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Brent S

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I have loads of wild blackberries here but the store bought thornless ones produce berries that are 4 times bigger and much sweeter. I started with 6 or 7 plants and now have dozens. Each season the vines branch out and droop down to touch the ground and make more plants. I know one thing for sure, the thornless are a lot less painful to pick!
 

DirtDiva

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I have loads of wild blackberries here but the store bought thornless ones produce berries that are 4 times bigger and much sweeter. I started with 6 or 7 plants and now have dozens. Each season the vines branch out and droop down to touch the ground and make more plants. I know one thing for sure, the thornless are a lot less painful to pick!
Amen to that Brent!
 

DirtDiva

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For those of you with orchards this may help:

Currants and gooseberries. These bear on 1- and 2-year-old wood. Four-year-old and older wood produces poor berries and should be removed. Clean up bushes by removing the oldest shoots in winter, thinning out the new growth, and cutting out dead wood. If berries are very small one year, thin the following winter.

Elderberry bear fruit on the tips of one-year-old shoots and the canes of two and three-year-old wood. Canes older than three years are less productive and should be thinned out.

Blueberries with the potential to grow to heights of 4 to 8 feet, blueberry bushes require regular pruning. However, pruning can also be a cause of a blueberry bush not producing. Berries only form on wood that is 1 year old. Therefore, if you overprune a blueberry bush by removing all the 1-year-old wood, very few berries will be produced until the following year. Instead of pruning new wood, prune away the older stems which are between 4 and 6 years old.

Once reaching this age, these stems will no longer produce the new wood on which berries grow. Prune from the base near the ground, allowing new canes to grow from the roots. Also, avoid pruning away the tips of 1-year-old wood. This is where the fruit buds are formed; if removed, no blueberries will grow until the following year.
 
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