HALO Chest Seal

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Silent Bob

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I know by initial posts have been related more to the Public Health, Pandemic Virus, Solar power, and other venues, so I'd like to switch gears now. I am going to try and do some product reviews of medical items. Today, I am posting a thread on HALO Chest Seals, I know their are many other seals out there, but for me, the HALO Chest Seal is possibly the easiest and under stressful situations like a sucking chest wound. The HALO is by far the best. My dad before he passed away use to trade lesson moments on to me and even at the age of 40, I was receptive to his ways. One of his favorite sayings since he was old Army was takes a war for the military and the contractors to get in right. If your an old Vietnam Vet and did your tours, you will remember in the mid 60's that many savvy soldiers and marines didn't discard their M-14, for the sleek new carbine (M-15) because it had difficulties with just about everything...funny how things come full circle, and a new sleek weapon that is based off the old M-14 is now in the warfighter. Alas, the HALO Chest Seal is one that has not only proven its reliability and ease of use in the modern battlefield, but has become a staple in all my teams IFAK. Not only do I not inspect the IFAK, I make sure that at least semi-annually, our team does a gear check of the IFAK, but knows how to use them. If your familiar with the IFAK, we upgraded the IFAK and keep introducing new material as it enters the market.

So I am a big follower of Warriorhealer22, Doc Pops and Dr. Henley...I typically reread most of their threads, just to refresh my memory since I am no longer working in combat medicine, nor emergency medicine. So to start things off and I agree with Doc Pops that should we have an "Event", AKA to the rest as SHTF or TEOTWAWKI, the possibility of survival of a gunshot wound is very slim. Yes, and if your a combat vet, going to throw the idea of the "Golden Hour" without a true surgeon with MFST capability...slim margin at best, but I'm still going to throw this thread out there...just to keep us focused on preps, at a minimum, the HALO Chest Seal will be a lifesaver if you have an accident on the firing range or in a training accident, many things can cause of sucking chest wound like an automobile accident or even a protrusion injury following a tornado, so keep that in your back of your mind, when reviewing this thread.

Direct Quote from Warriorhealer22: Chest wounds- the ribs do a good job of deflection but open chest wounds need to be treated quickly- this is a breathing issue as well as a circulation issue and may lead to an airway issue. "Sucking chest wounds" occur when the lung is trying to draw air or exhale from the hole. Often entrance wounds will not produce this as the musculature will often act as a seal. it is the exit wounds that will be sucking. It is not wrong to treat any chest wound as a sucking chest wound. Also, remember, anything done in the field will not fix the problem! Surgery will.

Wow, when I saw this thread, summed up my thought and you'll notice I didn't weigh in at all on the thread on Gunshot wounds, because everyone summed it up perfectly.

So here is the




It is very simple to use, it comes with two seals, one front and one rear (exit wound or through and through). Since you'll already be protected make sure not to get your glove fingers on the sticky side, if you do, then part of your nitrile glove will go with it. Clean both the front of the chest and back of the chest (if it is a through and through wound) with 4x4 gauze or just about anything to remove all the blood that is on the surface of the body, pay close attention to the wound site. If you can practice sterile precautions great, but remember time factor. Place the seal on the front chest and then place the rear seal on the back (if an exit wound is visible). Remember to monitor your patient, you may have to release the pressure, in that case you can lift one corner of the front seal to help relieve the pressure (for the novice that is like burping a Ziploc bag that has air in it, same premise, just couldn't explain it any other way...so cut me some slack, medical professionals).

Their is a good video of the HALO Chest Seal, so it saves me from begging my son to edit a video for me.


I am going to try and do a product review every so often, if their is interest in doing so, please be so kind to give me feedback or at least hit that like thing, so at least I know I am helping you all, if not, I don't want to waste your time and focus on something else. My next one post I think will be showing you the improved IFAK that I've built. Just to help those struggling to address a individual first aid kit. Have a great week all!
 

jontte

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found a store that sells those halos for 29 euros,aprox 35 usd, might have to pop in and buy one plus some other stuff aswell
 

Silent Bob

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Jontte,

Good to hear from you. Price is about a little higher retail than U.S. but maybe taking into consideration exchange and import duty. Like I said, their are other companies out there and possibly a European pharmaceutical that may produce a similar one. I had one that was opened when I got it from the medical supplier, they sent a new one, so we use the open one for training purposes. Hence why I gave a warning about the gloves, one of our non-medical types, got their fingers inside the sticky side during training and the rest is history. Note, it will still work though, because we are still using it for training, with the part of the nitrile glove still stuck on.

Also, thanks for feedback on the canteen. I figure most will say canteen, just thought it would be nice to get a discussion on the issue and see where everyone is leaning. Right now, since you and Jim have been the only ones that have chimed in, its a tie, lol!, me, I am the bean counter, so I am obtaining from the vote...have a good one...saw your getting some Scandinavian's joining on the site...who knows you might have to do a meet somewhere there. I am sure if I mentioned that to my son and I paid for a vacation there, he volunteer to go...he's online right now playing some online game with guys from Norway right now as I type.

Take care, good hearing from you.
 

jontte

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Silent Bob,
it's always good to hear from you,hadn't you mentioned that halo,well I wouldn't have known abt it,I found a few other places with the same or similar products,but as they were pharmaceuticals,their price was higher,hey thats finland ;) ,the store I found which had halo has also other supplies,like turniquets etc.
we might have someday a nordic chapter,we have a nice ferry connection between fin-swe and as I plan to visit my mom who lives in sweden,why not meet my prepperfriends if it's ok for them.
what worries me abt that bladder,is that it has to be kept clean,canteen aswell,but canteens are easier.

Take care you to,and watch your 6
 

Silent Bob

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Yes their are others, as for the tourniquet, I'd go for this one...Kwik TK tourney. I attended a Wounded Warrior meeting and met up with some great combat medics from various services to include an 18D, they immediately got me on board really quick. I've got the CAT tourney as a back up, but think that the KWIK T would be very versatile.

As for the bladder, well I am old hat on bladders, have been using them since they first came out, as for cleaning, pretty easy, I use a little dish soap and water, rinse and then take an old wire hangar, soft edges (not sharp end), bend it to fit in, bend it a little out, presto magic, you've got enough air coming from the fill point to dry it out. I wouldn't spend the money on one of those fancy wash kits, just a little wire brush does it for me, mind you, your not putting tea or drink mixes in them. I know some do it, but well judge yourself.

Later.
 

Roninsensei

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Plastic wrap and duct tape has worked for me in these situations but that is a neat product. A little pricy for me but neat none the less...
 

Silent Bob

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Roninsensei your correct in a field expedient manner that is an acceptable procedure. Prior to the release of the Bolin, Asherman and HALO designs, combat medics of all services were taught to use the wounded members military identification card and tape as field expedient manner. I have been away from the military medicine training side for a while, so am not an authority on whether they still teach this field expedient procedure at Ft. Sam Houston (where in late 2000's under a DOD directive, all three military medical services combined their medical training under one umbrella). Thank you for your reply.

Additionally, as I said in the first post, the Bolin and Asherman seals are also used in tx of sucking chest wound. I am going to attach for those in the medical area a Navy Research Study that concludes the both the Bolin and Asherman seals provide good stabilization qualities, but that that the Bolin Chest seal provides better adhesive qualities on wounds. No study has been done on the HALO design by the Navy Research/USHUS, but I believe that the HALO and Bolin offer better field results. Obviously, this data also correlates to what most combat medics would reflect on their reports from combat casualties treated in Afghanistan and Iraq. I have spoken to a few law enforcement friends who indicate their tactical teams have begun to convert to the HALO in their on-scene med kit. I'm waiting to discuss this issue with Westcoast, since he serves in a SWAT team, but he's been offline the last couple of days.

Regards,
 

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Warriorhealer22

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Hey, thanks for the compliment! Anyway, one thing I want to point out on any of these chest seals they make- it is very important to clean the area for the adhesive to stick! This is often looked over- that is the purpose for included gauze, and is a prime reason for these items to shift. I've seen it too often to count. In the back of my helicopter racing to the hospital I usually just end up taping the seal back over the wound with 3inch medical tape. Also its best to apply them after the patient exhales.
 

Silent Bob

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Hey, thanks for the compliment! Anyway, one thing I want to point out on any of these chest seals they make- it is very important to clean the area for the adhesive to stick! This is often looked over- that is the purpose for included gauze, and is a prime reason for these items to shift. I've seen it too often to count. In the back of my helicopter racing to the hospital I usually just end up taping the seal back over the wound with 3inch medical tape. Also its best to apply them after the patient exhales.

Actually, I typically read and reread your posts and the others who have the background. Really your comments are similar to the same thoughts I have in a real event. My military career was eventful, after retiring, I did the work in both federal/state Public Health/EM response and training. Great job, just a ton of time away from the family. Did a stint with Red Cross and then got recruited back into medical, to be the nurse manager/surgery assistant. After my physician moved to California, I just didn't see myself working for a new physician. My old boss offered to move me out to California, and pay me really well, but family was secure here and wife has a great job. One of those Ahh moments, so went a total direction. So now have a new mission, but do miss Public Health, clinical and emergency medicine.

I've got two nurses and am EMT who works for AMR that make up the true medical portion of our team. I don't include myself in that group, but participate in planning, exercises and training. We've got a doctor who has indicated he wants to join, but as yet, hasn't made any meetings. We had two Air Force folks but because of reassignment overseas, they are no longer part of our group. The one nurse is a careflight nurse, covers pretty much the entire area that runs to Gutherie Texas, North to the Red River, and South East to about Bowie, Texas. We typically have a separate round table that meets apart from the rest of the team meetings to discuss medical issues, new equipment, new procedures and any field expedient treatments that migh be useful in an event. Once a year, we run a table top, not much of an exercise, last only about an hour, from that discussion, we bring in the rest of the team and oreint them to how we would do an event, example mass casualty, break down who would be the first responders (since that won't be happening after an event), who triages, who is back really doing the medical. Quarterly, we do a bag drag and also do some inservices on wound management, airway management, etc to the entire team. Typically, since the fire teams will be the ones in the field, we've identified them to be first responders. We cross train them, all have completed the Red Cross first aid/CPR/AED course, some have completed the old military self-aid buddy care courses and one our Marines has attended an Wilderness EMT course. Since none of us are certified EMT instructors in the state of Texas, we typically encourage our group to attend one on their own time, however, but because of time commitment, haven't been succcessful in checking that off, our needs list. One day, we might be able to attract one, who knows, crossing our fingers.

Glad you addressed the cleaning, I tried by stating using the 4x4's, I didn't want to put out the field expedient stuff. But your so correct on making sure it is cleaned off real well, blood and fluids really do mess up the seal. Yes, and after rereading, thought I put out to exhalion step but missed it. Thanks for adding that to the discussion.

Would enjoy very much having further discussions with you. Who knows maybe you would consider having a online discussion with you, Dr. Henley, and Doc Pops as moderators...well just an idea.

Kind regards,
 

Snowflake

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Good post Bob, I don't know a lot about gun shot wounds and how to treat them so thx for info, Will add to my to buy list.
 

DrHenley

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Who knows maybe you would consider having a online discussion with you, Dr. Henley, and Doc Pops as moderators...well just an idea.
Thanks for the vote of confidence Silent Bob, but I should make it clear that I'm not that kind of doctor. My field was Biomedical Engineering, specifically enzyme deactivation kinetics. LOL That field is so obscure, I'm one of only a handful of people that even knows what it means.

Google "henley enzyme deactivation" and it will look like Ajit Sadana and I were some kind of famous research team :rolleyes:.
 
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