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GaRp58

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After posting that sailors/rope makers knife, I realised that I have my Bugout knife in a special case.
The knife is hand forged in Hamburg, Germany, the sheath hand sewn in Zwiefalten, Germany and the fire steel is imported from Hong Kong...my special combination with a sheath with no snaps, velcro or moving parts to break or fail in use. Hangs on my belt or fits into any cargo pocket.
If you look close at the last pic, you can see 3 of my fingers reflecting in the shiny hand polished blade as I took the photo...the original rough surface of the knife back is sharp edged and great for striking a spark without leaving the typical black spark-marks on a normally nice blade which ruins the appearance then.
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GaRp58

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Still finding stuff now that I started looking into my cold weather bag for the car...
This is one sheath, it holds a knife and a small hatchet, both with pacmayer type rubber grips.
You can shave with both, manufactured by HERBERTZ in Germany in 420 steel.
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tmttactical

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I recently started a little side business sharpening knives, scissors and axes. The first small group of axes I sharpened had very bad edges, chipped and very dull. I did manage to remove the chips but was unsure just how sharp to make the edge. Thanks to Articdude, I now know it is acceptable to make a very sharp edge on them. I was worried about an accidental bounce back severely injuring the user.
 

Dave2001

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I can remember a time when Schrade and Puma were my two favorite knife manufacturers, but my Schrades were Uncle Henrys. I seem to recall that at that time the Uncle Henrys were all 440C and the Old Timers were carbon steel, which I guess is why they were called "Old Timers."
I dont buy ANY knife made in CHINA!!!!!
 

GaRp58

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Thanks to Articdude, I now know it is acceptable to make a very sharp edge on them. I was worried about an accidental bounce back severely injuring the user.
Every sharp edge is better than a dull one. Just like the trigger finger control...you must control your blade. There have been toooo many people hurt by an axe or hatchet not being sharp enough to "BITE" into the wood and be deflected away from the wood to be cut, only to cut a leg, foot or hand, or worse, the tool flys away from your hands and hits an innocent standing further away...children and such. The sharper the better, Tmtactical.
 

Arcticdude

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I recently started a little side business sharpening knives, scissors and axes. The first small group of axes I sharpened had very bad edges, chipped and very dull. I did manage to remove the chips but was unsure just how sharp to make the edge. Thanks to Articdude, I now know it is acceptable to make a very sharp edge on them. I was worried about an accidental bounce back severely injuring the user.
There are times when I need to skin a beaver, bear or other big critter with my hatchet, so I need to keep them razor sharp. It's much easier to carry out a few beaver hides than it is to pack out the whole animal.
I carry a Gransfor Bruks light hatchet in my pack basket for cutting stakes etc. I keep it razor sharp too.
A lot of people seldom sharpen a hatchet and don't know how to handle one that is truly sharp. I'd recommend that you write up a disclaimer whenever you sharpen a hatchet to a razor sharp edge.
 

Kevin L

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There are times when I need to skin a beaver, bear or other big critter with my hatchet, so I need to keep them razor sharp. It's much easier to carry out a few beaver hides than it is to pack out the whole animal.
I carry a Gransfor Bruks light hatchet in my pack basket for cutting stakes etc. I keep it razor sharp too.
A lot of people seldom sharpen a hatchet and don't know how to handle one that is truly sharp. I'd recommend that you write up a disclaimer whenever you sharpen a hatchet to a razor sharp edge.
Can't you eat beaver? I would imagine that it tastes like chicken.
 

Arcticdude

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Can't you eat beaver? I would imagine that it tastes like chicken.
Beaver is very good eating. Usually I cut the hams off and some other pieces of meat. Some areas where I'm trapping is a long way from where I can park my Jeep and even too far from my tracked vehicle or boat. It's not uncommon to catch several 40 - 60+ pound beaver in a day, plus coon, muskrat and maybe a fox or coyote too. That's too much for this old man to pack out at one time. The hides fit nicely in my pack basket though. When practical I'll bring the whole carcass home and cut up what I want to eat and make bait out of what's left.
 

DrHenley

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Mossy Oak knife.
I don't really know what to call this one. Bayonet? Dagger? Utility Knife?
I bought it as a defensive pig sticker when I was bow hunting hogs on Fort Benning. It has a 1/4" thick 8" long blade you could use as a pry bar...
Instead of a false edge like a bayonet, it has a swedge. (false edge is a sharpened edge that is not full length) I may put it on the grinder and make a real edge on top.
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tmttactical

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Every sharp edge is better than a dull one. Just like the trigger finger control...you must control your blade. There have been toooo many people hurt by an axe or hatchet not being sharp enough to "BITE" into the wood and be deflected away from the wood to be cut, only to cut a leg, foot or hand, or worse, the tool flys away from your hands and hits an innocent standing further away...children and such. The sharper the better, Tmtactical.
Thanks for the reply. I will now focus on making the axes and hatchets as sharp as I can get them. I do warn all my knife customers that their knives are now extremely sharp. An oops will cut to the bone.
 

tmttactical

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There are times when I need to skin a beaver, bear or other big critter with my hatchet, so I need to keep them razor sharp. It's much easier to carry out a few beaver hides than it is to pack out the whole animal.
I carry a Gransfor Bruks light hatchet in my pack basket for cutting stakes etc. I keep it razor sharp too.
A lot of people seldom sharpen a hatchet and don't know how to handle one that is truly sharp. I'd recommend that you write up a disclaimer whenever you sharpen a hatchet to a razor sharp edge.
Thanks for the reply. I do warn all my knife customers, so now I will warn all my axe and hatchet customers. A disclaimer is a very good idea. Will do.
 

DrHenley

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Thanks for the reply. I do warn all my knife customers, so now I will warn all my axe and hatchet customers. A disclaimer is a very good idea. Will do.
When I sharpened kitchen knives for my mother, she had to put tape on them so she would know which knives not to pick up by the blade, LOL.
 

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