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Silent Earth

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If you are not using your own FILTER system already you should be getting one.
http://news.sky.com/story/1704022/dirty-water-supplies-poisoning-public-trust
Dirty Water Supplies 'Poisoning Public Trust'
The team which exposed lead contaminated water supplies in Flint, Michigan, fear similar scenarios are unfolding across America.
09:45, UK,
Monday 30 May 2016
Water quality in St Joseph in northeastern Louisiana
By Cordelia Lynch, US Correspondent
As you drive into St Joseph in northeastern Louisiana, close to the Mississippi river, the rusty water tower overshadowing the town, is a sign of things to come.
A nearby road is flooded. We're told someone has hit a fire hydrant with a lawnmower.
It seems innocuous, but it is part of a much bigger problem here - ageing pipes, a creaking infrastructure and brown coloured water so thick with iron sediment, most people are too scared to drink it, cook with it, or bathe in it.
Residents tell me it's been like this for a decade.
More than a third of the people are living below the poverty line, but they depend on bottled water.

Water quality in St Joseph in northeastern Louisiana

St Joseph resident Betty adds bleach to her bath water
I meet 59-year-old Betty, a warm, welcoming woman with a broad smile.
She picks up a bottle of bleach and says: "I add two drops to my bath." She's hopes it will kill bacteria.
A brain-eating amoeba has been discovered in Louisiana's water supplies. People in the state are nervous.
Around the corner, I meet Carmen Bates sitting on a porch in the searing heat.
She tells me: "There are children getting sick, they have rashes."
Excessive limits of iron and manganese have been found in St Joseph's water.
The Environmental Protection Agency insist it's still safe to drink, the problem just aesthetic.
But few will risk it - even the town's mayor, Edward Brown, says he won't touch it.

The lead-tainted water crisis in Flint, Michigan, has eroded public trust across America and the water systems need urgent repairs.
It is a microcosm of a much wider catastrophe - poor communities exposed to dirty water, with little change in sight.

At Virginia Tech University I meet the pioneering professor Marc Edwards who helped uncover the poisoned water in Flint.
"There are definitely other Flints unfolding... because we're human, we screw things up," he says.

His latest focus is private wells.
Around 16% of Americans rely on them he says, and they've discovered the same levels of lead they saw in Flint.
His lab is packed with samples from New Orleans, New York State and Virginia, all sent in by worried homeowners following the Flint scandal. But this is a team of just 25 people.
They're passionate and persistent, but the scale of the problem is overwhelming.
 

Silent Bob

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Their is no doubt that most of the country is way behind my town. We lead the nation in water reuse projects. We have a desalination plant that take water from one of our prehistoric ocean lakes and filters/dilutes it back into our fresh water lakes. We have two new water treatment plants that filter the water for a MSA that buys water from our city. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, basically lives our plant testing the water and annually our city publishes the analysis of these studies both government and private. What is more interesting is the fact that when we had the temporary water reuse system (taking gray water and mixing into our drinking fresh water), the water actually tasted better (no hint of sulfur on certain days). I know that their were many that rejected drinking from the tap, but really it was quite tasting. We buy bottled water from a company, but too be honest, even using an acceptable water filter to the tap, made the water taste better than the stuff we bought (right spring water). I am unaware of any municipality that blended 50 percent of the affluent into their freshwater, but it did work and had high marks. This would not have happened had our community not had the foresight to invest in our water systems. As for the cost of this water, we pay for very high water and sewage rates compared to other similar size cities in Texas. The investment will be well worth it, if we experience another drought. It certainly beats watching people place little signs in their front as the grass burned calling for "God to Bring Rain", and as other people moved to other communities that did not experience this drought.

In a year and half we will have the permanent water reuse plant a reality and out city just spent money on a survey to get the Texas to approve building a new lake that will provide not only water for our community, but if Dallas pays for part of it, they may have use of it too.

As many know, water will be the next gold. In Texas, we are very drought prone and our community launched a very restrictive water conservation program. Our lakes are now at 100 percent, in fact, I was just out there yesterday and it was coming over the spillway. Our salty lake stands at 100 percent and our two fresh water lakes are at 100 percent. The main reservoir lake is 2 feet above. Many of our tributaries are swollen and at flood stage, but we are not complaining as we were sitting at less than 20 percent last year in our main lakes.

We drink with confidence here in my town.
 

Arcticdude

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Good quality fresh water isn't an issue where we live. Our well produces 27 gpm of great tasting ice cold water and is over 650' deep. We also have several springs and a spring fed pond on the property and numerous mountain streams in the area. I'll be planting fish in the pond soon so it will double as a food source as well as a backup for drinking and irrigation water.
 

Brent S

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Their is no doubt that most of the country is way behind my town. We lead the nation in water reuse projects. We have a desalination plant that take water from one of our prehistoric ocean lakes and filters/dilutes it back into our fresh water lakes. We have two new water treatment plants that filter the water for a MSA that buys water from our city. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, basically lives our plant testing the water and annually our city publishes the analysis of these studies both government and private. What is more interesting is the fact that when we had the temporary water reuse system (taking gray water and mixing into our drinking fresh water), the water actually tasted better (no hint of sulfur on certain days). I know that their were many that rejected drinking from the tap, but really it was quite tasting. We buy bottled water from a company, but too be honest, even using an acceptable water filter to the tap, made the water taste better than the stuff we bought (right spring water). I am unaware of any municipality that blended 50 percent of the affluent into their freshwater, but it did work and had high marks. This would not have happened had our community not had the foresight to invest in our water systems. As for the cost of this water, we pay for very high water and sewage rates compared to other similar size cities in Texas. The investment will be well worth it, if we experience another drought. It certainly beats watching people place little signs in their front as the grass burned calling for "God to Bring Rain", and as other people moved to other communities that did not experience this drought.

In a year and half we will have the permanent water reuse plant a reality and out city just spent money on a survey to get the Texas to approve building a new lake that will provide not only water for our community, but if Dallas pays for part of it, they may have use of it too.

As many know, water will be the next gold. In Texas, we are very drought prone and our community launched a very restrictive water conservation program. Our lakes are now at 100 percent, in fact, I was just out there yesterday and it was coming over the spillway. Our salty lake stands at 100 percent and our two fresh water lakes are at 100 percent. The main reservoir lake is 2 feet above. Many of our tributaries are swollen and at flood stage, but we are not complaining as we were sitting at less than 20 percent last year in our main lakes.

We drink with confidence here in my town.
Sorry to hear about all the rain at once in Texas. Seems like you guys can't catch a break between drought or flooding. Hope your place is good.
 

Silent Bob

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I love the rain, granted I think I am paying a ton in chemicals for my pool (last week about $110, but it was the first time I treated it in about four months). Good thing is I am not tapping into the city water to fill it. Floods not an issue for us here, but down South...they've had some bad ones.

A friend of ours went down to Bandera for a Country Music festival, the promoters learned from last years rain that they needed to do something, so this year they got one of those big circus tents for the concert. However, mid concert, law enforcement came because they were concerned about the saturation of the tent and didn't want it collapsing on the people, so they friends went into the bar, it had two inches or water in it, then the LE came in and said they had to close the bar due to flooding. So our friends sat in their car until the water receded on the roadway as the main access to this venue had washed out part of the roadway and they had to use an alternative route to get back to their hotel. So not a nice weekend for our friends.
 

Brent S

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I love the rain, granted I think I am paying a ton in chemicals for my pool (last week about $110, but it was the first time I treated it in about four months). Good thing is I am not tapping into the city water to fill it. Floods not an issue for us here, but down South...they've had some bad ones.

A friend of ours went down to Bandera for a Country Music festival, the promoters learned from last years rain that they needed to do something, so this year they got one of those big circus tents for the concert. However, mid concert, law enforcement came because they were concerned about the saturation of the tent and didn't want it collapsing on the people, so they friends went into the bar, it had two inches or water in it, then the LE came in and said they had to close the bar due to flooding. So our friends sat in their car until the water receded on the roadway as the main access to this venue had washed out part of the roadway and they had to use an alternative route to get back to their hotel. So not a nice weekend for our friends.
Sure am glad you're ok anyways.
 

Silent Bob

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Brent,

I worry more about you all, than myself. Hope all is well my good friend!
 

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