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Kevin L

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good idea @Kevin L will add that to my medicinal stuff. I have a book on herbs that I intend on planting as soon as we get into our property next spring. I'm thinking the medicinal stuff will go into containers?
I actually have a little experience with herbal medicines (I learned from a Native American of Lakota and Pawnee ancestory).

A dry, cool, dark place is best for storing herbs, not a closed container.

A rack (chicken wire fencing mounted on a square rack works very well) is used to hold herbs suspended.

When using wild plants (whether for food or medicinal purposes), it's important to remember that plants should not be collected from areas near roads, train tracks, or powerlines . . . as toxic herbicides are often used in such places, and can concentrate in the plants over time. Plants collected near roads can also have large amounts of heavy metals from vehicle exhaust.

The distinction between an infusion and a decoction should be understood, and certain plants can be used in combination for a synergistic effect.

It also depends upon which time of year that the plant is harvested, as certain medicinal substances can have a higher or lower concentration depending upon the plant's stage of growth.

Certain plants deserve mention as a special case: yarrow and water hemlock fall into this category, as yarrow is very medicinal--and life-saving--for a variety of issues, while hemlock will--of course--kill you very quickly. These plants very closely resemble each other, and are easily confused with each other. They also grow in the same environment, and are plentiful where they occur.

Certain highly poisonous plants can have medicinal value. Amanita muscaria is a very dangerous mushroom (although poisoning doesn't usually cause death), but it can be sliced up and added to milk and sugar. When flies land in the mixture (attracted by the milk and sugar), they die . . . so we have a natural insecticide that helps prevent disease, as I don't have to tell you how many diseases are spread by houseflies.

And so on.

I hope this was helpful.
 
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DrJenner

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I actually have a little experience with herbal medicines (I learned from a Native American of Lakota and Pawnee ancestory).

A dry, cool, dark place is best for storing herbs, not a closed container.

A rack (chicken wire fencing mounted on a square rack works very well) is used to hold herbs suspended.

When using wild plants (whether for food or medicinal purposes), it's important to remember that plants should not be collected from areas near roads, train tracks, or powerlines . . . as toxic herbicides are often used in such places, and can concentrate in the plants over time. Plants collected near roads can also have large amounts of heavy metals from vehicle exhaust.

The distinction between an infusion and a decoction should be understood, and certain plants can be used in combination for a synergistic effect.

It also depends upon which time of year that the plant is harvested, as certain medicinal substances can have a higher or lower concentration depending upon the plant's stage of growth.

Certain plants deserve mention as a special case: yarrow and water hemlock fall into this category, as yarrow is very medicinal--and life-saving--for a variety of issues, while hemlock will--of course--kill you very quickly. These plants very closely resemble each other, and are easily confused with each other. They also grow in the same environment, and are plentiful where they occur.

Certain highly poisonous plants can have medicinal value. Amanita muscaria is a very dangerous mushroom (although poisoning doesn't usually cause death), but it can be sliced up and added to milk and sugar. When flies land in the mixture (attracted by the milk and sugar), they die . . . so we have a natural insecticide that helps prevent disease, as I don't have to tell you how many diseases are spread by houseflies.

And so on.

I hope this was helpful.
Very much so! I will write this down when I get home!
Chilling in my RV at the moment - start on call in the AM
 

Kevin L

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Lol just water and some chocolate, TERRA chips.
I’m kind of a black cloud tho so interested to see how tomorrow shakes out 😬
I hope your day goes well.

I usually start my day by reciting Kaddish for all of the healthcare people who've died from COVID. I'll be happy when this epidemic is behind us . . . although I suspect that human stupidity is what's prolonging it now.

Sleep well.
 

DrJenner

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Just picked up kindle version (under kindle unlimited) called Big Book of Mead Recipes: Over 60 Recipes From Every Mead Style (Let There Be Mead!)
Robert Ratcliff is the author. Going to try it for free as part of my subscription before I purchase it. Will let you know how it goes.
I think good alcohol and a way to make it will be important for bartering in a SHTF situation.
 

Kevin L

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Just picked up kindle version (under kindle unlimited) called Big Book of Mead Recipes: Over 60 Recipes From Every Mead Style (Let There Be Mead!)
Robert Ratcliff is the author. Going to try it for free as part of my subscription before I purchase it. Will let you know how it goes.
I think good alcohol and a way to make it will be important for bartering in a SHTF situation.
I agree. People always budget for booze.
 

YouGotKale

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I actually have a little experience with herbal medicines (I learned from a Native American of Lakota and Pawnee ancestory).

A dry, cool, dark place is best for storing herbs, not a closed container.

A rack (chicken wire fencing mounted on a square rack works very well) is used to hold herbs suspended.

When using wild plants (whether for food or medicinal purposes), it's important to remember that plants should not be collected from areas near roads, train tracks, or powerlines . . . as toxic herbicides are often used in such places, and can concentrate in the plants over time. Plants collected near roads can also have large amounts of heavy metals from vehicle exhaust.

The distinction between an infusion and a decoction should be understood, and certain plants can be used in combination for a synergistic effect.

It also depends upon which time of year that the plant is harvested, as certain medicinal substances can have a higher or lower concentration depending upon the plant's stage of growth.

Certain plants deserve mention as a special case: yarrow and water hemlock fall into this category, as yarrow is very medicinal--and life-saving--for a variety of issues, while hemlock will--of course--kill you very quickly. These plants very closely resemble each other, and are easily confused with each other. They also grow in the same environment, and are plentiful where they occur.

Certain highly poisonous plants can have medicinal value. Amanita muscaria is a very dangerous mushroom (although poisoning doesn't usually cause death), but it can be sliced up and added to milk and sugar. When flies land in the mixture (attracted by the milk and sugar), they die . . . so we have a natural insecticide that helps prevent disease, as I don't have to tell you how many diseases are spread by houseflies.

And so on.

I hope this was helpful.
Just picked up 3 new books:
I just found this helpful book. We're looking into a lot of medicinal prep since my husband is disabled with lots of pain. It's called The Home Doctor. It tells you what OTC meds are and aren't okay to take after the expiration date, most important meds to stockpile, plants for pain, physical signs of inflammation, and even breast health for women.

The Home Doctor
 

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