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Dies Irae

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1. Survival isn't a game of chance it’s a game of skill, so learn as many skills, techniques and survival strategies as you can. Take courses, read books and magazines, watch YouTube -– just be careful where you look.Choose skills that work for you, develop your own technique and hone it. Think of skills as tools.

2.Remember in disaster situations that most homes have a hot water heater with anywhere from 40-80 gallons of fresh water storage that can be drained and used.

3. A sheet of aluminum foil is very handy for creating a dry fire base by laying it out on the ground to start a fire on. You can also cut strips of it and short out a battery to create a spark. Fold up a sheet for your kit.

4. A shelter is an important survival tool in the wilderness. It can protect you from the weather elements as well as some wildlife. Making a tent can be quite simple. However, avoid the following mistakes while building one.

  • Never build a shelter on damp ground, ever.
  • Never build a shelter on highlands or top of hills. The wind can get cold at night and with no trees to resist; you run the risk of your shelter blown away by the gusts.
  • Similarly, avoid making a shelter in the bottom of a narrow valley. Cold wind collects there are you will have a tough time during the night.
5.
Although there may be water all around you in the wilderness, drinking water from a stagnant puddle or a lake is not advisable. Drinking from a flowing stream is always better than drinking from a stagnant pool of water. However, there can be a situation where you may not have any option. In that case, you can construct a portable water filter. Here is how you do it.

  • Find an empty bottle or a container: Any empty container will do. If you can’t find one, you can always make one using birch barks.
  • Poke small holes in the bottom of the container: Make small holes with a pencil or a stick.
  • Now fill the bottle up to an inch or two with following material: Coarse gravel, coarse sand, charcoal and fine sand. You can get the charcoal from your fire that you made in step 2. Just collect the charcoal and crush it up into a fine power.
  • Add water to the top layer of fine sand. As water percolates through the fine sand, then through the charcoal, the coarse sand, and the gravel, it will get filtered. Collect the water coming out through the openings you created.
 

BillMasen

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I once heard a fire inspector say that he never slept any higher up than on the third floor of a hotel. Also, he would always demand a room facing the main street and never the back alley. The reason was that the ladder of a fire truck typically can't go any higher up than the third floor. If you are stuck any higher up, no one can get to you. Also, a huge fire truck can't fit in a back alley. So even if you are not even too high up, there will be no ladder available anyways. He also said that he always had a fire mask ready by the bed. Apparently most people die from smoke intoxication and sometimes you only have minutes from you hear the alarm until you pass out. You may get out of your room but you will probably die in the hallway. So always ask for a room on the bottom floors, with windows facing the main street and bring a fire mask :)
 

Brent S

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It's not the big animals we have to worry about, they pretty much know that encounters with humans are fatal and avoid humans like the plague. It's the small ones that will getcha

Cottonmouth Moccasin (Less likely to run away than other snakes. If not angered they may slither away, but once they get their dander up, it's a fight to the death every time)


Red Paper Wasp (Rated 3 on the 4 point Schmidt Pain Index. They are even more irascible than cottonmouths)


Yellow Jacket (only 2 on the Schmidt Index, but they come at you in a swarm if you step on their nest)
You sure that picture isn’t a copperhead?
 

DrHenley

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You sure that picture isn’t a copperhead?
Definitely a cottonmouth. I've seen plenty that looked just like that. The easily recognizable feature that gives them their name is the white inside the mouth. Young cottonmouths have a more vivid banding pattern than when they get older, very striking. As they get older the bands get wider and they get progressively darker until they are almost all black. Another feature that is more pronounced when young is the yellow tip on the tail.

Copperhead banding pattern is different, with the dark bands being roughly hourglass shaped.
 
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Brent S

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Definitely a cottonmouth. I've seen plenty that looked just like that. The easily recognizable feature that gives them their name is the white inside the mouth. Young cottonmouths have a more vivid banding pattern than when they get older, very striking. As they get older they get progressively darker until they are almost all black. Another feature that is more pronounced when young is the yellow tip on the tail.

Copperhead banding pattern is different, with the dark bands being roughly hourglass shaped.
I’ve handled 100’s of snakes in my lifetime, usually the only one running towards one while everyone else is running away. One thing I’ve learned is there can be a huge difference in appearance from one individual to another, and from a juvenile to an adult. I grew up in central Florida and 98% of all the cotton mouths were very dark there. The shape of this guy in the picture looks right but I’ve never seen one so light colored.
 

DrHenley

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I was on a canoe trip one time and we beached on a sandbar. There was a little cottonmouth on the sandbar no bigger around than a pencil that looked just like the one in the picture (open mouth and all)

And that was HIS sandbar and he was not going to give it up. He came at me unprovoked when I stepped out of the canoe and I had to beat him back with the canoe paddle. He never backed down an inch as I beat him to death with the paddle.
 

Brent S

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I was on a canoe trip one time and we beached on a sandbar. There was a little cottonmouth on the sandbar no bigger around than a pencil that looked just like the one in the picture (open mouth and all)

And that was HIS sandbar and he was not going to give it up. He came at me unprovoked when I stepped out of the canoe and I had to beat him back with the canoe paddle. He never backed down an inch as I beat him to death with the paddle.
Yeah, I’ve had them come at me before too. Very territorial little beggars and not afraid of anything. Very different from most snake species.
 

Brent S

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Glad I live in a place with only one quite rare poisonous snake , the Adder and its bite is rarely fatal.
Here in the states there’s like 1.5 average deaths per year from snake bite. Definitely not deserving of most people’s irrational fear of them. Now, gangrene and tissue damage is a whole other story, but deaths are really rare.
 

Psalm7

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The last cotton mouth I saw was nearly black but you could make out the bands if you looked close . It was on the upper end of Woods Reservoir where its almost a wilderness area . There's no mistaken the copperhead for me . Iv had to many run ins with them .
 

tmttactical

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I have an agreement with all snakes. In their natural habitat, I will leave them alone, IF, they will leave me alone. In my yard / living space. they will most like be killed upon sight.
 

KateMTx

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Growing up there were a lot of copperheads around the farm and cottonmouths down at the creek and around the pond. We had several different types of rattlesnakes too out in the fields. We were always taught not to reach into or kick a pile of leaves but to use a rake or hoe, and to be careful when walking through tall grass or around the water. We did kill quite a few of those snakes over the years.
 

Brent S

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When I was a boy diamondback rattlers were common over 6’. Now, due to people not just letting them be but actually hunting them they are close to endangered and you hardly ever see large ones anymore. I agree I really don’t want them close to the house but even poisonous ones have their place in the world.
 

Dies Irae

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  • 1. Learn at least few basic knots.


    2. Most poisonous snakes have a pupil that resembles a cat's; an oblong shape with peaked ends, like a slit in the center of the eye. Non-venomous snakes usually have round pupils. There is always the exception. The coral snake, a very venomous snake in the United States, has round pupils.

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    3. If you encounter a mountain lion maintain eye contact. Never run past or away from a mountain lion. Don't bend over or crouch down. Aggressively wave your arms, throw stones or branches, do not turn away.

    4. The first thing you should do if you're stranded in the wild is find a source of drinkable water. The most obvious sources are streams, rivers and lakes. Animals always know where the water is, so be on the lookout for wildlife or animal tracks. Lush green vegetation is also a sign that water is nearby. Swarming insects may be a hassle, but they also signal that a water source isn't far away. Bird flight paths in the morning or evening can point you in the right direction. Stay on the move until you find a water source. When you pause to rest, use your ears -- rivers can be heard in the quiet woods from great distances. Remember that water always flows downhill, so low-lying areas and valleys are a good bet.

    5. Always have some aluminum foil with you.
    Too many uses to type them all so just a few.
    Boiling Water. In any survival situation, it is important to stay hydrated. ...
    Signal for Help. ...
    Make Fishing Lures. ...
    Water Bottle Repair. ...
    Sharpen Dull Scissors. ...
    Fix Loose Batteries. ...
    Keep Your Matches Dry. ...
    Scrub Dirty Pots and Pans.
    Etc.etc.etc

    No need to carry the whole roll but at least few folded pieces
 

Dies Irae

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JackDW you dont know what you are missing.... could be love at first sight if you would just stare in its eyes for a bit ☺

But if the snake already managed to bite you there is no point in keeping distance anymore and eyes are one more thing to help you know what you are dealing with.Same goes if you killed it and want to eat it
 

Brent S

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JackDW you dont know what you are missing.... could be love at first sight if you would just stare in its eyes for a bit ☺

But if the snake already managed to bite you there is no point in keeping distance anymore and eyes are one more thing to help you know what you are dealing with.Same goes if you killed it and want to eat it
Hey, snakes make great pets. They don’t bark, they don’t need to be taken out to do their business, as a matter of fact they only do their business like once a month, they only need to be fed every few weeks, and if you forget to check on them they are fine. They are also tasty in a pinch! Seriously, they aren’t slimy and mostly only bite when threatened. Don’t just go hunting to kill them for no reason.
 

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