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jontte

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what about cremating the body or bodies?
 

jimLE

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but then again.why not just haul them a good ways down the road and just dump them,if their the enemy... :)..that'll give others 2nd thoughts about heading into your direction...
 

jontte

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this is something to think about,as a human beeing you try to show some respect to the dead,especially if they are yours and enemy dead just could spread dicease
 

jimLE

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in my case..family and relatives alike will get buried..im not saying i will dump a enemys body somewhere thats a safe distance from my home..it's just a suggestion/idea..here's something to think about..would you go down a certain road if you knew someone down that road would do you the same way if you turned out to be a enemy ?.or would you keep going?chances are,you'll keep going.same goes for others as well.if someone else comes along and see's someone laying there dead.chances are,they'll keep going instead of showing up at my door.no threats.no shooting.and that means no buriels or what ever..plus.i'll be putting my life at risk for someone that i not only dont know.but id be putting my life at stake to bury them as well..
 

Gazrok

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Cremation. Use the oldest fuel around. Wood.
But far away, and on a dark night, preferably.
You know how visible a funeral pyre is?

If not an option, then a deep burial (about 6 feet down), with some lye on top should do the trick.
Hell of a labor though.
 

jontte

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it is, that cremation might in some ways be the easiest to do,but if it's a loved one I might dig that hole,just in case I wanna leave some flowers...
 

jimLE

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my thoughts exactly..cremate.then something for a urne.then bury them that way.plus a family member might want to keep a small amount of the ash as a memory of the loved one
 

Silent Bob

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I hope you don't take this as an offensive tone, but since my youngest son was cremated in traditional Japanese fashion, I have a bit of experience with cremation. As a result of his sudden death and we were stationed in Japan, we had limited choices, short of sending the body back to either of our parents for a burial. Far from family, other than my mother's family on mainland, my wife traumatized from the loss of our first born, the decision fell on me. Wrong or right, the decision was mine. So as you can see cremation is a very culturally sensitive issue with me. In fact as Jim mentioned, my son ashes are placed in an urn and rest traditionally in a specific shrine for him, since our current location is not our families final resting place. With this said, my intention to place this PDF had more to inform those who are not sure how to properly bury a family member the necessary consideration to respectfully intern a loved one.

I've seen the posts regarding cremations. I would like you to know that the energy needed to completely cause bone to ash white has to be very high. Simply burning a funeral pyre will not get the job done. Additionally the use of wood as a fuel source will intermix with whatever body ashes are consumed from your pyre. If that is the intent of those that choose to cremate bodies, it will be a very lengthy process requiring lots of wood to cremate the remain completely. While I respect each of your inputs, please note, that even with the high LP gas used to cremate my son, part of his skull was not completely turned into ash. So from common experience and a my family's culture that relies solely to honor their dead, it is not as easy as one might think.
 

jimLE

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sorry about your first son and all...

now that i think of it.and if i rememeber right.the temp for cremation is at least a steady temp of at least 2000 degrees.so yes itd take a lot of wood.
 

Silent Bob

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sorry about your first son and all...

now that i think of it.and if i rememeber right.the temp for cremation is at least a steady temp of at least 2000 degrees.so yes itd take a lot of wood.

Its all right Jim, his loss impacted both of us, but we were blessed with two healthy children, but not a day goes by that I don't think of him. I just wanted to weigh in on the cremation issue because 1) lots of fuel being expended, regardless of what type you use 2), like honey is to bee's, your going to attract them. Now don't get me wrong, when your dealing with a pandemic virus or large die-off, then opting for cremation might be the only solution, people just need to understand, that when opting for cremation, typical western standards of honoring the dead by taking the ashes might not be an option.
 

Wiredog8

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Bob, I offer my heart felt condolences for your family.
This is a topic that makes most very uncomfortable.
I have always thought that I would honor my fallen in the traditions of the First Peoples. I will construct raised sky alters upon which to place the fallen. Payers will be offered, tears will be shed. Memories will be cherished, and stories will be told and passed down to the young ones. It is important to carry on but to never forget.
 

jontte

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Silent Bob,
my prayers to your family.
I really don't know what to say,you and your wife must be very strong
 

Marv.Schmitz87

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As a fellow father and soldier my deepest condolences for you and your family. My family and I will include you guys in our prayers.
 

Silent Bob

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Bob, I offer my heart felt condolences for your family.
This is a topic that makes most very uncomfortable.
I have always thought that I would honor my fallen in the traditions of the First Peoples. I will construct raised sky alters upon which to place the fallen. Payers will be offered, tears will be shed. Memories will be cherished, and stories will be told and passed down to the young ones. It is important to carry on but to never forget.

You know I have always found it very fascinating to read about how the Native American respected their lost loved ones. I know that I will be cremated because I just can't see myself resting in a box. My mother who is Japanese, is Shinto and was baptized when she came to the United States, will be buried next to my dad, in the traditional Christian way.

Wiredog, didn't know you are Native American. Genealogy kept by my family says we have a bit of Haudenosaunee in our blood, but who is to say. Northeasterner's have a hard time tracking who and where we are related. I've got a good record of the Japanese and Scotch-Irish side, but during the colonial period, the family was not good at writing things down. I typically tell everyone that I am mixed Scotch-Irish and Japanese. However, because of my mixed heritage and where my family is from, we practice some similar thoughts of "Mother Earth" and her teachings. Living closer to Oklahoma, I have several Native American students in my class, so I typically introduce several lessons regarding the Plains and Texas Native American's. Since I may possibly reassigned to teach 7th grade next year, I am really looking forward introducing more of my Native American lessons. Who knows if their is a bit of money left over next year, maybe I can get my students up to the Historical Cultural Museum in Oklahoma.

As for your thoughts thank you.
 

Silent Bob

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Silent Bob,
my prayers to your family.
I really don't know what to say,you and your wife must be very strong

Thanks Jontte, Typical of men, I just buried myself in work, volunteered to go with the Marines and then took several TDY's to our site in Korea, pretty much consumed my life in work after his death. My wife, she is really tough, she is not emotion, very pragmatic and a very slow to react to anything. It's not to say that we didn't have our ups and downs in our marriage. We almost divorced with our son's loss, but then our daughter was born and things started to fall back into place again. I guess you could say, we found love again. So no worries...just the cremation issue is very culturally sensitive to me. In American, while it is solemnly handled like a Christian burial, in Japan, it is a moment of reflection and remembrance, somewhat different than Western types of gathering. In my will, I have a bit of a mix....cremation, but a huge wake. My wife and son have instruction to pull out the 32 year old scotch and for my friends to share it. Yes and its great Scotch for those who don't know me. So my friends will be treated to an old fashion Irish-wake. Just know if you plan to attend, be prepared for the bag pipes, "Scotland the Brave and Danny Boy" are my favorites...sorry for you English, but that's how us, American cousins go out in style!
 
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