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survivalist

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So I'm on a 3.5 hour drive the other day and I started thinking.....when your bugging out or especially bugging in.....What do you do with your garbage?? If your staying home and trying to remain out of sight...you cant have a bag of garbage outside your home? That would be a dead giveaway. I guess you could utilize most of it somehow like bait, water catchers ect. I dont know what made me think of that but I guess it's food for thought, since I am sure there wont be bi-weekly pick up. Lol
 

Colt 1911

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So I'm on a 3.5 hour drive the other day and I started thinking.....when your bugging out or especially bugging in.....What do you do with your garbage?? If your staying home and trying to remain out of sight...you cant have a bag of garbage outside your home? That would be a dead giveaway. I guess you could utilize most of it somehow like bait, water catchers ect. I dont know what made me think of that but I guess it's food for thought, since I am sure there wont be bi-weekly pick up. Lol
That's a good topic, I guess I would compost all food waste and whatever I could, " good for the garden." The rest I would burn in small batches in a Dakota fire pit late at night. Maybe every 3 or 4 days just to mix it up.

Dakota Fire Pit





A little known survival aid related to wilderness fire making skills is the Dakota Fire Hole, also known as the Dakota Fire Pit. This handy device is easy to construct and has marked advantages over other types of camp fire constructs. Once you make a Dakota fire hole and try it out, you may choose to use this method on a regular basis.
Making a Dakota Fire Hole is initially more labor intensive than simply building a fire on the surface of the ground. However the outlay in energy required to make a Dakota fire hole is more than offset by its efficient consumption of fuel; it greatly reduces the amount of firewood required to cook meals, treat water to destroy pathogens, or warm your body.
The Dakota fire hole is a valuable wilderness survival aid because it burns fuel more efficiently, producing hotter fires with less wood. In many areas firewood is scarce or requires a large amount of time and expenditure of energy in foraging to obtain it. Once you build a fire, efforts are better spent attending to your other wilderness survival needs rather than in the constant gathering of firewood

Other advantages of the Dakota fire hole are that it creates a kind of woodstove with a stable platform that is very convenient to cook over.

Should you need to conceal your fire, the fire hole will limit the amount of visible smoke that rises from the fire, since the fuel wood is burning hotter and more efficiently. The pit will also help conceal the light emitted from your fire, especially at night when even a single candle flame can be seen from miles away.

www.survivaltips.com
 

survivalist

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Thanks Colt!! Thats a pretty bas ### pit. I do wonder what holds up that one section of earth though in between the pit and wind funnel??
 

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Cool! Thanks for the info and the thread!
I must admit I hadn't thought about what do with the garbage either.
 

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So I'm on a 3.5 hour drive the other day and I started thinking.....when your bugging out or especially bugging in.....What do you do with your garbage?? If your staying home and trying to remain out of sight...you cant have a bag of garbage outside your home? That would be a dead giveaway. I guess you could utilize most of it somehow like bait, water catchers ect. I dont know what made me think of that but I guess it's food for thought, since I am sure there wont be bi-weekly pick up. Lol
I agree with colt. I would have small burns so as not to put off too much smoke, or burn your house down. Of course not all houses come with a fire place these days.
I would try to reuse what I could....
 

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night burning is the best way to hide smoke if not using a water smoke filter
True!
Thankfully should I stay put I do have access to a fireplace in the house.
However, in the early 90's late 80' as Vegas, NV banned wood burning fireplaces from being placed in newly constructed homes according to a real estate agent I knew when I lived up there.
 
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True!
Thankfully should I stay put I do have access to a fireplace in the house.
However, in the early 90's late 80' as Vegas, NV banned wood burning fireplaces from being placed in newly constructed homes according to a real estate agent I knew when I lived up there.

That is one of the things I tell my trainies when able to get online and for $200 you can buy a wood burning cookstove with flue
 

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cilynder stoves are great a bit pricey but rural king or farm and fleet has great wood stoves for and flue pipes for around $200
Of course I will have to learn some construction to put it in. Shouldn't be too overly difficult. If I can repair the garage wall my father-in-law drove through then a fire place shouldn't be a problem.
 

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I think ?? or should say, the stoves should be able to connect to fire place flue. fill in the empty area between stove and fire place with bricks and you should be good to go. Way more efficient. I have a old house with two fire places and that's what i would like to do.
 
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I think ?? or should say, the stoves should be able to connect to fire place flue. fill in the empty area between stove and fire place with bricks and you should be good to go. Way more efficient. I have a old house with two fire places and that's what i would like to do.

yes the flue of the ones im talking about are same as standard firplaces simple and easy i will post pics in few mins
 

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