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bmwrickster

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I specialize in European import you are exactly correct 1 Mercedes year-to-year chassis numbers that are all different but they overshoot a lot of stuff as well
 

Kevin L

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I sometimes wonder if my views and/or experience with guns is unusual or, possibly, atypical.

You guys always seem to talk about how the .223 Remington/5.56 NATO round is anemic and under-powered.

I was a paramedic for over a decade in gun-heavy South Florida, and I've treated any number of patients whom were shot with the "anemic" .223 round.

Guess what?

This round makes a nasty mess when it hits a human body. There are often severe internal injuries that are quite distant from the entrance wound. I've usually seen more severe wounds from a .223 than from a .308 or a 30-.06.

Granted the 30 caliber rounds are heavier and carry more kinetic energy . . . but when a human body is hit by the light, fast bullet of a .223, it seems like the bullet can richochet around inside the human body if it hits a boney surface, which makes the insides of a human body look like they were run through a Cuisinart with a set of dull blades.

The idea that a .223 does more damage than a .308 is counter-intuitive, but I'll ask you to consider the difference between a victim shot in the head with a .38 Special vs. a .25 ACP (a notoriously weak round).

Although the victim will usually die either way, the .25 ACP does more damage to the brain . . . as it has enough energy to penetrate the skull in the entrance wound, yet lack the energy to leave the skull through the opposite side of the head in an exit wound.

This means that the .25 ACP bullet can bounce around inside the skull several times, which turns the brain into macerated dog food . . . while the more powerful .38 Special goes in and comes out in a (more or less) straight line.

This is one of the reasons why many assassins and hit men often prefer underpowered, modest guns that launch small bullets.

I have an AR-15 A2 simple, full-sized rifle. Mine was made by Wyndam Arms.

If I decide to move up from the .223, then I have my Springfield Armory M1A, my PTR91, or my M1 Garand. I do plan to mount a telescopic sight on my M1A.

I believe that I'll need a good selection of weapons for different tasks, but I have no intention of engaging in guerrilla warfare . . . so I don't have 75 round drums, I don't have conversion kits to turn my guns into fully-automatic weapons, I don't have bolo shot shells, "dragon's breath" fireball cartridges, black-tipped armor-piercing rounds, cyanide-coated bullets, and so forth.

In keeping with this conversation, I've always wondered why--in the movies--we see people using an eye dropper to put mercury in a hollow-point round. Metallic mercury can be toxic, but not in the immediate short-term for use in a round. So, what is the reasoning behind this myth? (in Jaws, Chief Brody put mercury in his rounds before going after the shark).

Ultimately, I believe that caliber and bullet type mean next to nothing if you can place the bullet where you want it to go.
 

Ram619

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I sometimes wonder if my views and/or experience with guns is unusual or, possibly, atypical.

You guys always seem to talk about how the .223 Remington/5.56 NATO round is anemic and under-powered.

I was a paramedic for over a decade in gun-heavy South Florida, and I've treated any number of patients whom were shot with the "anemic" .223 round.

Guess what?

This round makes a nasty mess when it hits a human body. There are often severe internal injuries that are quite distant from the entrance wound. I've usually seen more severe wounds from a .223 than from a .308 or a 30-.06.

Granted the 30 caliber rounds are heavier and carry more kinetic energy . . . but when a human body is hit by the light, fast bullet of a .223, it seems like the bullet can richochet around inside the human body if it hits a boney surface, which makes the insides of a human body look like they were run through a Cuisinart with a set of dull blades.

The idea that a .223 does more damage than a .308 is counter-intuitive, but I'll ask you to consider the difference between a victim shot in the head with a .38 Special vs. a .25 ACP (a notoriously weak round).

Although the victim will usually die either way, the .25 ACP does more damage to the brain . . . as it has enough energy to penetrate the skull in the entrance wound, yet lack the energy to leave the skull through the opposite side of the head in an exit wound.

This means that the .25 ACP bullet can bounce around inside the skull several times, which turns the brain into macerated dog food . . . while the more powerful .38 Special goes in and comes out in a (more or less) straight line.

This is one of the reasons why many assassins and hit men often prefer underpowered, modest guns that launch small bullets.

I have an AR-15 A2 simple, full-sized rifle. Mine was made by Wyndam Arms.

If I decide to move up from the .223, then I have my Springfield Armory M1A, my PTR91, or my M1 Garand. I do plan to mount a telescopic sight on my M1A.

I believe that I'll need a good selection of weapons for different tasks, but I have no intention of engaging in guerrilla warfare . . . so I don't have 75 round drums, I don't have conversion kits to turn my guns into fully-automatic weapons, I don't have bolo shot shells, "dragon's breath" fireball cartridges, black-tipped armor-piercing rounds, cyanide-coated bullets, and so forth.

In keeping with this conversation, I've always wondered why--in the movies--we see people using an eye dropper to put mercury in a hollow-point round. Metallic mercury can be toxic, but not in the immediate short-term for use in a round. So, what is the reasoning behind this myth? (in Jaws, Chief Brody put mercury in his rounds before going after the shark).

Ultimately, I believe that caliber and bullet type mean next to nothing if you can place the bullet where you want it to go.
Obviously the .223 round can be deadly. The US military (as well as many other countries around the world) have been using it to fight our wars since Vietnam.

That being said it is an underpowered round for many military uses, which is why they've been looking for something to replace it. Decades of fighting in the Middle East has shown that we need something that's more powerful at longer ranges and against barriers during CQB.

That doesn't mean that the .223 isn't a good round. Used the right way in the right conditions there's not to much that you can't accomplish with it.

I still own several rifles in .223/5.56. More than any that I own in any other caliber.

As far as mercury tipped bullets, it's the movies. Not meant to be an interpretation of real life.
 

Arcticdude

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I dont understand this fascination with military weapons and shooting people on a prepper site. I have an AR 15 and for me its a useless gun. The 5.56/223 is not a hunting round, which is why I'm selling the AR and the ammo for it. I've got a number of guns that are far more suited for putting food on the table than the AR. If I need to shoot a predator at long distance my 22-250 fitted with a Zeiss scope is a much better choice.
We aren't going to war and we're aren't going to start shooting the invaders from the south. If I lived in an urban area I might have a different opinion on these guns, but I doubt it.
For some I think they just like reliving their glory days in the military.
 

Kevin L

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Obviously the .223 round can be deadly. The US military (as well as many other countries around the world) have been using it to fight our wars since Vietnam.

That being said it is an underpowered round for many military uses, which is why they've been looking for something to replace it. Decades of fighting in the Middle East has shown that we need something that's more powerful at longer ranges and against barriers during CQB.

That doesn't mean that the .223 isn't a good round. Used the right way in the right conditions there's not to much that you can't accomplish with it.

I still own several rifles in .223/5.56. More than any that I own in any other caliber.

As far as mercury tipped bullets, it's the movies. Not meant to be an interpretation of real life.
I wonder why the problem can't be solved by equipping some soldiers with a M16, and some soldiers with an M14.

In military units, some soldiers are machine gunners, some are equipped with a M203 grenade launcher, while others may be carrying other specific weapons that are needed for the mission.

Since this is the case, why is it such a problem for some infantry to carry an M16, and others (designated marksmen?) carry an M14?

We already have both styles of weapon in government storage.

I realize that there's a need for some uniformity with regards to weapons, as you may need to use your wounded buddy's rifle during an emergency, and confusing the controls while under fire seems likely . . . but a military unit has different weapons for different purposes anyway (as I indicated earlier).
 

MOS0231

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I dont understand this fascination with military weapons and shooting people on a prepper site. I have an AR 15 and for me its a useless gun. The 5.56/223 is not a hunting round, which is why I'm selling the AR and the ammo for it. I've got a number of guns that are far more suited for putting food on the table than the AR. If I need to shoot a predator at long distance my 22-250 fitted with a Zeiss scope is a much better choice.
We aren't going to war and we're aren't going to start shooting the invaders from the south. If I lived in an urban area I might have a different opinion on these guns, but I doubt it.
For some I think they just like reliving their glory days in the military.
Seems to me some think in a SHTF situation, they think they will be fighting firefight like situations on a nearly daily basis.
Possible? Sure.
Likely? Magic 8-Ball says, "Future uncertain."

Had a co-worker hand me his brand new Spikes Tactical AR15, like he was presenting his new born son.
I immediately handed it back and said, "Meh, seen one, ya seen them all."
 

Ram619

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Personally I love my AR's and other .223/5.56 rifles. Not because the military uses them or because I think I'm going to be fighting off hoards of people anytime soon. I just enjoy shooting them. I like practicing at the range and shooting in competition with them. Ammo is (well was) fairly cheap, and you can fire them all day long without being even the tiniest bit sore.
 

Schattentarn

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The AR in carbine form is light, short, accurate, the ammo is more available that for similar weapons, it is modular and easily fixed and ammo weight is less than other "weapons of war". I don't care what the military uses either but for me and my body build, philosophy and aptitude, the AR was the best rifle pick I do shoot targets, balloons, plastic bottles for moving targets, but this is purely a self defense, SHTF, militia item for me. I am not going to hunt. I can fish really well and can trade fish or firewood for meat with people who know how to hunt and process the meat.

Of course other rifles will work and maybe better for you.
 

Bigfoot

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I had a 556 briefly.. I bought it for pig hunting but after shooting my first hog with it I decided to sell it. I hit a hog at 60 yards and the dang thing just kept on going and going and going. It was a perfect shot in the shoulder but didnt stop it. Never found the pig. That was when I decided I didnt have any use for a 556. I switched to the 6.8 and it definitely puts em down much faster and I feel more confident with this round for hunting.
 

Acdoctor

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In my opinion a AR -15 is simply a fun gun to recreational shoot, 3gun comp or plinking and varmint hunting. If I need a gun to protect myself or family with then my 40 cal will do the work. in a shtf event I’m not going to let them get close enough to stink up my property, I will be using a long range rifle with a take no prisoners attitude. In that event I’m going to swear I call 811 before I dug the hole.
 

Kevin L

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I only have an AR-15 so I can scavenge and/or trade for parts, springs, magazines, and ammo . . . and everybody and their mother owns AR-15's up here, so I'm concerned about the long term.

In fairness to a dissenting opinion from a close friend whom's judgment I trust--he pointed out that a cheaper AK-47 is less likely to need fixed.

Special Forces units in Afghanistan have captured AK-47 rifles that had been carried and used almost daily by Muslim tribesmen for over 35 years in the same extended family--and they still worked and functioned just fine.

In any case, I won't purchase an AK-47. I believe I'm in a good place with regards to guns, and I have been focusing on my nursing education and working out hard and--more or less--religiously in the gym.

I have been practicing how to make a bow-drill fire, and identifying edible wild plants in this area. We have prickly pear, fiddleheads, and cattails at the very least. The environment in the northern part of this state is quite different from further south, so I have had to adjust my prepping plans slightly.
 

MOS0231

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I only have an AR-15 so I can scavenge and/or trade for parts, springs, magazines, and ammo . . . and everybody and their mother owns AR-15's up here, so I'm concerned about the long term.

In fairness to a dissenting opinion from a close friend whom's judgment I trust--he pointed out that a cheaper AK-47 is less likely to need fixed.

Special Forces units in Afghanistan have captured AK-47 rifles that had been carried and used almost daily by Muslim tribesmen for over 35 years in the same extended family--and they still worked and functioned just fine.

In any case, I won't purchase an AK-47. I believe I'm in a good place with regards to guns, and I have been focusing on my nursing education and working out hard and--more or less--religiously in the gym.

I have been practicing how to make a bow-drill fire, and identifying edible wild plants in this area. We have prickly pear, fiddleheads, and cattails at the very least. The environment in the northern part of this state is quite different from further south, so I have had to adjust my prepping plans slightly.
We had patrols who found weapons caches buried in the ground.
Get the sand and dirt out of the barrel, clear the action, the AK would fire.
 

tmttactical

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Like any other tool, firearms will excel at certain tasks and have greatly reduced effectiveness at other tasks. I have a 9mm pistol for very close and personal distances. I have a 9 mm carbine for home defense. 2 AR15 (223 wylde & 7.62 x 39) for medium distances and as force multipliers. I have a PCP air rifle for quite small game hunting / pest control, out to about 50 yards. A suppressed 22lr, bolt action rifle for small game at 50+ yards. A 6.5 Creedmoor for long distance shooting. While any of these weapons can be lethal, each will excel at different tasks. The 22lr will not be effective at 1,000 yards, like the 6,5 Creedmoor but then again the 6.5 Creedmoor would completely destroy a squirrel --- no meat for the dinner table. There is no perfect weapon for all occasions. The right tool for the right task.
 

MOS0231

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Like any other tool, firearms will excel at certain tasks and have greatly reduced effectiveness at other tasks. I have a 9mm pistol for very close and personal distances. I have a 9 mm carbine for home defense. 2 AR15 (223 wylde & 7.62 x 39) for medium distances and as force multipliers. I have a PCP air rifle for quite small game hunting / pest control, out to about 50 yards. A suppressed 22lr, bolt action rifle for small game at 50+ yards. A 6.5 Creedmoor for long distance shooting. While any of these weapons can be lethal, each will excel at different tasks. The 22lr will not be effective at 1,000 yards, like the 6,5 Creedmoor but then again the 6.5 Creedmoor would completely destroy a squirrel --- no meat for the dinner table. There is no perfect weapon for all occasions. The right tool for the right task.
Well said.

I would argue I can load a 100grn round nose with a reduced charge in .308WIN for squirrels, but I have yet to put that into practical application.
 

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