigerated upon opening, provided it is used within a reasonable length of time.
is there any homesteading youre not good at!lol
 

Danil54grl

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is there any homesteading youre not good at!lol
I am still learning just like everyone else. . . but willing to share some things that I know. There is still a lot I need to learn dealing with milk. I have made 'fresh' cheese like Ricotta Paneer and Blanco, but haven't ventured into the aged ones yet, but that will be on my todo list one day. Those you need some kind of rennet, which I have been seeing that you can make your own with thistle when it is in bloom, so waiting for that to try. Also, I need a 'culture' so looking into a way of getting a natural culture. We are all on this site to learn from one another, right. . .not just read about. I believe in trying to make as much at home as you can and bypass the grocery stores that have outrageous prices for an item because they are doing the work and not me. I have been fortunate enough to have a dairy cow to learn all these things, not everyone has that opportunity.
 

Gazrok

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So far, powdered butter is about the only long-term solution I can think of. Interesting idea though. Especially since powdered anything is pretty expensive.
 

GeorgiaPeachie

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Last year Anorak and Chickadee did some talking about canning butter and I was intrigued so did some research (I think this recipe came from one of the LDS sites). Since then, I have been making my own butter out of my Jersey milk and canning it, but thought I would share. This can be done with homemade butter or with butter from the store when it goes on sell.

Heat pint jars in a 250 degree oven for 20 minutes, without rings or seals. One pound of butter slightly more than fills one pint jar, so if you melt 11 pounds of butter, heat 12 pint jars. A roasting pan works well for holding the pint jars while in the oven.

While the jars are heating, melt butter slowly until it comes to a slow boil. Using a large spatula, stir the bottom of the pot often to keep the butter from scorching. Reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes at least: a good simmer time will lessen the amount of shaking required (see #5 below). Place the lids in a small pot and bring to a boil, leaving the lids in simmering water until needed.

Stirring the melted butter from the bottom to the top with a soup ladle or small pot with a handle, pour the melted butter carefully into heated jars through a canning jar funnel. Leave 3/4" of head space in the jar, which allows room for the shaking process.

Carefully wipe off the top of the jars, then get a hot lid from the simmering water, add the lid and ring and tighten securely. Lids will seal as they cool. Once a few lids "ping," shake while the jars are still warm, but cool enough to handle easily, because the butter will separate and become foamy on top and white on the bottom. In a few minutes, shake again, and repeat until the butter retains the same consistency throughout the jar.

At this point, while still slightly warm, put the jars into a refrigerator. While cooling and hardening, shake again, and the melted butter will then look like butter and become firm. This final shaking is very important! Check every 5 minutes and give the jars a little shake until they are hardened in the jar! Leave in the refrigerator for an hour.

Canned butter should store for 3 years or longer on a cool, dark shelf. (I have used butter canned 5 years ago and it was tasty!) Canned butter does not "melt" again when opened, so it does not need to be refrigerated upon opening, provided it is used within a reasonable length of time.
This is the same directions I’ve used Except I always pressure can it after this. There is a chance of botulism if you don’t. Have done a bunch of them. Lucky you though, you make the butter with fresh milk! Haven’t made butter since I left home. No cows or goats. There is a a taste difference with some of the cheaper butter. Not bad, but you can tell the difference. Some people use salted butter, some folks unsalted.

ADDED... the shaking process happens after pressure canning, if you do that part
 

Danil54grl

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This is the same directions I’ve used Except I always pressure can it after this. There is a chance of botulism if you don’t. Have done a bunch of them. Lucky you though, you make the butter with fresh milk! Haven’t made butter since I left home. No cows or goats. There is a a taste difference with some of the cheaper butter. Not bad, but you can tell the difference. Some people use salted butter, some folks unsalted.

ADDED... the shaking process happens after pressure canning, if you do that part
How long do you pressure can?
 

Danil54grl

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I’ve also canned sour cream and 🥓 Bacon. Have done a bunch of it too.
I've done the bacon but not sour cream. Please share. Maybe put it in a thread on its own so not to lose. Things tend to get buried and misplaced on threads and hard to find when you get a chance to save it.
 

GeorgiaPeachie

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I've done the bacon but not sour cream. Please share. Maybe put it in a thread on its own so not to lose.
Will get those out and share on separate threads tomorrow. The reason I got into doing this is because I can’t stand the thought of not having butter, bacon and sour cream if the grid goes down.

Its also why I have stocks of choc chips, lots of cocoa, confectioners sugar, regular sugar and brown sugar. Also lots of popcorn. Everything is in sealed buckets with Mylar bags and oxygen absorbers.
 

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