Buying a mobile home (maybe)

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kdallah

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I was considering buying a trailer/mobile home. I realize that it lacks in the protection factor but I think it's mobility makes up for it as it would be my full time home. I understand this would limit my preps to smaller levels but as long as I can get out of town it shouldn't be an issue and I don't see evacuation to be an issue here either. I have forged before and am familiar with canning. I haven't made a final decision yet but my other option is an apartment rental which is not appealing to me, or a stationary trailer rental which seems less functional, but both would give me more room. My husband would also be living with me but no kids,etc... Any ideas?
 

jimLE

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ok,for the sake of arguments.lets say the 2 of you headed out in a motorhome..do yall have a bug out location in which yall can go to?or maybe a family members home in which yall can head to?yall will need some place safe and secure to live..especially seeing how the gas in the motorhome will not only run out eventually..unless yall have a way to make fuel..but so will the ways of getting it as well..
 

kdallah

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I was looking at a trailer that we cold haul behind a truck. Like the ones at this website http://www.cruiserrv.com/products/enterra
I hadn't really considered fuel yet but I know where I would likely go in case of emergency unless the particular situation prohibits it. Regardless of Bug-out vehicle I will need fuel, and my plan is to get out there and stay put as long as it's safe. I do currently lack a fuel plan and I thank you for bringing that to my attention (it's amazing the basic things one can overlook). This might be a pipe dream but if I did pursue the trailer it would be much more cost effective than a rental. And I still have to choose a truck so I'm still very flexible on my plan. It just seems like the bug-out would be very quick, which is good because I live in a coastal region and Tsunamis/ hurricanes are a possibility. I am interested in diesel trucks for the possibility of bio-diesel although I don't know how feasible that would be with the space constraints of a trailer. Any ideas/ constructive criticisms are appreciated because I am in the planning stages and I don't holes in my plan.
 

Maverick

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I was looking at a trailer that we cold haul behind a truck. Like the ones at this website http://www.cruiserrv.com/products/enterra
I hadn't really considered fuel yet but I know where I would likely go in case of emergency unless the particular situation prohibits it. Regardless of Bug-out vehicle I will need fuel, and my plan is to get out there and stay put as long as it's safe. I do currently lack a fuel plan and I thank you for bringing that to my attention (it's amazing the basic things one can overlook). This might be a pipe dream but if I did pursue the trailer it would be much more cost effective than a rental. And I still have to choose a truck so I'm still very flexible on my plan. It just seems like the bug-out would be very quick, which is good because I live in a coastal region and Tsunamis/ hurricanes are a possibility. I am interested in diesel trucks for the possibility of bio-diesel although I don't know how feasible that would be with the space constraints of a trailer. Any ideas/ constructive criticisms are appreciated because I am in the planning stages and I don't holes in my plan.
A tow behind? I would opt for a 5th wheel if I was spending that kind of money IMHO. A 5th wheel would give better maneuverability and better stabilization at higher speeds since getting out of dodge may require higher speeds ;) nice trailer though! I would certainly opt for a diesel truck.
 

kdallah

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Thanks for the feed back! I didn't know that 5th wheels were more maneuverable. I liked the 5th wheels for comfort anyway. I was just looking at how available vehicles are with a 5th wheel hitch and that led me to the enterra but since I'll be getting my own truck that shouldn't be a huge problem.
 

Danil54grl

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We love our RV and getting a gooseneck hitch added to your truck doesn't cost that much really.
 

Ginger

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Hubby installed our first gooseneck hitch...second truck we purchased came with "hidden ball" built in flat bed GMC...the "hidden hitch" is favored. He can still use bed with siderails to haul stuff when not towing. I prefer to drive the fifth wheel as compared to a pull behind.
 

alabaster

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As to the prepping side of things, lack of storage and possible mobility issues(If you can't move it), I would think that basic wilderness survival would be a good place to start. If you don't have al ot of supplies, you'll need to know what to do when they all run out.
 

Gazrok

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I didn't know that 5th wheels were more maneuverable.
Oh yeah, they really are. Just be sure to check into getting a braking kit, that basically makes it feel as if you aren't even dealing with all that extra towed mass. My truck can do either, and I've towed both, and yeah, BIG difference between the gooseneck or bumper hitch.
 

kdallah

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Thanks a lot for all the info and suggestions I wasn't aware of the difference between trailer types. I will definitely take the advice about wilderness survival. At this point I still need quite a bit and polish my plans so outside inputs are awesome!
 

Danil54grl

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The great thing about RV's is that they are designed with as much storage space as possible and are self contained. The bad part is that you will need added supplies, like fuel, water, propane & generator unless you plan to live on an open campfire, no refrigeration and stay in the location you are at and then there is emptying the sewage and grey water periodically. And then there is the fact that it will only hold so much, so I would suggest learning about native plants in your area that can be used as food and also hunting for game. It can be done, you just have to have the right mind set and use alternative when you can.
 

Gazrok

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There are also things you can grow indoors too.
 

CharlesSibley

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You could also look at installing solar panels on top of the trailer or a portable fold out type of solar panels to use for electricity. Also one thing that I read in an article one time to increase stability and amount the trailer can safely haul look into upgrading the axles, springs and tires.
 

kdallah

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Solar panels would be great! When I found out I was moving back to the east coast from the south west, I bought a book on edible plants in this region. I think it's time to crack it open and learn something. Overall though I'm glad I'm not just getting condemnation for my trailer idea, I really appreciate the support. I am trying to live with/on less so even if the trailer doesn't work out for a bug-out plan I may still go for it. But I think it would be great for a bug-out it I can get the truck/fuel situation figured out.
 

Graynomad

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We've been living in an RV (6x6 truck actually) for 14 years, if we can find a water source to camp by we should be able to get by for at least 3 months without resupply, in theory pretty much indefinitely if I was into obtaining protein from the land.


A month here.


Six weeks here.


Two months here, only left because the river dried up :)

These places are fairly exposed but of course we weren't bugging out. But this place


Was well off the beaten track and teaming with wildlife and cattle. With a gun I reckon you could live there for a heck of a long time and nobody would know or care. We stayed 4 weeks because there was no internet connection and I needed a fix :)

As a BOV I think they are great but it depends on the situation, for natural disasters, yep, for long-term TEOTWAWKI not so much because of the fuel issues and a vehicle of any kind (let alone a well provisioned RV) will be a trouble magnet. That said if you have a BOL with no facilities you can just move everything you own out there and sit tight. Maybe erect a shed to store more preps but no need to spend a fortune on the BOL facilities. If you are living in it anyway it's just a matter of turning the key and going, nothing to pack.

Emptying sewage and grey water is a no-brainer. Grey water just runs out a hose, maybe run it a few yards from the RV or carry away in buckets every few days. Sewerage, take the canister into the bush a 100 yards or so and dump it. I've been stationary in my current location for 2 years now, I found a hollow tree stump and have been dumping the loo into that for all that time, you would hardly notice even if I pointed it out.

Solar is just a given, I don't understand why everyone worries about refrigeration etc, we have 4 fridges, 2 of which are on all the time. We use computers, use all the normal power tools, I even occasionally do some MIG welding etc etc, there's very little difference between living on solar and on the mains although of course you tend to be more frugal with your power usage. Even my little Suzuki has solar and a fridge. Naturally the climate makes a difference, I live in a very sunny country.


Note the solar panels on the truck roof (we have a lot more capacity these days), and the Suzuki's panel is out as well because we were using the fridge in the car at the time.

So it's certainly a good way to go IMO with the already-mentioned caveats about storage etc. But for long term it depends on your ability to live off the land.
 

Silent Bob

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Great Post Gray...

Are the butane canister tied into heat your water too or is strictly for cooking? Saw them in the last picture...so thought how efficient they are tied into your camper. Like I said great post...definitely your rig was built for the wilderness.
 

Danil54grl

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That is a nice set up! We really need to look into getting solar panels for ours. We just wanted to take it down to the beach property, but we are having issues with that particular county trying to get an electricity pole set. You have to have water and sewer installed before we can have the pole for whatever reason. There have been RV's down there and they have been dumping sewer on the beach properties which is a BIG NO NO here.
 

Graynomad

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Are the butane canister tied into heat your water too or is strictly for cooking?
Both, but we almost never use the hot water heater, we just heat water in a kettle on the stove. We seldom have a real shower, just sparrow wash and shower if we got into a town so we don't scare the natives :)

You have to have water and sewer installed before we can have the pole for whatever reason.
No point trying to understand council rules :) Some dickhead probably decided if you have power you will stay too long and therefore need sewerage.

You have to have water and sewer installed before we can have the pole for whatever reason.
Yes, you can't just dump it anywhere, depends on nearby water ways, terrain, who owns what etc. But there's normally an appropriate place even if you have to drive a few miles with the canister.
 

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