California races to get ahead of another bad fire season

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Jayson

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Well, Caitlyn Jenner just came out for ending California's illegal alien sanctuary state status and finishing the Wall, so I guess she will be the one to deal with fires also.
He/she/it just makes me sick to my stomach. What a freak!o_O
 

Helen Back

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Water crisis ‘couldn’t be worse’ on Oregon-California border (msn.com)

Water crisis ‘couldn’t be worse’ on Oregon-California border

" The water crisis along the California-Oregon border went from dire to catastrophic this week as federal regulators shut off irrigation water to farmers from a critical reservoir and said they would not send extra water to dying salmon downstream or to a half-dozen wildlife refuges that harbor millions of migrating birds each year. In what is shaping up to be the worst water crisis in generations, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation said it will not release water this season into the main canal that feeds the bulk of the massive Klamath Reclamation Project, marking a first for the 114-year-old irrigation system. The agency announced last month that hundreds of irrigators would get dramatically less water than usual, but a worsening drought picture means water will be completely shut off instead. "
 

Jayson

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We just took a trip through Utah and Nevada. They are being hit very hard by the extended drought. Folks, I’m no meteorologist, but I think we’re in for a long dry spell, no pun intended.
 

Arcticdude

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We just took a trip through Utah and Nevada. They are being hit very hard by the extended drought. Folks, I’m no meteorologist, but I think we’re in for a long dry spell, no pun intended.
Utah, Nevada, much of California, eastern Oregon, southern Idaho and much of Wyoming are deserts. By definition they are in perpetual drought. The only thing that is important in these areas is the mountain snow pack, that is where all the water comes from in most of the west. A heavy snow pack in the mountains is far more important than how much rain has fallen in a desert valley. Probably 95% of the annual precipitation in my area falls as snow. Some of our mountain lakes are snowed in until July.
Most of the west will always be in drought guaranteed. Just that some years are worse than others. Nothing new here.
 

Jayson

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We have an adequate amount of rainfall runoff flowing through our property, but the brainiacs at the county water authority let it flow into the Pacific Ocean.
 
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GaRp58

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IF you let the most stupid persons keep the steering wheel in their hands...you mind end up in a deep ditch...feel sorry for Kalifornia
 

MOS0231

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Utah, Nevada, much of California, eastern Oregon, southern Idaho and much of Wyoming are deserts. By definition they are in perpetual drought. The only thing that is important in these areas is the mountain snow pack, that is where all the water comes from in most of the west. A heavy snow pack in the mountains is far more important than how much rain has fallen in a desert valley. Probably 95% of the annual precipitation in my area falls as snow. Some of our mountain lakes are snowed in until July.
Most of the west will always be in drought guaranteed. Just that some years are worse than others. Nothing new here.
Yesterday I read an article by one of the government agencies (do not recall which one) that stated most of the West's water comes from snowpack.

Listened to a interview with a JPL scientist who said historically the West is a desert. From the late 1800s through early 2000 was a unusually wet period for the region.
It may be the region is reverting back to desert.

Regardless, the region cannot sustain that many people with what water is, or is not, available.
 

MOS0231

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We have an adequate amount of rainfall runoff flowing through our property, but the brainiacs at the county water authority let it flow into the Pacific Ocean.
There could be better conservation efforts to help mitigate the situation.
But as you said, brainiacs.
 

Jayson

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There could be better conservation efforts to help mitigate the situation.
But as you said, brainiacs.
My dad was a heavy equipment operator in the Marines during the 1960’s at Camp Pendleton. The commanding general wanted his unit to build water reservoirs to make the base self sufficient. Then some environmental nutcase put a stop to it because some sand flea would be disturbed if they dug in the area.
 

Arcticdude

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Yesterday I read an article by one of the government agencies (do not recall which one) that stated most of the West's water comes from snowpack.

Listened to a interview with a JPL scientist who said historically the West is a desert. From the late 1800s through early 2000 was a unusually wet period for the region.
It may be the region is reverting back to desert.

Regardless, the region cannot sustain that many people with what water is, or is not, available.
If you look at maps from the mid 1800's it lists most of the west as the Great Desert. For good reason; most the west IS desert. On more recent maps they changed to name to the Great Basin. I guess Great Basin sounds better when the government was encouraging the settlement of the west than Great Desert does.
Just on our ranch, the snow pack on the upper elevations within our property keeps several seasonal streams running until June or July and many of our mountain meadows stay green up to August.
 

EastenerWesterner

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There is no simple answer for California’s wild fires. The Kommunist Republik is just too diverse. And different fire authorities have different approaches. As a former Volunteer, I respect CalFire. Except when the air support all gets sent to Gavin and Nancy’s wineries.

Far North and the Sierras have mountainous tree covered forests. Fires here have been like Paradise, devastating. No longer having logging or firebreaks only continues to add to the fires.

SoCal is basically a desert. Low scrub, rigorous terrain adds to this. LA county takes the approach of let it burn and we will save property as we can. More acreage burned means more $$$ in aid. I watched them lose a Reservoir across the street that they were choppering water out of. But, they stopped the fire at the property lines of houses across the street.

Then you get to the area I now live. Hilly terrain with grasslands and 300 yr old oaks. Cattle country.

Last year, I watched 3 lightning strike fires N, W, and S of me, 2-3 miles away. I had time to pack the vehicles, run the box scraper around the homestead area, and fill every water trough I had for the animals that I put into the most barren fields with the hay I had.

I thought I was in the middle of a perfect storm. When a CalFire spotter came up and was going use our ranch as first line of defense for the other 12 ranches, I said help yourself, here are the keys to the tractor if you need it.

After that experience, I have had my 4 legged lawnmowers rotating around clearing 10 Acres around the house. I have my sprayer filled with water in the barn and only have to add PhosChek and dye to put a barrier down. Takes me the hour that I ran the box scraper.

But my big thing positive about being here, the 300 yr old oaks. They have survived any past fires. They have survived past droughts. And if one succumbs, I have firewood for 10 years.
 

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