Helpful Info. To Flee or Not To Flee

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melissa7

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This was a very informational read. But I did get depressed towards the end, thinking about the probability of my survival being low. I don't want to give up and just die, I want to try my best to survive. This pdf points out the reality of how difficult it would be to survive in the wilderness (literally).

However, I perked up when I read about those vacuum seal plastic bags. I have 3 of the large ones, and I can tell you that they really work. And not just for soft stuff...I've thrown all kinds of stuff in them, and they become really flat when the air is vacuumed out. I was thinking of how good an idea these bags would be when packing a BOB. They come in different sizes, are made of a sturdy plastic, and are fairly cheap at Walmart. Instead of buying a pre-packaged first aid kit (which usually comes in a plastic or metal box), one could buy their first aid supplies separately, and then pack them in a vacuum bag. Suck the air out and you have a manageable-sized kit.

Also, zip-lock bags. They also come in all different sizes and would be excellent for separating different items. For example, toothpicks in one, matches in another, etc. Throw the zip-lock bags into the vacuum bag, and you're set. Plus, having some extra zip-lock bags could come in handy...to cover feet before putting on boots when it's wet or snowy out so your socks stay dry, to carry wet items in until you can build a fire, to carry left-over cooked rabbit in, or other foraged food or plants. You could cut them to cover a wound and keep it dry...there are lots of possibilities.

Anyways, just wanted to thank you for sharing this one. I found it helpful and it gave me lots of ideas. :)
 

jontte

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melissa7,
whatever you can use that serves your purpose is good,and you have covered that important thing;space is premium and those vacum bags
keep stuff dry.
 

Silent Bob

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This was a very informational read. But I did get depressed towards the end, thinking about the probability of my survival being low. I don't want to give up and just die, I want to try my best to survive. This pdf points out the reality of how difficult it would be to survive in the wilderness (literally).

However, I perked up when I read about those vacuum seal plastic bags. I have 3 of the large ones, and I can tell you that they really work. And not just for soft stuff...I've thrown all kinds of stuff in them, and they become really flat when the air is vacuumed out. I was thinking of how good an idea these bags would be when packing a BOB. They come in different sizes, are made of a sturdy plastic, and are fairly cheap at Walmart. Instead of buying a pre-packaged first aid kit (which usually comes in a plastic or metal box), one could buy their first aid supplies separately, and then pack them in a vacuum bag. Suck the air out and you have a manageable-sized kit.

Also, zip-lock bags. They also come in all different sizes and would be excellent for separating different items. For example, toothpicks in one, matches in another, etc. Throw the zip-lock bags into the vacuum bag, and you're set. Plus, having some extra zip-lock bags could come in handy...to cover feet before putting on boots when it's wet or snowy out so your socks stay dry, to carry wet items in until you can build a fire, to carry left-over cooked rabbit in, or other foraged food or plants. You could cut them to cover a wound and keep it dry...there are lots of possibilities.

Anyways, just wanted to thank you for sharing this one. I found it helpful and it gave me lots of ideas. :)
Melissa,

I use the vacuum seal bags for everything, clothes, even fire starter stuff that has to be dry (throw a moisture sorbent in there too), all my rounds that are placed in my BOB's are sealed in them, they are high and dry. Even my radios are placed in there, with batteries separate. You name it, sealed. while some people will say that is crap. I had my wife always seal them on a deployment. Guess who had dry socks in the field, didn't matter if it was an exercise or the real thing. We actually went through two sealers during that period and had family send them via mail to our APO when we were overseas. I consider them a necessary item for BOB preparation.

I would have loved owning stock in Ziplock bag...when we run out in the kitchen, my wife doesn't even place them on the list, as she just walks out to the store room and pulls another one off the shelf. These are a must!
 

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