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Outlawstar

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Requirements:
1. Has high payload and towing capacity
2. Has extended gas tank capacity
3. 4WD with decent ground clearance
4. Can handle 110v AC through builtin inverter
5. Extremely reliable with spare parts available pretty much anywhere there are people
6. Require places to install locking steel "safe" containers

I can get this far. Here's some additional information:

Just sold my 201x Tacoma as the payload wasn't enough for what I might want to carry and due to its size, the truck wasn't ideal to tow larger trailers. What I'm looking for now is a flexible vehicle that can be configured in a variety of ways. Here's an example - maybe while I'm on the road I decide to buy/trade/acquire a camper instead of the 8x10 pull trailer I currently have which uses a 2" ball. There are 3 sizes of trailer ball - so I plan to carry the other two common ball sizes in my vehicle for convenience. That's an example of flexibility.

Questions:
1. Where do I sleep? Slide-in camper? Pull camper? Rooftop tent?
2. Best way to add a refrigerator?
3. What's important to you?

What say you?
Outlawstar
 

Brent S

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I’m thinking in a different direction. I would like an all electric, small suv. Lightweight with solar panels all over the outside. Of course 4wheel drive and 400 miles between charges. I haven’t seen anything like this yet but hope it’s around in five more years or so. I think the stealth of quiet electric and off road would serve me better than being able to carry loads of gear during shtf. Being able to recharge, even if it took a few days using solar seems better than scavenging for fuel.
 

Arcticdude

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I think I'd start out with a late 60's early 70' F250 or F350 Ford factory High Boy, with 4 wheel drive and V8 of course. You can add a couple extra fuel tanks under the bed, and/or you can add a 60-100 gallon tank in the truck bed.
There's advantages and disadvantages of pulling a trailer or having an in bed camper. Years ago my parents had a pop up tent trailer. It was light weight and easy to pull. And you can carry a lot of gear on top of the trailer when it's not set up.
 

Rellgar

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I would suggest a Jeep or other 4x4 vehicle converted to bio diesel. Tow something like this or even build one.

BushRanger 200 XT Off Road Trailer

The BushRanger 200 XT Off Road Trailer by Kakadu Camping is a 4′ x 7′ steel box trailer with an independent axle-less suspension system that gives you a softer ride even while driving off -road. It gives you approximately 200 square feet of living space including the main bed, tent, and awning. The BushRanger 200 XT retails for $8,995.

 

Outlawstar

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I’m thinking in a different direction. I would like an all electric, small suv. Lightweight with solar panels all over the outside. Of course 4wheel drive and 400 miles between charges. I haven’t seen anything like this yet but hope it’s around in five more years or so. I think the stealth of quiet electric and off road would serve me better than being able to carry loads of gear during shtf. Being able to recharge, even if it took a few days using solar seems better than scavenging for fuel.

I love the electric/solar idea, and that goes to show not to be too restrictive with the requirements. Assuming the vehicle has to be gas/diesel powered kills a lot of good ideas right from the start. Bio-Diesel is also a good idea. I love the BushRanger 200 XT. Wow, keep the ideas coming!!!
 

tmttactical

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First it is important to know where you will be bugging out from and where you will bugging to. A cross country trip will require huge tanks or refueling depots. If you are bugging out to a four season climate, then you are not going to want to be camping out in a tent during the snow and ice storms. Are you bugging out to an off grid location or just in a different direction. Lot of very wise and smart folks here, so the more you share, the better they can help you.
 

Arcticdude

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First it is important to know where you will be bugging out from and where you will bugging to. A cross country trip will require huge tanks or refueling depots. If you are bugging out to a four season climate, then you are not going to want to be camping out in a tent during the snow and ice storms. Are you bugging out to an off grid location or just in a different direction. Lot of very wise and smart folks here, so the more you share, the better they can help you.
I wouldn't be too quick to rule out a tent if space is limited. I spent a fair amount of time sleeping in a tent in Antarctica down to about -65f, not too comfortable. I also used a wall tent in cold weather. I had a collapsible wood stove with a water heater. Very comfortable and compact. The wall tent I had was used on pack horses. Another good mode of transportation after SHTF.
 

Outlawstar

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First it is important to know where you will be bugging out from and where you will bugging to. A cross country trip will require huge tanks or refueling depots. If you are bugging out to a four season climate, then you are not going to want to be camping out in a tent during the snow and ice storms. Are you bugging out to an off grid location or just in a different direction. Lot of very wise and smart folks here, so the more you share, the better they can help you.
I've got a few acres of very private and relatively remote land about 2 hours from where I work (big city Southeastern US) that backs up up to USFS land. There are a lot of natural defenses to getting into the area (deep gorges, mountainous terrain, etc.). Even though my property is only 2 hours away under normal circumstances on the highway, I'll need to plan for fording some mountain streams to get there in the event all the major roads are closed. I don't want to bank on GPS working so I have paper maps. The 2 mountain streams that I know I'll need to cross may require finding fords, and they will almost certainly be on private property which might be a problem. I haven't found the fords or checked them out yet either ,although they're rumored to definitely exist. It's hard to tell if the locals are blowing smoke up your bleep but logic says they're correct. Somebody crossed these rivers back in the day before automobiles but then they probably had mules or horses. If/when I find them I'm considering reaching out and trying to negotiate passage in an emergency. That's one of the things that concerns me - the cross-country trip has the potential to be fairly rigorous, and it's a bear to plan. Of course I have lots of other roads/paths but I try to design my plans with lots of contingencies. Plus I'll have a woman along which is my weakest link - but sometimes a tremendous strength as well.
 

Rellgar

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As Arcticdude said, a tent is doable. Build a fire pit with a wooden wind guard and tarps to trap the heat. As long as you have a wood supply and are prepared with a enough tools and materials your good to go.
 

tmttactical

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I wouldn't be too quick to rule out a tent if space is limited. I spent a fair amount of time sleeping in a tent in Antarctica down to about -65f, not too comfortable. I also used a wall tent in cold weather. I had a collapsible wood stove with a water heater. Very comfortable and compact. The wall tent I had was used on pack horses. Another good mode of transportation after SHTF.

As Arcticdude said, a tent is doable. Build a fire pit with a wooden wind guard and tarps to trap the heat. As long as you have a wood supply and are prepared with a enough tools and materials your good to go.

What is wrong with you folks. :eek: Don't you know that the white fluffy stuff requires R-40 minimal insulation. Several stoves, add a duct distribution system, to just barely survive. :D
 

TexasFreedom

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"bug out vehicle"? If/when SHTF, roads are kill-zones. "2 hours" today might be 120 miles. That might as well be 12,000 miles post SHTF. There will be no 'roads'. You would do better to hike back woods, a few miles per day.

If you're going that far, learn to fly a helicopter or small plane. Or live closer. Or a tank? Or pray you can travel before SHTF with forewarning. Here is your forewarning...
 

Outlawstar

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"bug out vehicle"? If/when SHTF, roads are kill-zones. "2 hours" today might be 120 miles. That might as well be 12,000 miles post SHTF. There will be no 'roads'. You would do better to hike back woods, a few miles per day.

If you're going that far, learn to fly a helicopter or small plane. Or live closer. Or a tank? Or pray you can travel before SHTF with forewarning. Here is your forewarning...

I've got the small plane angle covered, but it's only good for getting me and one other to the property with little or no payload which is split between properties. The intent is to be at my location if at all possible, but I travel for work and could easily get caught in the city. It's 108 miles and that definitely does translate to 12,000 miles when SHTF.
 

TexasFreedom

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Keep in mind that flying a small plane in SHTF is like lighting flares. Everyone for 10 miles will see where you landed & come running. Maybe one trip to get there, but going back & forth will be more problem than benefit.
 

grayghost668

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the way I see this,,,nukes nukes and more nukes,,,,so anything that will still run will have to be it
 

JackDW

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First, as usual, this is my opinion only. WARNING, I have been known to be wrong.

In my opinion, I think immediately after a SHTF situation, people will be confused and generally trying to live like they did before. This should give a few days (maybe as long as a week) to get situated. Traveling during this period should not be as bad as it will become in a few weeks. I think those first few days will be the key to getting into position. The hardest part will be recognizing when you are in that zone. Those who react immediately (in the first few days) will have the easiest time. Once things fall apart, any vehicle will be subject to confiscation. For personal use, travel on foot or horse back (mules may be better) away from main roads will your best option. If you need to travel, there is strength in numbers. Have as many people (armed) with you as possible. Me personally, I hope to handle any traveling in the first few days and then hole up as long as I can. The gasoline will not be used in vehicles but to run a generator as long as possible as we adjust to living without power.
 

Brent S

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First, as usual, this is my opinion only. WARNING, I have been known to be wrong.

In my opinion, I think immediately after a SHTF situation, people will be confused and generally trying to live like they did before. This should give a few days (maybe as long as a week) to get situated. Traveling during this period should not be as bad as it will become in a few weeks. I think those first few days will be the key to getting into position. The hardest part will be recognizing when you are in that zone. Those who react immediately (in the first few days) will have the easiest time. Once things fall apart, any vehicle will be subject to confiscation. For personal use, travel on foot or horse back (mules may be better) away from main roads will your best option. If you need to travel, there is strength in numbers. Have as many people (armed) with you as possible. Me personally, I hope to handle any traveling in the first few days and then hole up as long as I can. The gasoline will not be used in vehicles but to run a generator as long as possible as we adjust to living without power.
I agree that there would be a chance to travel at first. Of course the roads may be blocked by debris depending on the disaster. Also, they would likely be littered with cars that run out of gas as the masses try to escape areas. There are no absolutes, and deciding on wether to bug out or stay put would have to be decided on depending on ever changing circumstances. I don’t have any plans to bug out but know that could change in an instant.
 

Kevin L

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I have my own ideas about a bug-out vehicle.
5b56c002a942be3d2909dce1-large.jpg

I plan on using such a converted bicycle for several reasons:
1) Approximately 180 miles per gallon.
2) Extremely cheap and easy to maintain, due to simplicity of parts.
3) Can cannibalize parts off other bicycles.
4) Can go off road.
5) Can be pedaled when and/or if gas runs out....or if complete silence is desirable.
6) Can be pushed or carried through flooding, across blocked roads, around fences, and so on.
7) Can be readily converted back into a normal bicycle.
8) Can be easily concealed.
9) Can be used as a kind of back-up (ie: a "life boat") if your truck breaks down.
10) Is totally immune to EMP from either a nuke or a solar event, as it's entirely mechanical.

I plan to attach a bike trailer (which will--I admit--eat into the milage) like the one below:

321364b8-7d7a-4164-aa8e-9e7fedec7615.jpeg

I know that I may get a lot of static for my arguments, but prepping (for me) as always been about skills, not stuff.

If I'm bugging out, I want mobility.....and the mindset of being high-speed and low drag.

I can carry enough stuff with this approach to last for quite a while on the road.

Even if you guys don't agree with me, at least tell me that you can see my points.
 

Brent S

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I have my own ideas about a bug-out vehicle.
View attachment 9487

I plan on using such a converted bicycle for several reasons:
1) Approximately 180 miles per gallon.
2) Extremely cheap and easy to maintain, due to simplicity of parts.
3) Can cannibalize parts off other bicycles.
4) Can go off road.
5) Can be pedaled when and/or if gas runs out....or if complete silence is desirable.
6) Can be pushed or carried through flooding, across blocked roads, around fences, and so on.
7) Can be readily converted back into a normal bicycle.
8) Can be easily concealed.
9) Can be used as a kind of back-up (ie: a "life boat") if your truck breaks down.
10) Is totally immune to EMP from either a nuke or a solar event, as it's entirely mechanical.

I plan to attach a bike trailer (which will--I admit--eat into the milage) like the one below:

View attachment 9488

I know that I may get a lot of static for my arguments, but prepping (for me) as always been about skills, not stuff.

If I'm bugging out, I want mobility.....and the mindset of being high-speed and low drag.

I can carry enough stuff with this approach to last for quite a while on the road.

Even if you guys don't agree with me, at least tell me that you can see my points.
Honestly I think it’s a great idea. I’ve thought an electric version would be good too with solar panels to recharge it. The main advantage of electric is silence. Neither gas or batteries will last for too long, but I think both are a good idea.
 

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