Shelf Life of Re-packaged Foods

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QuietH3art

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I saw on one of the threads that dry goods such as rice, flour and pasta can be re-packaged into mylar bags with O2 absorbers increasing the shelf life to about 10 years.
Does anyone know if this would also be true of yeast? Does it make a difference whether it is the individual packets of Active Dry Yeast left in the packet then put into the mylar with O2 absorber or would it be better to get it in the jar and repackage it into mylar. Both types have about a 1 year shelf life normally.
Also, does anyone know if you can repackage dried fruit or nuts into mylar with O2 absorbers to extend their shelf life? They also have about a 1 year shelf life.
 

Trapper

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Yeast will last a bit longer if left in the fridge or freezer. In my knowledge, it does not keep well much longer than the expiration date.
We keep nuts in the freezer, especially pecans, for several years if packed so they don't freezer burn.
Rice will keep for well over 10+ years in mylar. 20 years would be my limit.
Pasta will keep 10 years, but again I would try to use it all in that time period. I do keep a lot of pasta in jars in our storage room. Some have been there for several years without issues. I try to rotate my pasta every 3 years or so.
Beans can be kept 30 years if stored in mylar and buckets.
Flour has a poor shelf life. The general rule is not to keep it longer than 1 year. Flour can go rancid from the natural oils in it. As soon as the wheat is ground it deteriorates. Flour is "enriched" as any nutrition is destroyed in the milling process. The nutrition is sprayed back into the flour. Your better off getting wheat stored and grinding your own flour. Wheat will last indefinitely and fresh flour has the best nutrition content.

Try to develop a plan to rotate and use the foods you store. I have a prepper friend that buys food by the buckets and puts them away. He has no idea how to cook any of it. He says he and his wife will figure it out when the time comes. I think that is foolish. Also, having a large diet change is the last thing you want to do when your already under stress from a SHTF situation.
Store what you eat, eat what your store!
Here is a link for the cheapest mylar and storage items I have found anywhere. Shipping is cheap also. Many of your questions maybe found on their website. Hope it helps!!

https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/...ime_temperature_moisture_oxygen_and_light.htm
 

old_anorak

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You might also consider getting a sourdough starter going so that you don't need to rely on bought yeast.
 

QuietH3art

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Thanks so much for that link, Trapper. Lots of great information there.

I'll check out the sourdough idea, anorak, thanks.
 

DrHenley

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Your better off getting wheat stored and grinding your own flour. Wheat will last indefinitely and fresh flour has the best nutrition content.
How do you recommend grinding the wheat? Is there a home mill for that?

We plant wheat in our food plots for deer. I've never tried harvesting it, but I have thought about it.
 

Trapper

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There are several wheat grinders on the market. The country living grain mill gets the best reviews it can be powered by hand or by a motor. There are several models on the market. I suggest researching them thoroughly to decide which one would work for you as they are quite expensive the cheaper models do not seem to work as good. It is best to grind flour as its needed. Wheat grinds to a 1~1 ratio when making flour, something to keep in mind when trying to decide how much wheat to store.
 

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