San Andreas Fault

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Maverick

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Last year (2019) early July I posted about my Wife being in California with the USGS regarding the large earthquake at Ridgecrest, map I posted is here: This weeks preps check-in.

The conclusions from the studies, the Ridgecrest quakes in Southern California has put significant stress on the Garlock Fault that can trigger a major San Andreas Fault quake, they are concerned the stress is going to let loose. No proof a quake is happening anytime soon never the less check your preps and double check especially if one live in L.A. County to San Fransisco

The Garlock Fault July 2019. Truck in the background is a USGS laser scanner USGS/Ben Brooks
ridgecrest.jpg
 

TexasFreedom

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Maverick

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Hydroplate Theory is significantly flawed

If this is the case, we’re talking about continental speeds of up to three meters per hour during the flood year! That something as huge as a continental plate could move that fast defies credulity.

Several basic errors of physics, apparently Brown is not well versed in algebra, calculus, and geophysics?

Water Velocity

Brown has a 10 km thick granite crust with a 1 km thick layer of water. The pressure is enough to raise a tube of water to 17 km. Water squirting up out of the hole will rise to that level. What is the velocity of the water coming out of the crack? Ignoring friction, this can be found by equating the potential energy of the drops at 17 km to the kinetic energy at the surface needed to propel the water that high. Thus:

gh = .5v^2

where:

h is the height of the water, 17 km

v is the velocity

g is the acceleration due to gravity, 9.8

Solving for v, we have v = 577 meters /sec. According to the steam table, there is a 814 times increase of volume in the phase change. The vapor occupies 814 times more volume.

Now, According to Steam Tables, the pressure needed to keep water a liquid at 250º F, which is the temperature of Brown’s water, is 2.02 atmospheres.

Consider a 1 square meter tube with 577 cubic m/s emanating from it. Due to the fact that 2.02 atmosphere is the weight of 20 meters of water, water coming up the crack will not change to steam until the final 20 meters. With the velocity of 577 meters per second coming out of the crack, this means that 577 cubic meters each second will occupy 814 times the volume that it used to. As a water surface passes the point at which it turns into vapor, it will, within one second, be pushed 577 x 814 = 469,779 m. This is a velocity of 469 kilometers per second. There would be no flood since none of the vapor would remain on the earth. The earth’s escape velocity is about 11 kilometers per second. Any object that exceeds 11 km per second leaves the earth and never returns. How could this theory cause a flood?

In reality these numbers would be somewhat smaller due to frictional effects, but even if they are off by 99%, the steam escaping is still above escape velocity for the earth. The steam would be sent to Alpha Centauri!!
 

DrHenley

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Not going to get into the argument one way or another about the Hydroplate Theory, but...

There is a fatal flaw in your argument Mav. Once the steam reaches the atmosphere, it will experience extreme air resistance which will rapidly slow it down waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay before it reaches outer space. It will become concentrated water vapor in the atmosphere and when it hits cooler air high in the atmosphere it will condense and fall back to earth as rain.

Seems there was some mention of RAIN in the flood story...🤔...just saying...
 

TexasFreedom

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Mav,

Given that Brown is (was?) a college professor in Physics and mathematics, I doubt he lacked knowledge in that topic to make such a fundamental flaw.

A simple illustration. Take a water nozzle and you can shoot water 30 feet. Unscrew the nozzle and the water only goes 3 feet. Same pressure, different size openings. In Hydroplate theory, the initial crack is small yielding greater velocity. As it opened, velocity dropped.
 

Maverick

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So, the whole plate sat on water, the core heated this water up to the point that it ruptured 60km thick of the earth core
Mav,

Given that Brown is (was?) a college professor in Physics and mathematics, I doubt he lacked knowledge in that topic to make such a fundamental flaw.

A simple illustration. Take a water nozzle and you can shoot water 30 feet. Unscrew the nozzle and the water only goes 3 feet. Same pressure, different size openings. In Hydroplate theory, the initial crack is small yielding greater velocity. As it opened, velocity dropped.
 

Maverick

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Not going to get into the argument one way or another about the Hydroplate Theory, but...

There is a fatal flaw in your argument Mav. Once the steam reaches the atmosphere, it will experience extreme air resistance which will rapidly slow it down waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay before it reaches outer space. It will become concentrated water vapor in the atmosphere and when it hits cooler air high in the atmosphere it will condense and fall back to earth as rain.

Seems there was some mention of RAIN in the flood story...🤔...just saying...
Velocity will play a role, the pressure needed to keep water a liquid at 250º F, which is the temperature of Brown’s water is 2.02 atmospheres pressure traveling 469 kilometers per second 17km high (250f at 17km high is Browns theory). The earth’s escape velocity is about 11 kilometers per second we are also talking super heater water heated from the earth core creating enough pressure to split the plates, this much heat would boil the oceans.

The earth was flooded but not this way, I don’t think Noah could survive this. This is a poor mechanism for a flood, some of his calculations doesn't pass enthalpy of evaporation.
 

TexasFreedom

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Mav,

The link you give reads like a CNN article talking about Trump. Just a few examples:
* It calls him "a retired mechanical engineer", Dr Brown got his PhD in mechanical engineering from MIT and taught college engineering/physics. No bias there?
* It makes a big deal about if the crust was 10 miles, or 20 miles, or 60 miles thick. Does it really matter, everyone agrees that it varies.
* It talks about how the water was 'sealed', and expressed surprise how things like meteors had not cracked that 'seal'. Really? 10 miles thick crust, and the article thinks a meteor will break through that?
* The heat discussion is an incredibly complicated model. Look at how much heat goes into a gun's suppressor? The heat didn't all stay in the water.

And the article does plenty of nit-picking. I don't think anyone will say the theory is flawless, any theory that is so wide-reaching will have details that are wrong. But that doesn't mean the entire theory is wrong. I believe the theory explains far more than the flaws present. Who said the Ark was anywhere near the crack, it could have started 5,000 miles away. But you might want to get your information from someone other than a CNN-look-alike.
 

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