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Brent S

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Dogs are all individuals with different personalities. I always believe in reward training over the stick thing, but sometimes the stick is needed. Especially when the behaviors dangerous to either itself or others. Chasing cars is something that’s likely to get it killed so needs to be discouraged quickly. Most dogs want to please the alpha in the family and shaming for bad behavior is enough. Some just need more encouragement from something like a shock collar.
 

robinjopo

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Robin we have 2 large outside dogs that belong to my husband. When they were young pups they started developing the habit of chasing cars, atv's etc.
We ended up having to buy shock collars to break them. They worked great and once we got their attention the vibrator option was all it took to correct the habit. Every now and then they have to have a refresher course but the collars ended up being a good solution to hard headed dogs used correctly and responsibly.
Thanks. I hate the thought of using the shock mode. It got my attention when I zapped myself.
 

MNwr786

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I know a couple dog owners that use them. It comes down to common sense. Some people crank them to 100 and use them for every little thing a dog does wrong. If they are used sparingly and with advanced warning, they learn. After a few times, all it takes is picking up the remote and the dog will tune into reality.

We were given a pair of old ones, got them fixed. Both were "altered". One had its HV transformer removed and the contacts replaced with brass posts with knurled nuts for attaching squibs and igniters. I use it for setting off small fireworks. The other one had its contacts replaced with tens pads that were glued to the inside of a wide leather bdsm collar. That one got tested once and has been put away ever since. It's not as fun as we imagined it would be lol
 

robinjopo

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My shower has a 3 handle type faucet hot/cold/shower to tub. They dont make those anymore. Finally found one at Home Depot. Cheap, ugly, but it fits. My shower is tile so i either had to replace the tiles or go with the cheap/ugly.
Okay, plumber gets here and we open the box and the fixtures are chrome covered plastic. It looks like real chrome, but dang, I'm sure they will break in a year because my son and husband are rough on stuff. They also had to take extra chunk out of outer wall. I have an existing access point, but it wasn't large enough to get as high as he needed. Now I have to buy a larger cover and it's going to look like crap. I would like something rather wrought ironish, but can't find it or now probably afford it.
 

EastenerWesterner

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Any idiot that doesn't know what he's doing can ruin a good dog, with or without a training collar.
I have seen Pro’s ruin a good dog. Got 2 with 2 and 3 master passes each.

The one with 3, a red (techinally a dark yellow) didn’t get burned too much by the 1st trainer. He’s got the better temperament and is worth putting the money into. He will go back to get titled next year.

The one with 2 is what the trainer called a Lamborghini, not a Chevy. Yes I can hunt ducks with him. But he may tip over the boat in anticipation. He is a Quack addict.
He got burned 1 time too many by the pro. Didn’t want to play the game anymore. In the past year and a half I have treated him like the rescue abused boxer, I may title him myself. He is only a 4 on my collar when he is crazy. Once a day is a all he needs
 

M0del_31

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When we lived in town, we had to put a bark collar on a golden retriever. She didn’t learn and just ran the battery down. She taught our Texas Heeler to fetch and the heeler taught her to be afraid of thunder. Though long gone the heeler managed to teach the new corgi to fear thunder and fireworks. None of them would dig for gold
 

EastenerWesterner

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When we lived in town, we had to put a bark collar on a golden retriever. She didn’t learn and just ran the battery down. She taught our Texas Heeler to fetch and the heeler taught her to be afraid of thunder. Though long gone the heeler managed to teach the new corgi to fear thunder and fireworks. None of them would dig for gold
My boxer won’t bark incessantly. She gets in a stubborn streak, I put a nonbatteried bark collar on. She is the perfect dog, looking at me like what did I do? She is collar smart.
The 3 labs bark their fool heads off. Kinda dangerous for the 14yr old with breathing problems. A tone is usually sufficient. 2 tones maybe. 3rd time isn’t a tone. A 4 for 1 and a 3 for the other. I don’t zap the old lady.
 

GaRp58

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Funny, I grew up with a Border Collie and four Irish Setters and we never had a barking problem in Texas. Never had a shock collar or even needed one. Our 3 dogs in Germany and now in Hungary over the last 20 or so years have only barked when someone is at the door and shut up quickly after we have let them in only kinda growling under their breath till they realise nobody wants to hurt Helena...none of them ever barked at me when I came home, opened the door or front gate. Pici will bark and go crazy if I send her out into the garden to look for strange cats or tell her to "go get the gypsy!!" The gypsy neighbor thinks that is hilarious too....
 

LexiRae

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I don’t think any dogs need a shock collar to be trained. There are lots of different methods that work great but I think it comes down to an owner’s ability to put in the time and remain consistent. I love dogs too much to shock them😅
EA126B1B-1D8E-4B16-8B1C-206F05A26C09.jpeg
 

Brent S

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My dog had imprinted too much on me and my wife was scared of him. I started having her feed him and now he has warmed up to her a lot. Most behaviors can be corrected easily with some common sense. And I always feel reward and praise is a better way than punishment. Shaming is much better than anger too when needed. The only time I think a shock collar is needed is when the behaviors are dangerous for either the dog or others. Like running in the road, biting or aggressiveness, etc.
 

MNwr786

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I don’t think any dogs need a shock collar to be trained. There are lots of different methods that work great but I think it comes down to an owner’s ability to put in the time and remain consistent. I love dogs too much to shock them😅
Yes, in many cases, if you have the time and patience, but not all. Consider living in the middle of nowhere and your dog is less than a year old. Dog sees a deer or a mountain lion. There is no amount of yelling "come" that will stop him. Have fun finding your dog! Shocking is not inhumane at the levels used by responsible trainers. It is merely unenjoyable. They even started using conductive silicone contacts so they don't dig into the dogs neck.

I was fortunate enough to spend some time with real dog trainers. Those people NEVER used shock collars, never used the word no, never even gently hit them in the ### or nose, never yanked on their leash, never yelled at them at all. They used a clicker and treats, training with sound associations and rewards, and those dogs could smell if you had acetone on you (diabetic), they could smell cancers, they could go get the phone in an emergency, climb ladders, open and close doors, pick up and hand you any object and even seek out and return with help. But being a small part of that, I also learned that SOME dogs were considered untrainable. No matter what was tried, they would not stay focused and the slightest distraction could leave a client with said "assistance" dog seriously hurt. This highly moral and professional dog training company (that would never consider shocking a dog) was putting them to sleep left and right for lack of trainability and home. Where do you stand there? Is death better than a shock? Not every dog is trainable. You see how those dogs are walking you in that picture instead of keeping loose leashes? That would be a program failure within a couple months. So before get all judgemental over a tiny occasional attention-getting zap that is used within reason and responsibility, I want you to consider the alternatives.
 

LexiRae

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wow. a bit rude of a response but okay. I wasn’t trying to be judgemental. I was passing the time as I sit in the ER with my son by giving my opinion. Thought that’s what forums were for. The photo was giving an example of my love for dogs, not exemplary training. Lol. Starting to remember now why I read but rarely comment on y’all’s posts anymore.
 

GaRp58

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After we adopted PICI at the age of three months, got her shots, chip and passport for international travel, we took her for a walk around the lake nearby. After only being part of the family for 4 hours(!!) we took the leash off and she has never since needed a leash to stay with us. She never gets more than about fifty feet away and is constantly looking over her shoulder to see where we are because if she gets any further, we hide behind a tree and leave her "alone" and she comes running back fast...I speak english, Helena, hungarian and the kids use german with her and she understands it all even tho many of the words and commands do not "rhyme" and have the same so-called "sing-song" sound that many people claim dogs understand.
 

MNwr786

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Starting to remember now why I read but rarely comment on y’all’s posts anymore.
I wasn't attacking you, trying to be rude, or using your picture as a gauge of your own training skills. I was merely using it as an example to illustrate a situation. However, when you make a comment like it coming down to a matter of the "owner's ability", we should all feel attacked by you (by your own logic) as you are suggesting anyone here that uses collars are bad trainers. See, I can take things out of context too :) Remember, you interjected with your opinion on the matter, I was merely pointing out how your way of thinking might not always apply. I am going to tap out before you take up a collection to buy me sensitivity training.
 

LexiRae

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After we adopted PICI at the age of three months, got her shots, chip and passport for international travel, we took her for a walk around the lake nearby. After only being part of the family for 4 hours(!!) we took the leash off and she has never since needed a leash to stay with us. She never gets more than about fifty feet away and is constantly looking over her shoulder to see where we are because if she gets any further, we hide behind a tree and leave her "alone" and she comes running back fast...I speak english, Helena, hungarian and the kids use german with her and she understands it all even tho many of the words and commands do not "rhyme" and have the same so-called "sing-song" sound that many people claim dogs understand.
That’s awesome Gary! I can take Ollie without a leash and he won’t chase a squirrel but it still gives me anxiety. Lol. And I have always wondered how dogs really feel about the “sing song” voices.😂
 

Brent S

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wow. a bit rude of a response but okay. I wasn’t trying to be judgemental. I was passing the time as I sit in the ER with my son by giving my opinion. Thought that’s what forums were for. The photo was giving an example of my love for dogs, not exemplary training. Lol. Starting to remember now why I read but rarely comment on y’all’s posts anymore.
Yeah I believed forums were for discussing different viewpoints as well. I quickly learned how many people are intolerant and incapable of any idea outside of their own reality. Especially when it’s religious or political….
 

robinjopo

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After we adopted PICI at the age of three months, got her shots, chip and passport for international travel, we took her for a walk around the lake nearby. After only being part of the family for 4 hours(!!) we took the leash off and she has never since needed a leash to stay with us. She never gets more than about fifty feet away and is constantly looking over her shoulder to see where we are because if she gets any further, we hide behind a tree and leave her "alone" and she comes running back fast...I speak english, Helena, hungarian and the kids use german with her and she understands it all even tho many of the words and commands do not "rhyme" and have the same so-called "sing-song" sound that many people claim dogs understand.
Rub it in Gary.
 

EastenerWesterner

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A horse trainer once told my wife, if you are not training, you are untraining . This holds true. The ponies have basically reverted to being wild again. I have to go a couple of days ahead of the farrier with carrots to get them haltered .

My dogs, except for vet visits, haven’t been on leash in 3 years. They will pull like the dogs in the picture. I have untrained them by not having them on leash. I have the boxer that has to be restrained because of medication that is fighting me on it right now

I got the boxer as a rescue, because animal control brought it in. They told my wife’s clinic to do everything. The guy was dragging it down the street on a bicycle then got off and punched it in front of a canine cop. The guy spent Labor Day weekend in jail, had to pay over $3000 and had to relinquish the dog.

I spent 2 months building trust with the 4 month old pup. To this day, that dog will get her haunches up and growl when she sees a large Black or Hispanic man. I took her to a training class using the Koehler method (he was the head trainer for Disney).

Almost all training methods use a type of control. Choke chain, properly installed. The instructors at the 10 week class told me I would never be able to train her. Every single week.

I worked with that dog, an hour a day, down at the local park with distractions like bums sleeping. Squirrels were her downfall. The throw chains prescribed in week 8or9 was when I had enough. She was still small enough to squeeze through our gate on a very busy street.

Using an Ecollar was a lifesaver for her. I could tell her sit, stay, walk 200 yards up the driveway, then here. So much for an untrainable boxer.

My labs, professionally trained, will respond to a whistle and hand signals to do a blind retrieve.

To keep up with this level of training, you have to keep reinforcing it.
 

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