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Danil54grl

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Ordinary white rice should be one of the primary emergency foods every family has stored in their home. White rice goes well as a side dish with almost any meal (including wild game and fresh fish). White rice is normally enriched with several vitamins and it is a complex carbohydrate which is something the human body needs. There are a vast multitude of recipes that use white rice as a primary ingredient.

White rice is extremely cheap when compared to other foods. A ten-pound bag of white rice can be purchased at many grocery stores for about six-dollars (or a twenty-pound bag for about twelve-dollars). At approximately 60-cents per pound you are buying 1,500 calories per pound or 15,000 calories per ten-pound bag. That is a true bargain. And white rice has a shelf life between twenty to thirty-years if stored in a cool, dry area that is kept between 40 to 70 degrees year round. (Note: Brown rice has a shelf life of six-months or less.)

In a hard times survival situation a ten-pound bag of white rice would feed one person for about 52 days if the person ate 1.5-cup of cooked rice per day (equal to 1/2 cup uncooked rice). This would be approximately 300 calories per day from rice. A recommended one-year food supply of white rice for one person would be approximately 70 pounds of white rice. Obviously other foods would also need to be eaten but the white rice could serve as an inexpensive part of the daily menu.

White Rice1 cup uncooked dry rice = 3 cups cooked rice.
Measure the white rice. Do not rinse the rice. Boil the rice in twice the volume of water with a pinch of salt. Trickle the white rice into the water so the water doesn't stop boiling. Cover the pot and let it simmer 15 to 18 minutes over very low heat until all the water is absorbed. Do not stir while simmering. Stirring causes the grains to stick together. Do not lift the lid until the rice is almost done or you will release essential steam and moisture. When done, remove the pot from the heat and fluff the rice with a fork. Cover and let stand another 5 minutes. The rice will continue to steam and absorb flavors.

Rice Substitutions
White rice can be substituted for bread crumbs in meatloaf, in meatball, and in poultry stuffing recipes. Rice can also be used to add body and texture to any soup.

Rice Flour
Uncooked white rice can be ground into a fine powder. It can then be used as a thickener or binder instead of flour. It is particularly useful for sauces. It can be cooked with milk and flavorings for a smooth dessert (see the Rice Sundae dessert recipe below). Since rice does not contain gluten it can't be used to make a yeast bread loaf. However, it can be added to biscuits to improve their texture, and to cake, pancake, and pizza dough. It can be used in equal amounts with wheat flour or cornmeal. However, most people prefer a 1/4 to 1/3 ratio of white rice flour to wheat flour.

The Basic Burrito (or Stuffed Tortilla)
A little cooked white rice can be added to the other ingredients in a Burrito, such as refried beans and meat (ground or sliced).

Rice and Beans
The meal of choice for balanced nutrition and energy. Any kind of beans may be used. Any ratio of white rice to beans may be used. However, most people prefer a ratio of half rice and half beans. The addition of some diced onion to the mixture is a flavor enhancement preferred by many people.

Feathered Rice (Serves Four)
1 cup uncooked white rice 1 tsp. salt 2.5 cups boiling water
Unlike ordinary cooked white rice, this recipe causes the rice to puff up and become light and fluffy. Preheat oven to 400°F. Spread the uncooked white rice evenly on a shallow baking pan. Place in the oven and bake at 400°F, stirring occasionally, until the rice is a golden brown. Put the rice into a 1-quart casserole dish, add the salt and the boiling water. Cover with a tight-fitting lid and bake at 400°F for 20 minutes. (Note: A pound of white rice may be browned and then stored in an airtight container until it is ready to be baked.)

Mexican or Spanish Rice (Serves Four)
1 cup uncooked white rice 2 tbsp. oil 1 tsp. onion powder 1/4 cup diced tomatoes
2 cups chicken broth 1 tbsp. butter 1 tsp. garlic powder 1/8 cup diced green peppers
Heat the oil and butter in a 2 quart pan over medium heat. When the butter is melted, add the white rice and simmer, stirring constantly, for about 3 minutes until lightly browned. Add the onion and garlic and continue to simmer and stir for 5 more minutes. Add the broth and bring to a boil without stirring. Reduce heat. Gently stir in the tomatoes and peppers. Cover and simmer until all the liquid is absorbed (about 15 to 18 minutes). When done, remove the pot from the heat and fluff the rice with a fork. Cover and let stand another 5 minutes. The rice will continue to steam and absorb flavors.

Indian Rice (Serves Four)
1 cup uncooked white rice 1 tbsp. onion powder 1/2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. ground turmeric or rosemary
2 cups water 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon 1/4 tsp. pepper 2/3 cup raisins (optional)
Heat 2 tbsp. water to boiling in a 2-quart saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion powder, cinnamon, salt, pepper, and turmeric (or rosemary) and stir. Add the remaining water and heat to boiling. Add the white rice and reduce heat. Cover and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes without stirring until all the liquid is absorbed. Fluff the rice with a fork and then stir in the raisins (optional), cover, and let stand 5 minutes.

Herb Flavored Rice (Serves Four)
1 cup uncooked white rice 1 tbsp. butter 1 tbsp. onion powder 1/4 tsp. oregano
2.5 cups water 1/4 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. ground sage 1/4 tsp. thyme
Melt the butter in 2.5-quart saucepan over medium heat. Add 2 tbsp. water and bring to a boil. Add the salt, onion, sage, oregano, thyme, and stir. Add the remaining water and heat to boiling. Add the white rice and reduce heat. Cover and simmer for 30 to 45 minutes without stirring until all the liquid is absorbed.

Baked Rice (Serves Four)
1 cup uncooked white rice 2 tbsp. butter 2 chicken (or beef) bouillon cubes
2 cups water 1 tbsp. onion powder
Preheat oven to 375°F. In a saucepan, melt the butter and add the onion powder and simmer over low heat for two minutes. Add the white rice and stir continually for 3 minutes until all the rice is coated. Add the water and bring to a boil. Add the bouillon cubes and allow them to dissolve and mix well. Pour into a 1-quart casserole, cover, and bake at 375°F for 30 minutes.
Optional: Dice a green pepper and add it with the bouillon cubes.
Optional: Add up to 1 cup of diced Spam when pouring into the casserole dish.

Rice Pilaf (Serves Four)
1 cup uncooked white rice 3 tbsp. olive oil 1/2 tsp. salt
2 cups beef broth 1 tbsp. onion powder 1/4 tsp. pepper
Heat the oil and the onion powder in a saucepan. Add the white rice and simmer over low heat for 3 minutes. Add the salt, pepper, and beef broth. Cover saucepan and cook for 20 minutes (or transfer to a covered casserole and bake at 350°F for 1 hour).
Optional: Sauté 1 cup chopped mushrooms in 2 tbsp. butter and add with the broth.
Optional: Replace beef with chicken broth and add 1/2 tsp. tarragon.
Optional: Add 1 cup cooked diced beef or chicken with the broth.

Rice-A-Roni (Serves Four)
Follow the above recipe for Rice Pilaf but add 1 cup of Spaghetti noodles broken into small pieces one-inch or shorter. Brown the broken spaghetti in the oil with the onion powder at the beginning of the above Rice Pilaf recipe.

Stuffed Grape (or Cabbage) Leaves (Serves Six)
30 young grape leaves 1/2 cup oil 1 tbsp. dried mint
1 cup uncooked white rice 1/2 tbsp. onion powder 1 tbsp. parsley or dill or both
3 cups cooked ground meat 1 tbsp. garlic powder 1/2 tsp. salt and 1/4 tsp. pepper
Drop the leaves (about 4-inch diameters) in boiling water for 30 seconds and remove with a slotted spoon, drain, and set aside. Heat 4 tbsp. of oil in a saucepan and add the onion powder. Add the garlic, mint, parsley, salt, and pepper. Simmer for 5 minutes. Mix in the uncooked white rice and the cooked ground meat. Remove from heat. Place a leaf shiny side down and put 1 to 2 tbsp. of the mixture in the center of the leaf. Fold like an envelope and roll up but not too tightly. Put the rest of the oil in the bottom of a pot or Dutch oven and arrange the leaf rolls in rows and layers with the seam side down. Cover the rolls with water. Put a lid on the pot and simmer on low heat for 35 minutes.
Variation: Instead of grape leaves, use cabbage, spinach, etc.
Variation: Instead of ground meat, cover the leaf rolls with beef broth instead of water and simmer for 35 minutes.

Fried Rice (Leftover White Rice) (Serves One)
1/2 cup cooked white rice 2 tbsp. oil 1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. garlic powder 1 tbsp. soy sauce 1/4 tsp. pepper
1 tbsp. onion powder 1 tbsp. ketchup green onion (optional)
Heat the oil in a frying pan or wok. Add the garlic and onion powders and stir-fry for 30 seconds. Add the cooked white rice and stir-fry until coated with oil. Stir in the soy sauce and ketchup. Add salt and pepper to taste. Heat for a few minutes until very hot. Serve immediately. If available, garnish with diced or shredded wild green onion.

Sweet Rice (Leftover White Rice) (Serves One)
1/2 cup cooked white rice 2 tbsp. butter
1 tbsp. sugar (granulated or brown) 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
Combine all and heat in the oven or in a microwave until warm. Serve as a sweet breakfast treat, or as an afternoon snack, or as a dessert.

Pot Luck Pie (Leftover White Rice) (Serves Six)
1 Pie Crust Assorted leftover vegetables, cooked white rice, and/or cooked meat
Mix ANY combination of different, assorted leftovers together (at least 3 or 4 different items) and put them all inside a pie crust. Put a top on the pie and bake in a 350°F oven for 30 minutes. The pie is absolutely delicious. The flavor and versatility of this pot luck pie recipe is rarely appreciated until after it has been tried at least once.

Warm Tuna and Rice (Serves Four)
2 cups cooked white rice 3 tbsp. butter 1 tbsp. celery powder
5 oz. can tuna, drained 1 tbsp. onion powder 1 tbsp. parsley flakes
Melt the butter in a saucepan. Add the onion, celery, and parsley and simmer for 2 minutes. Add the tuna and the cooked white rice. Stir while heating thoroughly. Add salt and pepper as desired.
Variation: Substitute one cup of diced Spam for the tuna.

Chilled Tuna and Rice Salad (Serves Four)
2 cups cooked white rice 1 pickle, minced 1 or 2 tomatoes, cut into small wedges
5 oz. can tuna in oil 1 or 2 green onions, minced 1/2 cup mushrooms or olives (optional)
Mix all ingredients and serve cold.
Variation: Substitute one cup of diced Spam for the tuna.

Chilled Rice, Fruit, and Tuna Salad (Serves Four)
1.5 cups cooked white rice 6 oz. can tuna, drained 16 oz. can fruit cocktail, drained
Combine the cooked white rice and fruit cocktail. Mix well. Refrigerate for 1 hour to blend the flavors. Stir in the tuna and serve.
Variation: Substitute one cup of diced Spam for the tuna.

Chilled Blueberry and Mint Rice Pudding (Serves Four)
1.5 cups cooked white rice 1 cup blueberries 1 tbsp. chopped mint
1 cup low fat milk 3 tbsp. sugar nutmeg (optional garnish)
Combine all (except mint and nutmeg) in a saucepan and cook for 15 to 20 minutes over low heat, stirring frequently. Transfer the pudding to a large bowl and stir in the mint. Chill for a least 1 hour before serving. Spoon into serving bowls and sprinkle nutmeg garnish over pudding.

Warm Rice Pudding (Serves Four)
1/2 cup uncooked white rice 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 cup sugar (granulated or brown)
1 quart milk 1/2 tsp. cinnamon 1/2 cup raisins (optional)
Mix all ingredients and pour into a greased baking dish. Bake at 275°F for 3 hours. Stir frequently during the first hour. Add 1/2 cup raisins during the final 30 minutes.

Chilled Rice Sundae (Serves Four)
1/4 cup GROUND uncooked white rice 1 tsp. vanilla extract 3 tbsp. granulated sugar 2.5 cups milk 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon Berries, or Nuts, or Chocolate Syrup
Combine ground white rice, milk, vanilla extract, cinnamon, and sugar in a saucepan. Bring to a boil stirring constantly. Reduce heat and simmer for 30 to 40 minutes, stirring occasionally. (Add a little milk if it begins to dry out.) Allow to cool. When cool, spoon into dessert dishes and chill in the refrigerator. Serve with fresh berries (and/or chopped nuts) (or chocolate syrup) on top.

Chilled Rice Beverage or Milkshake
2 cups cooked white rice 2 tbsp. honey
2 cups low fat milk 1/4 tsp. ground cinnamon
Combine all ingredients in a jar and shake vigorously. Refrigerate for 4 hours or over overnight.
For a beverage, strain the rice and reserve the liquid. Fill two glasses with ice and pour the liquid over the ice. Serve chilled. (If you wish, you may use the rice in the pot luck pie recipe described above.)
For a rice milkshake, do not strain but pour the rice and liquid mixture into a blender and blend until creamy. Serve cold.
 

RV-Kitty

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Actually we don't need carbohydrates in our diet. Our bodies can make all the glucose need from protein and fat. That's the basis Atkins diet uses. I believe the process is called gluconeogenesis. When we don't consume carbs, our body switches to FAT for energy and so the obese lose weight. When the fat is gone, it will use protein. :) Humans can use either fat or protein for energy as we are omnivores.

There is no daily minimum requirement for carbs/sugsrs/starches.
 

Kenny Lee

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True, it can do that, but in terms of economics and prepping, carbs are much cheaper to buy. I don't do the atkins diet for many reasons.

1. It is too damn expensive to eat protein all the time and what little protein I put in from meat I try to keep it good quality.

2. Although agriculture has been something new to us, it is also very efficient as oppose to the hunter gather, herding life style. I don't know if the world could be sustained if everyone went atkins.

3. Grains are delicious and tasty. Farmers and civilization has risen and fallen through grain, revolutions have been fought for bread.

4. I don't think carbs are to blame for obesity, poor diet, increased portions, and LACK of physical activity has contributed to this. Office work is not industrial work, it is not farm work, we don't need to eat that much junk. If you want to eat, burn it off after work at the gym.

5. The quality of our food went to crap in the 50's and 60's with the "new is better" idea. Processing this, marketing that, bleaching flour, perservatives and stuff. Watch the movie "King Corn". Corn is in everything.
 

RV-Kitty

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True, it can do that, but in terms of economics and prepping, carbs are much cheaper to buy. I don't do the atkins diet for many reasons.
Carbs are cheaper. That's true.

1. It is too damn expensive to eat protein all the time and what little protein I put in from meat I try to keep it good quality.
2. Although agriculture has been something new to us, it is also very efficient as oppose to the hunter gather, herding life style. I don't know if the world could be sustained if everyone went atkins.
This is also true.

3. Grains are delicious and tasty. Farmers and civilization has risen and fallen through grain, revolutions have been fought for bread.
And yet all these carbs we didn't evolve with are killing us with diabetes and obesity related health problems. Tasty doesn't necessarily mean healthy eating. :( We would all be healthier and thinner if we stuck to meat and low-carb veggies/greens.

4. I don't think carbs are to blame for obesity, poor diet, increased portions, and LACK of physical activity has contributed to this. Office work is not industrial work, it is not farm work, we don't need to eat that much junk. If you want to eat, burn it off after work at the gym.
There is definitely a connection between obesity and carbs. Especially refined carbs. I don't have the time to do all the typing to explain how it works.

5. The quality of our food went to crap in the 50's and 60's with the "new is better" idea. Processing this, marketing that, bleaching flour, perservatives and stuff. Watch the movie "King Corn". Corn is in everything.
And all that corn and corn syrup is doing it's job on humanity....... and our pets since the pet food industry uses it as a cheap filler.
 

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I think it would be safe to say that after SHTF, very few people would be sitting on their behinds and doing nothing but eating so including white rice in a person's diet would not be a horrible thing. We will need calories to fuel our bodies to work in order to grow and raise more food, better food for ourselves and our families.

A carb only diet is a disaster, but rice does stretch protein out and fills bellies. As long as people remain active it shouldn't be a problem.
 

Danil54grl

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Actually we don't need carbohydrates in our diet. Our bodies can make all the glucose need from protein and fat. That's the basis Atkins diet uses. I believe the process is called gluconeogenesis. When we don't consume carbs, our body switches to FAT for energy and so the obese lose weight. When the fat is gone, it will use protein. :) Humans can use either fat or protein for energy as we are omnivores.

There is no daily minimum requirement for carbs/sugsrs/starches.
Actually, not all people can produce the right amount of glucose if one is hypoglycemic and they do need to add some kind of natural carbs to their bodies, so it can break down into sugar. I do not recommend processed sugar, like candy and such. That is only a quick fix, but sometimes, depending on the situation and how bad it is, then that is ok. Some will drink a Coke, because of it's high sugar or an Orange juice, but a piece of cheese works and is better for you. I do agree with Anorak, people wont be sitting on their butts and will have to work their "butts off" in the literal sense to survive. For some, that will be a new thing, but for others, that's just plain everyday living.
 

old_anorak

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And as far as I can figure, if it all goes to hell, what rice there is stored will be all there is to be had in a lot of areas since it isn't grown in most places. Or if it can be grown, people don't know how. I don't know how, I'd like to learn. I don't know if it grows here though.
 

Danil54grl

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And as far as I can figure, if it all goes to hell, what rice there is stored will be all there is to be had in a lot of areas since it isn't grown in most places. Or if it can be grown, people don't know how. I don't know how, I'd like to learn. I don't know if it grows here though.
White rice has a shelf life of 10 plus years, brown is less than that, but can't remember exactly of hand
 

Danil54grl

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White rice grows in the southern areas, not sure about up north. I have never seen them planted, but it has been years since I've been north. You build dikes to hold in water and once planted, you need to flood the area.
 

Kenny Lee

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There are some farmers in Vermont that is experimenting with wet growing of rice. Rice is grown in cold places like Korea and Japan as well, but it grows best in wet hot places because you can grow several rotations with no breaks. I think a poor harvest is 2 tons per acre, and a 15 tons per acre for high yield.

It is I believe a labor intensive crop, but there are several methods. The irrigation transplant into pond methods works best. Some cultures just toss it into rivers and let it grow but this doesn't have as high a yield. There are dry land varieties that don't yield much, hence why paddy rice is so predominant.

Carolina Gold rice was a good cash crop in the South, and they used special slaves from Africa that knew how to far rice to handle it, but high mortality rate due to disease and nature of the work. These African Americans have become known as the Gullahs. Caroline Gold is a heirloom variety that isn't grown much anymore.

California and the southern states are large rice producing states.
 

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Interesting. Thank you Kenny. I wonder if you could treat the water the rice is grown in to kill mosquito larvae?
 

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I think they have frogs and other animals to promote eating of larvae, and fish too in the paddies.
 

Danil54grl

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Yeah Anorak, hubby used to help with weeding the rice during the summer months when he was in highschool. He dealt with many snakes. Actually, there were a few friends together and they had "fun" killing snakes.
 

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I think it would be safe to say that after SHTF, very few people would be sitting on their behinds and doing nothing but eating so including white rice in a person's diet would not be a horrible thing. We will need calories to fuel our bodies to work in order to grow and raise more food, better food for ourselves and our families.
Yes, this is true. I was pointing out that carbs are not necessary in the human diet. Calories can come from fats. Your body will burn either. In the end, when starvation hits the human body, it will convert and devour proteins (muscle, other tissue) and then you're in deeper doodoo.

A carb only diet is a disaster, but rice does stretch protein out and fills bellies. As long as people remain active it shouldn't be a problem.
True again. The magic words are "As long as people remain active." :)
 

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I think they have frogs and other animals to promote eating of larvae, and fish too in the paddies.
I have two small ponds on my property. We use bait minnows for mosquito control. The ponds are also full of frogs and newts and occasionally two types of water turtles.
 

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White rice has a shelf life of 10 plus years, brown is less than that, but can't remember exactly of hand
But the brown rice is more nutritious. White rice loses a lot in the milling process. It also loses the natural rice flavor.
 

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Actually, not all people can produce the right amount of glucose if one is hypoglycemic and they do need to add some kind of natural carbs to their bodies, so it can break down into sugar.
I wasn't including those with abnormal sugar metabolism. Most people do not have hypoglycemia. Those with it would know how to deal with it. :)

I do not recommend processed sugar, like candy and such. That is only a quick fix, but sometimes, depending on the situation and how bad it is, then that is ok. Some will drink a Coke, because of it's high sugar or an Orange juice, but a piece of cheese works and is better for you.
Sugar in processed form is nothing but empty calories that spike your insulin level and make your cells insulin resistant. As treats they wont matter much but too many people "sugar-up" every day, several times a day. Constantly spiking their insulin. The result can be both obesity (with all it's ills) or diabetes. Complex carbs are a far better choice to fill up on when meat and other foods are scarce than breads, rolls, cookies, cake and other junk foods.

I do agree with Anorak, people wont be sitting on their butts and will have to work their "butts off" in the literal sense to survive. For some, that will be a new thing, but for others, that's just plain everyday living.
 
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