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Long-Term Water Storage Methods

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Clyde

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By Dustin Eves, eHow Contributor

Storing food and drinkingwater for emergencies is always a good idea, but it becomes vital during natural disasters or economic crises. Food is easily stored in cans and other packages because it generally comes labeled with an expiration date and storage instructions. However, storing home supplies of water is not always so foolproof. Mold, bacteria and other problems can enter an emergency water supply if the water is not properly stored and treated. Using proper techniques, however, it's possible to store a long-term water supply safely.

Choosing Storage Containers
Choose containers that not only are durable, but also can be safely used for long-term storage. Use only bottles and containers previously used to store food products, such as soda or juice bottles. Also, be sure containers are plastic, because glass bottles can break and cardboard containers don't seal well and break down easily. PETE or PET plastic bottles are also better than other types of plastic bottles because they don't degrade as quickly and are better for longer-term storage. (See References 1.) Bottles of this type will usually have "PETE" printed on them somewhere, or have a number 1 surrounded by a triangle on the bottom of the container.
Also be sure, before reusing bottles that previously had non-water liquids in them, to thoroughly wash the insides using dish soap and water, rinsing all traces of soap away, then disinfecting by swishing a quart of water mixed with a teaspoon of non-scented chlorine bleach inside, making sure to coat all surfaces. Dump out the chlorine solution, and bottles are ready for water storage.
Water Treatment
Water collected from a commercially treated tap generally does not need treatment and is fine to store as-is, because most treatment facilities already add chlorine to water. Well or ground water, however, needs to be boiled vigorously for about a minute (three minutes at altitudes above one mile) and treated with non-scented chlorine bleach. After boiling, let the water cool and mix in 1/8 teaspoon of bleach for each gallon of water stored. The boiling will kill most bacteria and other harmful organisms that may be present, and the bleach will prevent more such organisms from developing later. Pour cooled water into washed bottles that meet the requirements described above, and seal as tightly as possible.
Water Storage
Water treated and stored in this method can last a few years, but it is recommended that water stores be changed once a year. Write the current date on a water container when you fill it so you know later how long it has been stored. Keep bottles in a cool, dark place (Demand Media, Inc & EHow.com, 2012).
 

Paul Mullet

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Thank you for posting this, I have learned something new today.
 

Laurie Conroy

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I have been storing water this way for a few months but am wondering how much would you need for say a 3 months supply? I have about 20 gallons so far
 

Clyde

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I have been storing water this way for a few months but am wondering how much would you need for say a 3 months supply? I have about 20 gallons so far
Hello Laurie.
I have always been told that a person should drink 8, 8oz glasses of water per day. That equal 64 ounces which equals 1/2 gallon. If this is correct for a 90 day supply of water (roughly 3 months) you would need 45 gallons per person. This is for drinking only. Obviously you would increase your quantity depending on your needs for cooking, bathing, etc.

I hope this helps.
 

Laurie Conroy

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Thanks for the info. Thats alot of water! Better get working on securing more containers LOL!
 

Hades

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Water storage is important no matter what area you live in.
Even for short term area emergencys.
Systems can be built very cheaply for extra storage area, there are places in most homes you have not even thought about.
I have seen many systems for storing water but the best ones in the jugs they come in.
Big tanks can be bought for hundreds of dollars, that hold 50-100+ gallons,
Then you have to worry about cross contamination.
Water can be caught on sale for about 1.00 a gallon, comes in its own jug, moveable and stackable in the boxes they ship it in.
 

Clyde

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Water storage is important no matter what area you live in.
Even for short term area emergencys.
Systems can be built very cheaply for extra storage area, there are places in most homes you have not even thought about.
I have seen many systems for storing water but the best ones in the jugs they come in.
Big tanks can be bought for hundreds of dollars, that hold 50-100+ gallons,
Then you have to worry about cross contamination.
Water can be caught on sale for about 1.00 a gallon, comes in its own jug, moveable and stackable in the boxes they ship it in.
This is my current conquest in the prepping inventory. I need to get a lot more water. I would ideally like to have about 100 gallons on hand.
Of course that will only last me 40 days if everyone takes in their 8, 8oz cups of water per day. Then there is the weight issue. 100 gallons would weigh 835 pounds.
I know I need to learn how to construct a water capture system.
 

Krime

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Hello Laurie.
I have always been told that a person should drink 8, 8oz glasses of water per day. That equal 64 ounces which equals 1/2 gallon. If this is correct for a 90 day supply of water (roughly 3 months) you would need 45 gallons per person. This is for drinking only. Obviously you would increase your quantity depending on your needs for cooking, bathing, etc.

I hope this helps.
although i agree with Clyde, one should also look at what climate you live in as well.
the hotter it is, the more water you'll need to store.
also, i would think the weight of a person should be considered ss well. a bigger person tends to sweat more, thereby losing body water and may require more than an average weighted person.
also, you have to think about activeness, as if a full grown man that works building or gathering etc may require extra water as well.

remember, during an emergency SHTF situation, there will ptobably be little to no power, which means no AC.

me, myself, im 6'2 227lbs, and i drink on the average 2 gallons of water a day, but im a water drinken guy lol.
 

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Trees sweat water vapour if you put big plastic bags or binliners around leafy branches you should be able to get some water not much but you could put lots of bags on lots of branches, just throwin it in there
 

medicken

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I am currently looking at adding some large storage containers, 55gal barrels, to my supplies. We currently have about 200 gal all in 1 gal plastic bottles and the 16oz size. We have dedicated a spare bedroom for all of the current storage needs including emergency food and supplies. I would like to have a Minimum of 1000 gal on site at any given time. I know that if the shtf we wont be able to take the larger containers but if we bug in we will have enough for a while. The climate here is such that capturing rainfall is not an option, so that is out. Has anyone purchased any of the 55 gal food grade barrels for water and if so, can you name a good supplier?
 

medicken

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I guess I need to be more direct. Does anyone know of a supplier of food grade 55gal barrels for water storage?
 

Hades

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I guess I need to be more direct. Does anyone know of a supplier of food grade 55gal barrels for water storage?
new or used
I typed in

Food grade barrels CA

on yahoo but you'd get the same type results from google.

and found hundreds of places, from american listed clasified to brand new ones from manufacturers
I dont know your city, so thats the best help I can give ya
 

medicken

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new or used
I typed in

Food grade barrels CA

on yahoo but you'd get the same type results from google.

and found hundreds of places, from american listed clasified to brand new ones from manufacturers
I dont know your city, so thats the best help I can give ya
I have also done an internet search. I was just curious if anyone here is using a particular brand and if it meets or exceeds expectations?
 

Hades

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I have also done an internet search. I was just curious if anyone here is using a particular brand and if it meets or exceeds expectations?
I recommend the trola 1400kxb, its made out of plastic like all of the rest of the food grade barrels, but it comes in 52 gallon not 55 gallon size, the lower 2 3/4 inches makes them easier to stack by yourself, when they are full of water. and the camo colors make them feel manly. I prefer the trola 1400kxb, because i dont like the black licorice flavor the trola 14ookxa makes your water taste like. I like the trola 1400kxb sooooo much more, I like strawberry flavored water. I wonder how they get that flavor in the plastic. I bought mine at the mexican flea market, paid 30 dollars each for them. wife is still pissy I didnt get the trola 1400kxe but we didnt know what the stickers meant at the time, it was pina-colota.



The most inportant thing about a food grade water barrel is if it dont leak, If it does that, anything else is a extra right.
 

OmegaRunner

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I currently do not have much in the way of water storage. We have only a small stockpile of bottled water in 1 gallon and smaller size bottles. However, we will be moving into a new house in a few months and I plan to start getting serious about water storage. I have looked at the 55 gallon barrels and they would be easiest to get started, but I think smaller containers would be more user friendly. I am considering a mix of 55 gallon barrels and either 5 gallon containers or the 3.5 gallon water bricks. Has anyone used or seen the waterbrick products before?
 

SSTxPrepper1

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Currently in development of a new rain water collection setup, and also in development of a filter purification setup as well. Will keep all updated as I progress with the plans. And the 55 gal water buckets have many other uses other than water just to throw out there lol.:USA:
 

Ajones

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By Dustin Eves, eHow Contributor

Storing food and drinkingwater for emergencies is always a good idea, but it becomes vital during natural disasters or economic crises. Food is easily stored in cans and other packages because it generally comes labeled with an expiration date and storage instructions. However, storing home supplies of water is not always so foolproof. Mold, bacteria and other problems can enter an emergency water supply if the water is not properly stored and treated. Using proper techniques, however, it's possible to store a long-term water supply safely.

Choosing Storage Containers
Choose containers that not only are durable, but also can be safely used for long-term storage. Use only bottles and containers previously used to store food products, such as soda or juice bottles. Also, be sure containers are plastic, because glass bottles can break and cardboard containers don't seal well and break down easily. PETE or PET plastic bottles are also better than other types of plastic bottles because they don't degrade as quickly and are better for longer-term storage. (See References 1.) Bottles of this type will usually have "PETE" printed on them somewhere, or have a number 1 surrounded by a triangle on the bottom of the container.
Also be sure, before reusing bottles that previously had non-water liquids in them, to thoroughly wash the insides using dish soap and water, rinsing all traces of soap away, then disinfecting by swishing a quart of water mixed with a teaspoon of non-scented chlorine bleach inside, making sure to coat all surfaces. Dump out the chlorine solution, and bottles are ready for water storage.
Water Treatment
Water collected from a commercially treated tap generally does not need treatment and is fine to store as-is, because most treatment facilities already add chlorine to water. Well or ground water, however, needs to be boiled vigorously for about a minute (three minutes at altitudes above one mile) and treated with non-scented chlorine bleach. After boiling, let the water cool and mix in 1/8 teaspoon of bleach for each gallon of water stored. The boiling will kill most bacteria and other harmful organisms that may be present, and the bleach will prevent more such organisms from developing later. Pour cooled water into washed bottles that meet the requirements described above, and seal as tightly as possible.
Water Storage
Water treated and stored in this method can last a few years, but it is recommended that water stores be changed once a year. Write the current date on a water container when you fill it so you know later how long it has been stored. Keep bottles in a cool, dark place (Demand Media, Inc & EHow.com, 2012).
what if you have a filtration system--should you still add the bleach??
 

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