long term coffee storage?

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mattrow89

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Was wondering if anyone had input on coffee storage. I was thinking of sealing ground coffee in Mylar with o2 absorbers but my concern is Will the oils ruin the coffee? Maybe do whole beam instead?
 

Brent S

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Was wondering if anyone had input on coffee storage. I was thinking of sealing ground coffee in Mylar with o2 absorbers but my concern is Will the oils ruin the coffee? Maybe do whole beam instead?
I'd bet that storing the whole bean would be better. I buy five large cans of ground coffee at a time, and probably get 3/4 of a year out of them. I haven't noticed any taste difference with them anyways. I'm sure the O2 absorbers would make it more stable. I also think that where you store it will make more of a difference than how. Cool and dark.
 

mattrow89

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I'd bet that storing the whole bean would be better. I buy five large cans of ground coffee at a time, and probably get 3/4 of a year out of them. I haven't noticed any taste difference with them anyways. I'm sure the O2 absorbers would make it more stable. I also think that where you store it will make more of a difference than how. Cool and dark.
Would probably be stored in the root cellar. Keeps pretty cool down there year round.
 

Brent S

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Would probably be stored in the root cellar. Keeps pretty cool down there year round.
I just got my root cellar sealed up and started loading it with canned goods and stuff. I still haven't put a thermometer in it but it's nice and cool every time I go in it. I hope I stay below 70 in August. We will see!
 

mattrow89

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I just got my root cellar sealed up and started loading it with canned goods and stuff. I still haven't put a thermometer in it but it's nice and cool every time I go in it. I hope I stay below 70 in August. We will see!
I think mine usually stays around 65 during the summer. I'm not 100% sure because I don't check the thermometer as often as I should. It's nice and cool though, lol.
 

psalm 7

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I use Folgers and / or store brand Columbian in my coffee maker . Im working on a pantry full of the stuff we use like coffee , can goods , penut butter , sugar, flour , corn meal , and such . Fill the pantry up and rotate as used . That gives me months of the stuff we use that has a resonable shelf life . For extended coffee storage I keep several jars of instant coffee . In ocasional power outage I have taken out a jar that is several years old and its always been good to use .
 

mattrow89

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far far more antioxidants in pine needle and dandelion tea ;) though I do love my coffee and have stocked up on freeze dried though not my preferred coffee, I love my Folgers Coffee and wish I could stock up for long term storage.
What's in the pine needle and dandelion tea? How exactly do you make it? Just boil the needles and dandelions?
 

Maverick

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Freeze dried (unopened) will last 10 to 15 years, the Folgers I experimented with was 4 years old and was bitter, I left one in it's original sealed container and the other one I sealed in a air tight seal a meal bag, both was bitter, I'm not sure the low oil coffee like Folgers 'simply smooth' would fare any better.
 

Maverick

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What's in the pine needle and dandelion tea? How exactly do you make it? Just boil the needles and dandelions?
Yes boil the pine needles till the water turns a golden brown, add a little sugar or honey and drink, dandelion tea on the other hand depends on what part of the season it is picked, otherwise it is bitter though generally take the leafs and lightly roll them in your palm till you see the leaf turn darker then boil them till the water becomes golden in color add sugar or honey, dandelion tea will also help with upset stomachs, every part of the dandelion can be use for medicinal purposes ;)

Making the tea is an art form learn the old ways.
 

psalm 7

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One thing I have heard about pine needles is if they are round they are safe if they are the flat type they are poison ........... or is it the other way around . I have heard all parts of the dandilion are good for something .
 

Maverick

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One thing I have heard about pine needles is if they are round they are safe if they are the flat type they are poison ........... or is it the other way around . I have heard all parts of the dandilion are good for something .
I make tea from blue spruce, evergreens (not very round ;) ) and of course from short needle/long needle pine trees
 

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I will look that article up . Im sure I still have it in The Backwoodsman or Fur Fish and Game .
 

Gazrok

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Weird. I remember researching this before, and the answers were all over the map. One thing held true, the best recommendation for long term storage remained the instant coffee route (best for time, as long as you don't mind the taste of instant). The sealed bags that are like bricks a close second. For whole coffee beans, they can be stored in burlap bags for up to two years, in a cool, dark place (at least that was the general consensus, which makes sense, as historically, this is how they were kept).

Personally, not a big coffee drinker, but I do keep a bit of both instant and the bricks around. A couple of folks in the house really love their coffee...but neither are snobs about it.
 
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