Commonly found heirloom varieties of vegetables

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old_anorak

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Alrighty, so we all know that when the shtf or owebama takes the rest of our money we're going to need to grow our own food. The best way we can do this and continue to due this year after year is to grow the old timey heirlooms. You don't generally find heirloom produce in the supermarkets because they don't lend themselves to factory farming, in other words, they actually taste good.

You don't need to break the bank or order on line to get these seeds. In fact, unless you are looking for specialty items, most of them can be picked up at the Wal Mart. I'm going to list the specific varieties that you will want to look for in each type of fruit and vegetable.

Artichoke
Green Globe

Beans, for drying
Swedish Brown
Vermont Cranberry

Bush Bean, Snap (green beans)
Blue Lake

Beans, Pole (green beans)
Kentucky Wonder

Beets
Chioggia
Detroit Dark Red

Broccoli
Waltham

Brussel Sprouts
Long Island Improved

Cabbage
Early Jersey Wakefield

Carrots
Chantenay
Danvers Half Long

Cucumber
Straight Eight
National Pickle

Eggplant
Black Beauty

Leaf Lettuce
Black Seeded Simpson
Oakleaf

Melons
Hale's

Okra
Clemson Spineless
Red Burgundy

Onions
Red or White Sweet Spanish

Parsnip
Hollow Crown

Garden Pea
Little Marvel
Wando

Snap Pea
Mammoth Melting Sugar
Sugar Snap

Hot Peppers
Anaheim Chili
Ancho Grande
Jalapeno
Serrano

Sweet Peppers
California Wonder

Radish
Crimson Giant
Early Scarlet Globe
White Icicle

Rutabaga
American Purple Top

Summer Squash
Early Summer Crookneck
Zucchini- Black Beauty

Winter Squash
Big Max
Burgess Buttercup
Green Striped Cushaw
Spaghetti Squash

Turnip
Purple Top White Globe

Watermelon
Moon and Stars

I didn't put any tomatoes on the list. There are tons of tomatoes that you can start from seed and I will list some of them tomorrow. It is well worth ordering a packet or two of them off line for the variety. Roma tomatoes are heirloom for the most part and those are the bulk of what I grow, they are a great canning tomato. I don't buy seedlings, I start all of my own in the house from seeds that way I'm not bringing in some unknown something from somewhere else to my gardens.

I hope this helps someone. If anyone has questions, please ask. Danil54grl is a font of knowledge, as is Mastercajun and a few others on here. Once you have veggies coming out of your ears, we'll help you get them stored properly so that you can enjoy them when the snow flies.
 

Kenny Lee

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All that stuff sounds delicious, can't wait to get me some heirloom seeds and plant a small plot.
 

old_anorak

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There is a wild range of freaky heirloom vegetables and fruits out there, some of which probably should have been left under whatever rock whichever stoned hippy found them under, just my opinion though. I don't know if you like melons, but there is a whole world of delicate tasting melons that will never see the light of a supermarket and usually not even the farmer's market due to how fragile they are. The tomatoes are wide ranging as well. The Black Cherokee tomato is a very good tasting one to have in your garden.
 

jayjay

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Thanks for the list - I have a small garden and love keeping seeds for the following year - will try out some from your list.
 

Kenny Lee

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Yes, I Saveur, a magazine on cooking and food and they had an issue on watermelon, and it had so many varieties of heirloom but I couldn't find any of them around me in NYC. Charleston Gray, Stars and Moon are just a few that I remember. I still have the magazine and plan on hunting them down one day. I love watermelon. I hope to grow some New Hampshire Golden Midgets when I get land.
 

old_anorak

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JayJay, at the end of this year's growing season, remind me and I'll send you some of the seed from my garden if you like. Same offer for you as well Kenny.
 

jimLE

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i just printed that list of seeds..now to use one of the app's on my nook to add that list of seeds to it.that way i'll have the list with me when i go to town no matter what,seeing how i always have my nook with me when i go to town
 

ChancesR

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I would like to know if you know of a source of info where they have heirloom seeds by zone.... and other seeds like tea and tobacco or something by zone... I would like to know which ones to consider growing and which ones will not do so well?
 

jimLE

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what i did was.i payed attion to what other folks grow in my area.i also payed attion to what did good and not good for them.then i started looking for heirloom seeds to buy and in hope they do good for me..and here's what i went with for me..

golden bantam corn,national pickling cucumber,emerald okraearly summer crookneck squash,tendersweet carrot,rutgers tomato,Black Eyed Pea,Lincoln Shell Sweet Pea ,Habenero Hot Pepper..the peppers will be strickly for pepper spray
 

jimLE

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here's what i came across.in which i'll go with as is when what it says.but as for useing it to stop a attacker.i wont go with what says at the bottom.To use, measure 1/4 cup of the mixture and transfer to a clean spray bottle. Add about 5 cups of water and shake well to combine.on acount i want to stopp attackers,not give um a free shower.lol

Ingredients and Equipment
The two primary ingredients used to make hot pepper spray are garlic and cayenne pepper. You'll need two medium sized bulbs of garlic and four large cayenne peppers, either fresh or dried. Mineral oil, hot water and natural liquid soap are also required. Mineral oil can be found in your local drug store or hardware store, and natural liquid soap can be found in natural health stores. Dr. Bronner's Castile Soap is one such brand, but any type available may be used.
You'll also need some common
kitchen equipment, including a blender, cheesecloth, rubber gloves, a pint-sized canning jar with lid for storage and a spray bottle for application. It's best to use a blender that will not be used for food preparation. However, if you don't have a spare blender, make sure to wash thoroughly to remove any mineral oil residue before using again. If cheesecloth is not available, you can use nylon pantyhose to strain the liquid.
Making Hot Pepper Spray
Coarsely chop the four garlic cloves, leaving the peel intact. Place them in a blender with the cayenne peppers. Add 2 tbsp. of mineral oil, 2 cups hot water and 3 tsp. of natural liquid soap. Place the lid on the blender and process on high speed for two to three minutes, or until pureed. Allow the hot pepper spray mixture to stand overnight, which will increase the heat and effectiveness of the solution.
In the morning, put on a pair of rubber gloves to protect your hands. This mixture can irritate the skin, so be careful while handling. Strain the liquid through a piece of cheesecloth (or nylon pantyhose) into a glass pint-sized canning jar. Secure the lid tightly and store in a cool, dry place for up to 90 days.

Using Hot Pepper Spray
To use, measure 1/4 cup of the mixture and transfer to a clean spray bottle. Add about 5 cups of water and shake well to combine. Spray directly onto plants as necessary, being careful not to get any of the liquid on your skin. It's a good idea to wear gloves any time you are handling the hot pepper spray. You can make a larger batch to use in a garden sprayer for larger pest problems. Just stick to the formula above of 1/4 cup of solution to every five cups of water.
 

jimLE

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that recipe is for useage on plants in the garden n all..the change i plan on makeing for pepper spray to ward off attackers is this.

Habenero Hot Pepper garlic bulb and lemon juice..
i'll chop up put Habenero Hot Pepper and garlic bulb and put it into the jar i'll be keeping it in after get it made untill jar id some where around 3/4 full.then fill on up lemon juice untill its a safe distance from top of the jar.then dump it all into our ninja professional 1000watt juicer and run it for 4 to 6 seconds.then shut it down to have a look at.if its done up right.i'll leave it of night.then pour it into the jar next day and put the lid on it...
 

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