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LGirl07

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I am a 25 year old who has been prepping for awhile now. I have lots of supplies and live in a trailer park. My parents don't want to listen about prepping and they don't seem concerned that something could happen. My question is if I had to go to a safer building let's say for a hurricane tornado or something like that. I can't carry all my supplies in my car. What do you think I should do about this. Is it a waste because my stuff is at my house? Also since I will be bugging out do I risk leaving it here or taking it with me?
 

jimLE

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as for hurricanes goes,you'll most n like have time to grab whats needed,then head out....but as for tornadoes go. .chances are you'll only have time to get out of there.if at all.so you'll need some place safe to go,within the trailer park,but that's only if you don't have a safe amount of time to get out fast enough... i know most cars don't have one these days.but does your car have a trailer hitch? if so.then you might wanna get a box trailer.and only take whats (REALLY) needed.and i take it,that you have a bol. in which a box trailer will come in handy.
 

Danil54grl

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If you have a BOL I think keeping the majority there would be the best bet. Have enough stuff at your home to last you at least a week. . . whatever the case maybe, you may need to wait a few day to travel. Just never know. Keep a BOB at your home so that you can just grab and go and make sure you have extra in case it takes longer to get to where you are going. I have left for a couple hurricanes years past, mainly cause mom didn't want to stay and she cant drive, but once it past, I came right back home. Jim's idea of a small box trailer is a good idea to have on hand if you plan to be gone for a while. That way you can store some stuff in it like camping supplies and just hitch up when you need to.
 

Gazrok

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You could always bury a cache of supplies. Just be sure the container or contents are watertight. As a FL guy, no stranger to hurricanes. Does your trailer park have any kind of cement block structure? (like a rec center, or office, etc.?) If so, then this would be the logical quick place to go for a tornado. Of course, as in FL, you aren't likely to see any tornadoes above an F2, so your safest bet would be in a bath tub, with a mattress over you (if you don't have time to get to a better structure). Wandering outside is no place to be in a tornado, even a minor one. Just one blown board could be deadly. I know, I've driven through an area with an active tornado before (had to get my brother out of there). Looking back, it was a really dumb thing to do. He was fine where he was. I ended up with damage to my car, but I still feel lucky.

For hurricanes, have a Go Bag that contains the essentials, and bury a cache of other supplies (to be retrieved later, when you CAN carry them off). Again though, having SOMEWHERE to go is of primary importance here. High ground, sound structure, and hopefully friends with a like mindset of prepping would all be best. Even in minor hurricanes, trailer parks are MANDATORY evacuation areas, so you should also check with your family (are they going to a shelter? are they going to a relative's?)

In most cases, you've have at least a day or two notice of an impending hurricane, so this may give you a chance to prep a bit more at whatever location you're going to.

Some basic rules (as a hurricane approaches). (this is my own list, not some canned one)

1. Fill up the car with gas (as much as you can), as gas station pumps may lose power, and be out of order.
2. Get a good deal of cash out of the ATM (same reason as above, power outage means no ATM).
3. Have a weapon (even if just a good knife). Being armed makes less chance of being a victim.
4. Secure any loose articles around your home.
5. Tape or board up your windows.
6. Have a large tarp or two (in case of a roof breach).
7. More for your parents, be sure they have any paperwork they need with them.
8. Take pictures of expensive belongings (for insurance purposes, if they have insurance).
9. Make sure any family photos are in a safe, waterproof container.
10. Take any steps you can if you have pets, to keep them safe.
11. Have some kind of non-electric means to cook food (like a camping stove, or a portable grill).
12. Make sure you have flashlights, LED lanterns, etc. and batteries for them.
13. Make sure you have a radio (for news).
14. Fill tubs, sinks with water (for washing, should have bottled water for drinking).
15. Get bags of ice. Put them in your fridge and freezers (will help keep items cool if power goes).
16. Trim back any branches that are close to the home.

This is all in addition to having other items like spare food, water, medicine, and other preps. The above is really more what you do in those 1 or 2 days prior to the storm arriving. (and I'm sure I'm forgetting a few)
 

jimLE

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gazrok made a good point about flashlights, LED lanterns and batteries for them.i have 2 electric battery chargers.and 1 solar powered battery powered charger.i also have rechargeable batteries for every thing that use's them..i also have a american red cross eton am/fm/whether frequencies radio.in which it has a solar panel/hand crank,and power cord for recharging the batteries in it..
 

Gazrok

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It's a bit more costly, but personally, I recommend every homeowner (or trailer owner) have at least a small, fireproof, waterproof safe to keep important papers in (and cash). That way, even if the unthinkable happens, you'll have what you need to prove what is yours, and get compensation, etc.
 

LGirl07

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as for hurricanes goes,you'll most n like have time to grab whats needed,then head out....but as for tornadoes go. .chances are you'll only have time to get out of there.if at all.so you'll need some place safe to go,within the trailer park,but that's only if you don't have a safe amount of time to get out fast enough... i know most cars don't have one these days.but does your car have a trailer hitch? if so.then you might wanna get a box trailer.and only take whats (REALLY) needed.and i take it,that you have a bol. in which a box trailer will come in handy.
Lol my Toyota Corolla would faint if it had to pull something.
 

jimLE

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i have to agree with that..especially seeing how go-carts aint built for pulling trailers..lol
 

LGirl07

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You could always bury a cache of supplies. Just be sure the container or contents are watertight. As a FL guy, no stranger to hurricanes. Does your trailer park have any kind of cement block structure? (like a rec center, or office, etc.?) If so, then this would be the logical quick place to go for a tornado. Of course, as in FL, you aren't likely to see any tornadoes above an F2, so your safest bet would be in a bath tub, with a mattress over you (if you don't have time to get to a better structure). Wandering outside is no place to be in a tornado, even a minor one. Just one blown board could be deadly. I know, I've driven through an area with an active tornado before (had to get my brother out of there). Looking back, it was a really dumb thing to do. He was fine where he was. I ended up with damage to my car, but I still feel lucky.

For hurricanes, have a Go Bag that contains the essentials, and bury a cache of other supplies (to be retrieved later, when you CAN carry them off). Again though, having SOMEWHERE to go is of primary importance here. High ground, sound structure, and hopefully friends with a like mindset of prepping would all be best. Even in minor hurricanes, trailer parks are MANDATORY evacuation areas, so you should also check with your family (are they going to a shelter? are they going to a relative's?)

In most cases, you've have at least a day or two notice of an impending hurricane, so this may give you a chance to prep a bit more at whatever location you're going to.

Some basic rules (as a hurricane approaches). (this is my own list, not some canned one)

1. Fill up the car with gas (as much as you can), as gas station pumps may lose power, and be out of order.
2. Get a good deal of cash out of the ATM (same reason as above, power outage means no ATM).
3. Have a weapon (even if just a good knife). Being armed makes less chance of being a victim.
4. Secure any loose articles around your home.
5. Tape or board up your windows.
6. Have a large tarp or two (in case of a roof breach).
7. More for your parents, be sure they have any paperwork they need with them.
8. Take pictures of expensive belongings (for insurance purposes, if they have insurance).
9. Make sure any family photos are in a safe, waterproof container.
10. Take any steps you can if you have pets, to keep them safe.
11. Have some kind of non-electric means to cook food (like a camping stove, or a portable grill).
12. Make sure you have flashlights, LED lanterns, etc. and batteries for them.
13. Make sure you have a radio (for news).
14. Fill tubs, sinks with water (for washing, should have bottled water for drinking).
15. Get bags of ice. Put them in your fridge and freezers (will help keep items cool if power goes).
16. Trim back any branches that are close to the home.

This is all in addition to having other items like spare food, water, medicine, and other preps. The above is really more what you do in those 1 or 2 days prior to the storm arriving. (and I'm sure I'm forgetting a few)
In case of a tornado I will try to get to my grandmaws house less than 5 min away survived hurricane Rita ( Katrina's little but still big sister) and sever more. I always keep a get home bag in my car because there is no way I would leave my dog behind. When a storm is getting ready to hit sometimes we stay and sometimes we go. Weatherman said we are do for a big one because Louisiana hasn't been hit very hard in the past couple of years.
 

Gazrok

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Seconding the above. She may even appreciate the help.

If you don't have it already, check into the collapse-able water and food bowls you can get. Perfect for on the go, with the dog. And remember a good leash! (and treats). Good idea to have a little pack with the dog's papers, vaccinations, etc. too. Should you ever need to go to a shelter, those taking pets will require it.
 

eireguy

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You could get one of those roof top strap down carriers . I usually see them at Wally World on clearance towards the beginning of winter . It wouldn't pack a ton of stuff but it would pack more than you can carry now
 

jimLE

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i been thinking about getting one of those for the van,my self..on account.it deffently means carrying more stuff..
 

LGirl07

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Seconding the above. She may even appreciate the help.

If you don't have it already, check into the collapse-able water and food bowls you can get. Perfect for on the go, with the dog. And remember a good leash! (and treats). Good idea to have a little pack with the dog's papers, vaccinations, etc. too. Should you ever need to go to a shelter, those taking pets will require it.
My dog has a BOB he can carry it around
and his leash buckles into the seat belt
 

Gazrok

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Hehe, puttin' the dog to work. I like it! :D
 

LGirl07

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Well I got mine on clearance a while back ago it's reflective but I can always cover it up if I need to go undetected also speaking of dogs did yall know that the dog food storage containers with the screw on kids work so good to keep dog food fresh keeps out critters and water tight the probably see them for human stuff too but pet stores are prob cheaper
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1435287881.306511.jpg
picture down below
 

Gazrok

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Yep, I use the same for my dry cat and dog food, except mine have an angled opening (which makes it a bit easier to access while they are on the shelf). Same material though, and gamma lid. I don't know how we did it without them previously. I want to get more for other storage, but they are so damn pricey. I think the ones I got were like $30 each. That's a lot for a frickin' container. (and I think that was like $10 off the NORMAL price)!
 

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