MYLAR BAGS AND OXYGEN ABSORBERS

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Bravery

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Ok... I need some more Mylar bags and oxygen absorbers... where do YOU buy them? I am hoping to save some money!! But I don't want to get JUNK. I like the heavy mylar bags, not the thin ones. I also need some 500, 1000, and maybe 2000 Oxygen Absorbers.

It would break my heart to think I am properly storing some food away for WTSHTF :shtf but in reality my efforts fall short and my family is forced to suffer because of it.
 

Clyde

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Ok... I need some more Mylar bags and oxygen absorbers... where do YOU buy them? I am hoping to save some money!! But I don't want to get JUNK. I like the heavy mylar bags, not the thin ones. I also need some 500, 1000, and maybe 2000 Oxygen Absorbers.

It would break my heart to think I am properly storing some food away for WTSHTF :shtf but in reality my efforts fall short and my family is forced to suffer because of it.
I found this a Mylar Bucket Kit at Costco.

I have no clue to how to store foods in this fashion. How often do you change the oxygen absorbers?
 

Bravery

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Mylar is a clear film that block oxygen from passing through it. Often mylar is paired with foil for tensile strength ... which is why we associate the foil bags with mylar. So not all foil bags are mylar bags. Typically oxygen absorbers use powdered iron or iron filings and some form of salt.

The purpose of using mylar bags and oxygen absorbers is to remove and keep out oxygen. Just as iron becomes oxygenated and rusts, so does food... except it won't rust it will deteriorate. Oxygen supports aerobic bacteria and fungi. So by removing the oxygen you prevent these types of bacterias and fungi to grow on your food. One thing that MUST be remembered is you should NEVER store moist foods in these mylar bags. According to the LDS (The Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Day Saints... aka the Mormons) "Warning: Botulism poisoning may result if moist products are stored in packaging that reduces oxygen. When stored in airtight containers with oxygen absorbers, products must be dry (about 10% or less moisture content)." I don't follow the same beliefs as the LDS do but I have to say that I know they are great when it comes to prepping!

Botulism is a bacteria that produce one of the strongest toxins known to man. It takes just one single microgram to kill a person (Chuck Norris is the only exception... he sprinkles botulism on his cereal in the morning). A microgram is 1/1,000,000 (one millionth) of a gram.

The LDS also states:
"Products intended for longer-term storage must be dry (about 10% or less moisture content).​
Warning: Botulism poisoning may result if moist products are stored in packaging that reduces oxygen.​
Dry products that are not suitable for longer-term storage due to moisture content, oils, or other concerns include:​
longer-term storage due to moisture content, oils, or other concerns include:​
Barley, pearled​
Meat, dried (such as jerky)​
Eggs, dried​
Nuts​
Flour, whole wheat​
Rice, brown​
Grains, milled (other than rolled oats)​
Sugar, brown​
Granola​
Vegetables and fruits, dehydrated (unless dry enough, inside and out, to snap when bent)."
 

Clyde

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Mylar is a clear film that block oxygen from passing through it. Often mylar is paired with foil for tensile strength ... which is why we associate the foil bags with mylar. So not all foil bags are mylar bags. Typically oxygen absorbers use powdered iron or iron filings and some form of salt.

The purpose of using mylar bags and oxygen absorbers is to remove and keep out oxygen. Just as iron becomes oxygenated and rusts, so does food... except it won't rust it will deteriorate. Oxygen supports aerobic bacteria and fungi. So by removing the oxygen you prevent these types of bacterias and fungi to grow on your food. One thing that MUST be remembered is you should NEVER store moist foods in these mylar bags. According to the LDS (The Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Day Saints... aka the Mormons) "Warning: Botulism poisoning may result if moist products are stored in packaging that reduces oxygen. When stored in airtight containers with oxygen absorbers, products must be dry (about 10% or less moisture content)." I don't follow the same beliefs as the LDS do but I have to say that I know they are great when it comes to prepping!

Botulism is a bacteria that produce one of the strongest toxins known to man. It takes just one single microgram to kill a person (Chuck Norris is the only exception... he sprinkles botulism on his cereal in the morning). A microgram is 1/1,000,000 (one millionth) of a gram.

The LDS also states "Products intended for longer-term storage must be dry (about 10% or less moisture content).
Products intended for longer-term storage must be dry (about 10% or less moisture content).
Warning: Botulism poisoning may result if moist products are stored in packaging that reduces oxygen.
Dry products that are not suitable for longer-term storage due to moisture content, oils, or other concerns include:
longer-term storage due to moisture content, oils, or other concerns include:
Barley, pearled​

Meat, dried (such as jerky)​
Eggs, dried​

Nuts​
Flour, whole wheat​

Rice, brown​
Grains, milled (other than rolled oats)​

Sugar, brown​
Granola​

Vegetables and fruits, dehydrated (unless dry enough, inside and out, to snap when bent)​
I will write more on mylar bags and their use later... right now I'm falling asleep!!!
thanks for the information. I had no idea the Mormons were so good at food storage.
 

Clyde

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Ok... I need some more Mylar bags and oxygen absorbers... where do YOU buy them? I am hoping to save some money!! But I don't want to get JUNK. I like the heavy mylar bags, not the thin ones. I also need some 500, 1000, and maybe 2000 Oxygen Absorbers.

It would break my heart to think I am properly storing some food away for WTSHTF :shtf but in reality my efforts fall short and my family is forced to suffer because of it.
I found these from an LDS site. I hope it helps.

Oxygen Absorbers

1 Gallon Mylar Bags 7mm
 

TigerBlue

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Wait... I thought rice was good for long term storage?
I've read and seen people storing them simply in recycled dried out pop bottles? Is this not okay?
 

jeepgirl

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The only thing I've heard as far as dry goods go is that flour is hard to keep. I've also heard that white rice is better than brown rice to store.
 

Bravery

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Wait... I thought rice was good for long term storage?
I've read and seen people storing them simply in recycled dried out pop bottles? Is this not okay?
Rice is good for long term storage.

Yes, many people recommend using soda bottles (NOT milk containers). The big problem with using pop bottles (or as we say here in the south... "Coke bottles"), is sun light can break the bottles down but more importantly the light breaks down the food. If I use Coke bottles I will put them in a bag or something to keep the light away from them.

I've read that a lot of people use the Coke bottles to carry food for their bug-out stuff. Which to me makes a lot of sense... they can hold a sizable amount of food and they are handy enough to carry easily.

Make sure you use oxygen absorbers too!!! ... oh and some people like to seal the lids with duct tape. Personally, if I were to use the Coke bottles... I would use some caulk after I closed the top (just as added protection) and then put tape on it (in my mind the tape would help people senselessly opening the bottles... I can see my son just opening the bottles for no reason... the tape would be enough to keep from doing it).
 

Trapper

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Brown rice does not have as long of shelf life. It has more natural oils in it causing the rice to go rancid much more quickly than white rice. Dont use milk jugs for any food storage. The fats in the milk will actually seep into the plastic. If putting in food latter it can affect your food and spoil it. Thats why "pop" bottles (as we say in da north) work so well. Keep them in a dark place for storage.
Flour also does not keep well over 6 months. Most flour has no nutrional value after it is processed, thats why its "enriched" (read the package!). Nutrition has to be added. For the best flour get your own grinder and make your own flour. Grind only as much wheat berrys as needed. Wheat berrys will last indefinitely as long as bugs are kept out and they are dry.
 

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