Camphobacter

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Maverick

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So it looks to be more so tied to animals living in close proximity of one another such as coops, barns and stockyards?

Almost like beaver fever!

"The common routes of transmission for the disease-causing bacteria are fecal-oral, person-to-person sexual contact, ingestion of contaminated food (generally unpasteurized (raw) milk and undercooked or poorly handled poultry), and waterborne (i.e., through contaminated drinking water). Contact with contaminated poultry, livestock, or household pets, especially puppies, can also cause disease.

Animals farmed for meat are the main source of campylobacteriosis. A study published in PLoS Genetics (September 26, 2008) by researchers from Lancashire, England, and Chicago, Illinoise, found that 97 percent of campylobacteriosis cases sampled in Lancashire were caused by bacteria typically found in chicken and livestock. In 57 percent of cases, the bacteria could be traced to chicken, and in 35 percent to cattle. Wild animal and environmental sources were accountable for just three percent of disease"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campylobacteriosis
 

Silent Bob

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So it looks to be more so tied to animals living in close proximity of one another such as coops, barns and stockyards?

Almost like beaver fever!

"The common routes of transmission for the disease-causing bacteria are fecal-oral, person-to-person sexual contact, ingestion of contaminated food (generally unpasteurized (raw) milk and undercooked or poorly handled poultry), and waterborne (i.e., through contaminated drinking water). Contact with contaminated poultry, livestock, or household pets, especially puppies, can also cause disease.

Animals farmed for meat are the main source of campylobacteriosis. A study published in PLoS Genetics (September 26, 2008) by researchers from Lancashire, England, and Chicago, Illinoise, found that 97 percent of campylobacteriosis cases sampled in Lancashire were caused by bacteria typically found in chicken and livestock. In 57 percent of cases, the bacteria could be traced to chicken, and in 35 percent to cattle. Wild animal and environmental sources were accountable for just three percent of disease"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campylobacteriosis

Yup, its funny, when you wrote beaver fever earlier this year in another post, I had to laugh because my old veterinary officer in the Air Force, use to call campylobacter as "Beaver Fever"...of course, he was a very odd sort of the old Vietnam veterinary officer....he'd take me out to calving season and when we did large animal visits to the horse stable....we'd treat all sorts of stuff. Since I didn't mind getting my hands dirty, I always volunteered, which paid big dividends when I went to Africa and Asia, since I was one of the few existing combat medics with veterinary training. You'd be amazed at what stuff I treated in Africa and Asia, stuff we just don't see in the good ole USA because of the FDA and USDA regulatory folks. So the stuff really went hand and hand with the virology/epidemiology work I did in the field, not to mention treating the typical ring worm, heat rash, crushed bones, blisters that I'd see on a normal deployment. That stuff really made my end of tour deployment report much more fun to write and was always several hundred pages longer than the rest of the medics and docs write-ups. Also it ensured that I had a vehicle at my disposal as I was always finding some sorta of trouble to get into. Sure made long days, but then you didn't get home sick, nor counting the number of days in country...which was what everyone else was doing. I had to tailor back my outings in Afghanistan and Iraq as the natives were a bit more restless then they were in Africa and Asia. So I saw tonight's post, it brought some good memories of some of my better (non shooting) deployments.
 

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