Healthy Recipes (substitutes for grocery store offerings)

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QuietH3art

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It's no secret here that I'm a pescatarian - that's a vegetarian who eats seafood, eggs and dairy products. I'm not one of those people who thinks "Oh I can't eat the poor cow (or pig) because it's so cute." I MISS a good steak, juicy burger, crispy bacon, ham slices (groan).
My reason for quitting wasn't distaste for the fact of where they originated (on the hoof and alive) but because commercial beef and pork are so loaded with fat, chemicals, hormones, antibiotics and gmos that they were killing me (and everyone else).
I won't eat any commercial corn, products with corn syrup or other corn derivatives in them. I feed my chickens and goats organic feed so they won't get the gmos either.
Every day, I see something new about commercial foods and every day I become more determined to provide for myself.
Here's the latest: http://www.buzzfeed.com/rachelysanders/dark-secrets-how-food-groceries-are-made#3bfyuf9

But then I saw this and it opens up so much potential for variety in my food storage. I thought you would all enjoy some of the recipes offered here: http://www.buzzfeed.com/rachelysanders/foods-to-diy-make-instead-of-buy#3bfyuf9

By the way, I'm going through my food storage to sell all of my store-bought canned goods as soon as I can replace them with the good stuff I make myself.
 

Danil54grl

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Nice. . . I always love the DIY recipes so that I can customize what we grow here at home. It is defiantly the healthier way eat without all the added things you do not want in your diet.
 

QuietH3art

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Nice. . . I always love the DIY recipes so that I can customize what we grow here at home. It is defiantly the healthier way eat without all the added things you do not want in your diet.
One of the big ones for me was the mayo. I love mayo and I've been suffering withdrawals. It's so nice to know I can make my own and know it's healthy now. Now I wish I could find a good home recipe for ranch dressing.
 

QuietH3art

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I found this recipe in my search for ways to include turmeric in my diet. Turmeric has many medicinal qualities, inhibiting inflammation, aids in wound healing and muscle regeneration and it is good for your heart. The main medicinal components in turmeric are antioxidant molecules called curcuminoids. But cooking easily destroys these fragile molecules. So, I wanted to find ways to use it without cooking it.

This vinaigrette is excellent for mixed green salads or cold, steamed broccoli or
cauliflower. It’s especially good with bitter greens such as chicory or radicchio.
Quantities of ingredients are approximate. Vary to suit your taste. MAKES 1/3 CUP

• 3 to 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
• 1 1/2 tablespoons rice vinegar or mild wine vinegar
• 1 to 2 teaspoons lemon juice
• 1 to 3 teaspoons honey
• 1 1/2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
• 1/2 teaspoon turmeric
• 1 clove garlic, mashed
• Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

1. Whisk the ingredients to mix, then pour over the greens and serve. As a
vinaigrette, pour over steamed broccoli or green beans and refrigerate for up to 4
hours before serving.


Read more: http://www.motherearthliving.com/food/turmeric-vinaigrette-
recipe.aspx#ixzz39l4QhgfR
 

QuietH3art

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And here's a delicious substitute for the onion blossom or blooming onion that you can often get at steakhouse restaurants that also contains turmeric:

• 2 large red or yellow onions
• 1 teaspoon minced fresh or dried thyme
• 1/8 teaspoon salt
• 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
• 1 1/2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
• 1 1/2 teaspoons turmeric

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Peel the onions. Cut them into eighths and spread them evenly in a 9-inch square ungreased baking dish. Sprinkle the thyme and salt over the pieces, then drizzle with the oil and vinegar. Cover the dish with foil and bake until tender, about 50 minutes.

2. Remove the onions from the oven. Carefully spoon juices from the bottom of the pan into a small bowl and add the turmeric, mixing well. Drizzle the juice over the onions. Return to the oven and bake, uncovered, for 5 minutes. Serve hot or warm.
 
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